Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 97753 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

oz diva

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1162
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #870 on: March 02, 2012, 06:27:37 AM »
Cheerios are cereal to me.

Victoria

bigozzy

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2093
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #871 on: March 02, 2012, 07:18:35 AM »
Cheerios are cereal to me.

Might be regional/generational? In QLD in the 60's cheerios and tom sauce were a party must! Plus spiders and aeroplane jelly of course.

veryfluffy

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2946
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #872 on: March 02, 2012, 11:08:20 AM »


Here, a roll is usually a lobster roll.  This is a cold sandwich made with lobster meat, celery and lots of mayo.  It is almost always served in a long hot dog bun. 


That sounds sooo amazing.
   

Moonie

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 358
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #873 on: March 02, 2012, 05:46:31 PM »
Revisiting the name for toilets or bathrooms:

My parent's names:

John and Lou  ;)


oz diva

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1162
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #874 on: March 02, 2012, 08:12:53 PM »
Cheerios are cereal to me.

Might be regional/generational? In QLD in the 60's cheerios and tom sauce were a party must! Plus spiders and aeroplane jelly of course.
Not to mention fairy bread.

here they are often called Little Boys, but I just call 'em frankfurts.

Victoria

JonGirl

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4749
  • I'm a JonGirl forever.
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBAa6CvY-TQ
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #875 on: March 02, 2012, 10:54:41 PM »
Cheerios are cereal to me.

Might be regional/generational? In QLD in the 60's cheerios and tom sauce were a party must! Plus spiders and aeroplane jelly of course.
Not to mention fairy bread.

here they are often called Little Boys, but I just call 'em frankfurts.

It must be regional, in my house we call them little dogs.  :)
Cheerios are cereal.
Stewart/Colbert '16

DaisyG

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 122
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #876 on: March 11, 2012, 06:32:02 PM »
The Salvation Army is Sal's or the Starvation Army.

A friend once told me she got a top from 'Sally's boutique' - it took me a while to find out it had come from the Salvation Army shop.

bigozzy

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2093
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #877 on: March 13, 2012, 10:04:44 AM »
The Salvation Army is Sal's or the Starvation Army.

A friend once told me she got a top from 'Sally's boutique' - it took me a while to find out it had come from the Salvation Army shop.


'Salvos' where I'm from and 'St. Vinnies' for St Vincent de Paul society shops.

When I was a child, charity shops were called 'op shops' for opportunity shops. Might again be regional and age related.

oz diva

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1162
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #878 on: March 14, 2012, 12:28:56 AM »
The Salvation Army is Sal's or the Starvation Army.

A friend once told me she got a top from 'Sally's boutique' - it took me a while to find out it had come from the Salvation Army shop.


'Salvos' where I'm from and 'St. Vinnies' for St Vincent de Paul society shops.

When I was a child, charity shops were called 'op shops' for opportunity shops. Might again be regional and age related.

Op shop is the generic term. I was in one today - picking up chipped crockery for a school fete.

Victoria

cabbageweevil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1099
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #879 on: March 14, 2012, 07:36:26 AM »
The Salvation Army is Sal's or the Starvation Army.
Just noticed this one, from the ongoing posts about thrift shops and their nicknames.  I've always thought the "Starvation Army" bit, to be originally a tag from a hundred-odd years ago. In the all-but-war situation that obtained then, between militant secular socialists and militant evangelical Christians -- two groups with extremely different views of what was wrong in the world, and what to do about it; both parties made much use of music and song, and in the course of that, enthusiastically borrowed / stole from each other.  If I recall rightly, "Starvation Army" comes in the song "Pie In The Sky" -- a socialist parody of the Christian "In The Sweet By-and-By".

baglady

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4650
  • A big lass and a bonny lass and she loves her beer
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #880 on: March 16, 2012, 10:10:24 AM »
The Salvation Army is Sal's or the Starvation Army.
Just noticed this one, from the ongoing posts about thrift shops and their nicknames.  I've always thought the "Starvation Army" bit, to be originally a tag from a hundred-odd years ago. In the all-but-war situation that obtained then, between militant secular socialists and militant evangelical Christians -- two groups with extremely different views of what was wrong in the world, and what to do about it; both parties made much use of music and song, and in the course of that, enthusiastically borrowed / stole from each other.  If I recall rightly, "Starvation Army" comes in the song "Pie In The Sky" -- a socialist parody of the Christian "In The Sweet By-and-By".

That's where we got it! I love that song. (Nitpick: The actual title is "Preacher and the Slave"):

And the Starvation Army they play,
And they sing and they clap and they pray.
Till they get all your coin on the drum,
Then they tell you when you are on the bum:
If you fight hard for children and wife
Try to get something good in this life
You're a sinner and bad man, they tell,
When you die you will sure go to hell.

You will eat, by and by,
In that glorious land above the sky;
Work and pray, live on hay,
You'll get pie in the sky when you die. (That's a lie!)
My photography is on Redbubble! Come see: http://www.redbubble.com/people/baglady

cabbageweevil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1099
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #881 on: March 18, 2012, 08:06:24 PM »
That's it !  I gather that the two sides "agreed to disagree" with fair ease, overall -- as much in fun, as in real hatred; physical violence was forbidden for the Christians (and they were supposed to love their enemies), and the socialists saw themselves as confronted with worse and more serious and urgent foes, than those whom they regarded as religious nutters...

baglady

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4650
  • A big lass and a bonny lass and she loves her beer
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #882 on: March 18, 2012, 11:06:11 PM »
That's it !  I gather that the two sides "agreed to disagree" with fair ease, overall -- as much in fun, as in real hatred; physical violence was forbidden for the Christians (and they were supposed to love their enemies), and the socialists saw themselves as confronted with worse and more serious and urgent foes, than those whom they regarded as religious nutters...

I'm curious to know where that interpretation comes from. No snark, I promise; I'm genuinely curious. I was taught that that early 20th-century labor activists set their anthems to hymn tunes because those were the songs that (almost) everybody knew. Radio hadn't been invented, and recording was in its infancy, but most people went to church, so those melodies would be familiar to them.
My photography is on Redbubble! Come see: http://www.redbubble.com/people/baglady

cabbageweevil

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1099
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #883 on: March 19, 2012, 04:00:08 AM »
I was only musing that this was seemingly a war of words and music, rather than physical blows -- should have said, "disagreed, but with a ceertain amount of goodwill".

Didn't the "borrowing", in the widest sense, go both ways? -- General Booth and his "Why should the devil have all the best tunes?", with Christian words being put to the rousing tunes of secular songs... and the socialists applying the same process in reverse.  Agreed, hymn tunes were well and widely known; and a lot of the old hymns do have splendid tunes.

katycoo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3801
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #884 on: March 26, 2012, 08:36:22 PM »
There was a fruit shop near me in Glasgow called Roots and Fruits, you wouldn't get that name in Australia.

Actually, you probably would...