Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 95262 times)

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katycoo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #885 on: March 26, 2012, 08:40:27 PM »
Cheerios are cereal to me.

Might be regional/generational? In QLD in the 60's cheerios and tom sauce were a party must! Plus spiders and aeroplane jelly of course.

Regional  They're cocktail franks.

bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #886 on: March 27, 2012, 05:43:48 AM »
There was a fruit shop near me in Glasgow called Roots and Fruits, you wouldn't get that name in Australia.

Actually, you probably would...


But you wouldn't go their to buy an apple...

bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #887 on: March 27, 2012, 05:46:25 AM »
There was a fruit shop near me in Glasgow called Roots and Fruits, you wouldn't get that name in Australia.

Actually, you probably would...


Actually, I know the shop. Was it the one in the Kelvin Grove area near the uni? I used to go there for pumpkins and plantains and the like.

I love to make pumpkin soup but very few places in Scotland stock them outside of Halloween time.

Elfmama

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #888 on: March 27, 2012, 09:41:52 AM »
Late autumn is the only time you see pumpkins here in the US, too.  Halloween/Thanksgiving are the only holidays that require them.

Can you get canned pumpkin there, bigozzy?  That ought to work just fine.
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bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #889 on: March 27, 2012, 02:43:53 PM »
Late autumn is the only time you see pumpkins here in the US, too.  Halloween/Thanksgiving are the only holidays that require them.

Can you get canned pumpkin there, bigozzy?  That ought to work just fine.

I will have to look, the idea does not quite appeal though, I guess I am fussy. But I love making roast pumpkin and pumpkin rissotto/ravioli from fresh as well!

In Australia it was common to sell many varieties and we used to grow it as kids. We always had roasted pumpkin with roast dinners as well.

Bluenomi

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #890 on: March 27, 2012, 06:30:33 PM »
There was a fruit shop near me in Glasgow called Roots and Fruits, you wouldn't get that name in Australia.

Actually, you probably would...


Actually, I know the shop. Was it the one in the Kelvin Grove area near the uni? I used to go there for pumpkins and plantains and the like.

I love to make pumpkin soup but very few places in Scotland stock them outside of Halloween time.

Pumpkin seems to be getting more common in the UK I've noticed. Though they have this annoying habit of calling butternut pumpkin butternut squash. It makes me all stabby and I end up yelling at the tv when watching British cooking shows  ;D I can handle courgette and aubergine but butternut squash bugs me.

camlan

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #891 on: March 27, 2012, 07:13:32 PM »
There was a fruit shop near me in Glasgow called Roots and Fruits, you wouldn't get that name in Australia.

Actually, you probably would...


Actually, I know the shop. Was it the one in the Kelvin Grove area near the uni? I used to go there for pumpkins and plantains and the like.

I love to make pumpkin soup but very few places in Scotland stock them outside of Halloween time.

Pumpkin seems to be getting more common in the UK I've noticed. Though they have this annoying habit of calling butternut pumpkin butternut squash. It makes me all stabby and I end up yelling at the tv when watching British cooking shows  ;D I can handle courgette and aubergine but butternut squash bugs me.

We call it butternut squash here in the US, as well. Pumpkin here pretty much only refers to anything that looks like a Halloween pumpkin. Everything else is squash.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Thipu1

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #892 on: March 28, 2012, 11:01:58 AM »
We make a differentiation between pumpkin and squash. 

There are also several types of pumpkin.  The variety used at Halloween is round and orange.  There isn't all that much inside although the seeds are good.  There is also the cheese pumpkin that many people prefer for cooking.  This sort is flatter and paler.  It also has much more meat than the other sort. 

Here, butternut is used exclusively for a squash. 

hobish

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #893 on: March 28, 2012, 01:13:23 PM »
The Salvation Army is Sal's or the Starvation Army.
Just noticed this one, from the ongoing posts about thrift shops and their nicknames.  I've always thought the "Starvation Army" bit, to be originally a tag from a hundred-odd years ago. In the all-but-war situation that obtained then, between militant secular socialists and militant evangelical Christians -- two groups with extremely different views of what was wrong in the world, and what to do about it; both parties made much use of music and song, and in the course of that, enthusiastically borrowed / stole from each other.  If I recall rightly, "Starvation Army" comes in the song "Pie In The Sky" -- a socialist parody of the Christian "In The Sweet By-and-By".

That's where we got it! I love that song. (Nitpick: The actual title is "Preacher and the Slave"):

And the Starvation Army they play,
And they sing and they clap and they pray.
Till they get all your coin on the drum,
Then they tell you when you are on the bum:
If you fight hard for children and wife
Try to get something good in this life
You're a sinner and bad man, they tell,
When you die you will sure go to hell.

You will eat, by and by,
In that glorious land above the sky;
Work and pray, live on hay,
You'll get pie in the sky when you die. (That's a lie!)

Ohhhh! I have a recording of Utah Phillips doing that song somewhere; i never put the two together.

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katycoo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #894 on: March 28, 2012, 06:36:38 PM »
There was a fruit shop near me in Glasgow called Roots and Fruits, you wouldn't get that name in Australia.

Actually, you probably would...


But you wouldn't go their to buy an apple...

Actually I can seriously see someone naming a fruit shop that.  Its funny.  We like a good pun.

oz diva

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #895 on: March 28, 2012, 06:47:15 PM »
There was a fruit shop near me in Glasgow called Roots and Fruits, you wouldn't get that name in Australia.

Actually, you probably would...

Actually, I know the shop. Was it the one in the Kelvin Grove area near the uni? I used to go there for pumpkins and plantains and the like.

I love to make pumpkin soup but very few places in Scotland stock them outside of Halloween time.

Yes, that's the one. I used to stock up BIG there. It was the only place I could find butternut squash to make tasty pumpkin soup. I used to live nearby.

Victoria

starry diadem

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #896 on: April 03, 2012, 02:32:24 AM »
There was a fruit shop near me in Glasgow called Roots and Fruits, you wouldn't get that name in Australia.

Actually, you probably would...

Actually, I know the shop. Was it the one in the Kelvin Grove area near the uni? I used to go there for pumpkins and plantains and the like.

I love to make pumpkin soup but very few places in Scotland stock them outside of Halloween time.

Yes, that's the one. I used to stock up BIG there. It was the only place I could find butternut squash to make tasty pumpkin soup. I used to live nearby.


And now you can buy butternut squash in any of the big supermarkets, all year round.  Just as well, as I virtually live on a version of Nigel Slater's spicy pumpkin soup (using squash instead of pumpkin).  This week I've made it with coquina squash, which works just as well but is *very* orange.
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jassou

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #897 on: April 18, 2012, 01:48:58 PM »
I keep reading about 'big bix stores', supposedly in the US, what are they?

Moray

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #898 on: April 18, 2012, 01:58:31 PM »
I keep reading about 'big bix stores', supposedly in the US, what are they?

I think that's a mis-type of the term "big box stores", which referrs to very large chain stores like Walmart, Kmart, Shopko and the like.
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Betelnut

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #899 on: April 18, 2012, 02:05:18 PM »
I keep reading about 'big bix stores', supposedly in the US, what are they?

I think that's a mis-type of the term "big box stores", which referrs to very large chain stores like Walmart, Kmart, Shopko and the like.

They are called "big box" because the actually buildings are huge and resemble, you got it, boxes.  They require a lot of land, parking and other infrastructure.
"And thus the whirligig of time brings in his
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