Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 95584 times)

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Bethczar

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #855 on: February 29, 2012, 06:49:42 PM »
Time for another "what do you call this" quiz!

Through North America, I've found that the burgers from Maccas and Burger King etc are referred to by the staff as "sandwiches". In Aussie (and from what I've found, everyone not working there, they are burgers), so...

To me:
Maccas/Burger King/Hungry Jacks etc serve burgers (some sort of bread roll with a hot filling)
Sandwiches are two (or sometimes three) slices of bread with some sort of filling, either hot or cold
Rolls are similar to burgers (ie a roll, not bread), except their fillings are usually cold - eg cold BBQ chicken or ham etc as apposed to a hot chicken fillet or a meat patty.

So, how do you define a burger, a sandwich and a roll?

A roll is a roundish, single serving of bread that I might have with dinner.

A sandwich is comprised of two pieces of bread with some sort of filling between them.

A burger is a subset of sandwich.  It usually has a beef patty, onion, tomato, lettuce, and pickle slices as the filling, but the beef patty may be replaced with something else.

And to make it even more confusing....

A 'patty' melt is normally a ground beef patty with melted cheese and fried onions on sandwich bread.

A 'tuna melt' is a grilled tuna sandwich with cheese   ;)

That depends on where you are in the US. Around here (New England), the tuna melts I get in restaurants are open-faced tuna sandwiches with melted cheese on top, served warm. It is only by reading EHell that I have learned that in other parts of the US, the tuna melt has two pieces of bread.

Bethczar

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #856 on: February 29, 2012, 06:52:38 PM »
Time for another "what do you call this" quiz!

Through North America, I've found that the burgers from Maccas and Burger King etc are referred to by the staff as "sandwiches". In Aussie (and from what I've found, everyone not working there, they are burgers), so...

To me:
Maccas/Burger King/Hungry Jacks etc serve burgers (some sort of bread roll with a hot filling)
Sandwiches are two (or sometimes three) slices of bread with some sort of filling, either hot or cold
Rolls are similar to burgers (ie a roll, not bread), except their fillings are usually cold - eg cold BBQ chicken or ham etc as apposed to a hot chicken fillet or a meat patty.

So, how do you define a burger, a sandwich and a roll?

A roll is a roundish, single serving of bread that I might have with dinner.

A sandwich is comprised of two pieces of bread with some sort of filling between them.

A burger is a subset of sandwich.  It usually has a beef patty, onion, tomato, lettuce, and pickle slices as the filling, but the beef patty may be replaced with something else.

And to make it even more confusing....

A 'patty' melt is normally a ground beef patty with melted cheese and fried onions on sandwich bread.

A 'tuna melt' is a grilled tuna sandwich with cheese   ;)

That depends on where you are in the US. Around here (New England), the tuna melts I get in restaurants are open-faced tuna sandwiches with melted cheese on top, served warm. It is only by reading EHell that I have learned that in other parts of the US, the tuna melt has two pieces of bread.
I'm in Wisconsin, and to me a tuna melt is also an open face sandwich (as above), but on English muffins, not bread.

Mopsy428

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #857 on: February 29, 2012, 06:53:46 PM »
Time for another "what do you call this" quiz!

Through North America, I've found that the burgers from Maccas and Burger King etc are referred to by the staff as "sandwiches". In Aussie (and from what I've found, everyone not working there, they are burgers), so...

To me:
Maccas/Burger King/Hungry Jacks etc serve burgers (some sort of bread roll with a hot filling)
Sandwiches are two (or sometimes three) slices of bread with some sort of filling, either hot or cold
Rolls are similar to burgers (ie a roll, not bread), except their fillings are usually cold - eg cold BBQ chicken or ham etc as apposed to a hot chicken fillet or a meat patty.

So, how do you define a burger, a sandwich and a roll?

A roll is a roundish, single serving of bread that I might have with dinner.

A sandwich is comprised of two pieces of bread with some sort of filling between them.

A burger is a subset of sandwich.  It usually has a beef patty, onion, tomato, lettuce, and pickle slices as the filling, but the beef patty may be replaced with something else.

And to make it even more confusing....

A 'patty' melt is normally a ground beef patty with melted cheese and fried onions on sandwich bread.

A 'tuna melt' is a grilled tuna sandwich with cheese   ;)

That depends on where you are in the US. Around here (New England), the tuna melts I get in restaurants are open-faced tuna sandwiches with melted cheese on top, served warm. It is only by reading EHell that I have learned that in other parts of the US, the tuna melt has two pieces of bread.
I'm from New England, and I've never had a tuna melt that was open-faced.

baglady

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #858 on: February 29, 2012, 08:44:57 PM »
Then there's "rolls" vs. "buns."

The things that burgers and hot dogs are served on can be either "rolls" or "buns." So can the yummy cinnamon things served for breakfast (cinnamon rolls/cinnamon buns).

However, the single-serving bread things that are served with dinner are always rolls, never buns. Ditto the hard roll, kaiser roll or bulkie roll (I think Bulkie is/was a brand name in New England), which is round and crusty like a hamburger bun, but bigger, and the sub/hoagie roll.

This is all based on my own experience in the Northeastern U.S.

BTW, feel free to compliment me on my buns. But not my rolls!  ;)
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Thipu1

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #859 on: February 29, 2012, 09:03:32 PM »
Burgers, sandwiches and rolls.

In NYC a burger is a round sandwich with a hot filling.  The bread may vary but it is usually a white bread that is slightly sweet.  The filling may be meat, fish or vegetable. Whatever it is, the filling of the burger will be round and grilled.  Condiments such as ketchup, mustard or mayo will be offered.

Here, a roll is usually a lobster roll.  This is a cold sandwich made with lobster meat, celery and lots of mayo.  It is almost always served in a long hot dog bun. 

A sandwich usually has two pieces of bread with filling between.  A club sandwich will have three slices of bread.  Most sandwiches  are expected to be picked up and eaten in the hand.  An 'open-faced' sandwich will require a knife and fork to eat.  Melts fall into this category. 

oz diva

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #860 on: March 01, 2012, 02:41:11 AM »
What do you call various fast food joints. I noticed someone referred to Macca's (McDonald's) upthread. In this house we call it The Scottish Restaurant because my husband is Scottish and well you know it has a Scottish name. My BIL calls it Mickey Dee's and usually it is called Macca's in Australia.

Victoria

iridaceae

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #861 on: March 01, 2012, 03:16:58 AM »
I usually call McDonald's Mickey Dee's.

Thipu1

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #862 on: March 01, 2012, 09:15:16 AM »
We have a Egyptian place named 'Mr. Falafel'. 

A friend calls it 'Mr. Feel Awful'.  This is terribly unfair because the food is very good.z

violinp

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #863 on: March 01, 2012, 01:36:26 PM »
Does anyone here call Walmart Wally World? That's what my friends and I always called it.
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Thipu1

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #864 on: March 01, 2012, 02:46:49 PM »
I've heard Walmart called 'Voldemart'. 


JennJenn68

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #865 on: March 01, 2012, 02:53:58 PM »
My husband always refers to Home Depot as "Home Despot".  But he still loves to shop there...

Betelnut

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #866 on: March 01, 2012, 02:57:54 PM »
I've heard Walmart called 'Voldemart'.

LOL!  Will start using as of today.
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baglady

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #867 on: March 01, 2012, 09:07:46 PM »
We say Home Despot and Wally World, too. Also Tar-zhay and Jacque Penne. The electronics chain is Radio Schmuck. The Salvation Army is Sal's or the Starvation Army. I call Victoria's Secret Vicky's Place, although I don't shop there.
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iridaceae

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #868 on: March 02, 2012, 12:40:21 AM »
Also Tar-zhay and Jacque Penne.

I was on a tour two years ago and someone at lunch was complementing me on my shoulder bag and wondered where I'd gotten it; I automatically said Tar-zhay and a man at the table wondered what that was as he'd never heard of it in California. We were all kind of embarrassed when I explained that it was Target.

lollylegs

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #869 on: March 02, 2012, 04:17:01 AM »
I don't think this one has been mentioned yet: cheerios.  In Australia, they're cocktail weiners.  In America, it's cereal.