Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 119755 times)

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jassou

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #900 on: April 18, 2012, 03:19:11 PM »
yes, that was a typo, I meant big box  :-[ (and just had to fix another typo, otherwise it would have read 'bug box'...  ::))

Ah, it refers to the look of a shop! I was wondering, shops that sell items in big boxes, like TV's, or bulk items... Couldn't figure it out. Thanks!

Slartibartfast

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #901 on: April 18, 2012, 03:30:35 PM »
yes, that was a typo, I meant big box  :-[ (and just had to fix another typo, otherwise it would have read 'bug box'...  ::))

Ah, it refers to the look of a shop! I was wondering, shops that sell items in big boxes, like TV's, or bulk items... Couldn't figure it out. Thanks!

Another characteristic of big box stores is that they have little, if any, inventory "in the back."  They will have a dozen of something on the shelf, sometimes some extras stacked on some high shelves that you can't reach without a ladder, but they restock in large amounts less frequently instead of keeping only one or two of something in the store and several more in a storeroom.  Often they're run on a razor-thin inventory system, so their computers know up to the minute how many of any given item the store has in stock and how many of which items they need to re-order each week.  A lot of big box stores don't really have a "back," other than an unloading/unboxing area.

DistantStar

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #902 on: April 20, 2012, 02:40:16 PM »
Often they're run on a razor-thin inventory system, so their computers know up to the minute how many of any given item the store has in stock and how many of which items they need to re-order each week.  A lot of big box stores don't really have a "back," other than an unloading/unboxing area.

True, except the computer tracking can be...questionable.  So speaketh a former big-box employee.

Mental Magpie

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #903 on: April 21, 2012, 12:40:04 AM »
Just posting for updates  :D
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oz diva

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #904 on: April 23, 2012, 03:29:54 AM »
I was watching YouTube clips of Britain's Got Talent and a little girl sang "Turn My Swag On" what does that mean?

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bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #905 on: April 23, 2012, 08:37:14 AM »
I was watching YouTube clips of Britain's Got Talent and a little girl sang "Turn My Swag On" what does that mean?

Something to do with 'swaggering'? Just guessing as I am GOF

violinp

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #906 on: May 08, 2012, 03:16:17 AM »
I was watching YouTube clips of Britain's Got Talent and a little girl sang "Turn My Swag On" what does that mean?

Something to do with 'swaggering'? Just guessing as I am GOF

Swag is short for swagger. The shortening of the word is mostly used, I find, in hip - hop and rap songs.
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Mental Magpie

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #907 on: May 08, 2012, 03:35:39 AM »
I was watching YouTube clips of Britain's Got Talent and a little girl sang "Turn My Swag On" what does that mean?

Something to do with 'swaggering'? Just guessing as I am GOF

Swag is short for swagger. The shortening of the word is mostly used, I find, in hip - hop and rap songs.

Swag can mean a lot of different things in the US, but it all comes down to about the same thing.  If you get a lot of cool free stuff at a convention, that's swag.  If you've got a lot of cool or *sweet* jewelry that makes you look awesome, that's swag.  It's that which gives you swagger, but really only replies to a certain culture, aka hip hop, even though other cultures have adopted it for their own use...meaning *swag* as it relates to their own culture.  Yes, it is short for swagger.
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violinp

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #908 on: May 08, 2012, 08:56:25 PM »
I'm in the Southeast US, and people here only use call around to mean calling several people, as in calling around to see who can give me a ride.
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baglady

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #909 on: May 08, 2012, 08:56:58 PM »
USA here. To me "call around" means make multiple phone calls. "I'd love to go, but let me call around and see if I can get a ride/date/babysitter."

I'm not sure "swag" and "swagger" are related. According to the dictionary, "swagger" means "walk or behave in a very confident and typically arrogant or aggressive way." "Swag" has multiple meanings ranging from "ornamental festoon" to "goods taken by a thief," but in modern American usage it's basically "stuff," generally free stuff with some promotional strings attached.

When I got replicas of Dr. House's cane and that oversized tennis ball he keeps in his office, that was swag, because they were free (Fox sent them out to us entertainment media folk). The bags of goodies they hand out to the stars at awards shows are swag -- again, because they're free. If we bought it ourselves, it wouldn't be swag.
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Mopsy428

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #910 on: May 08, 2012, 10:08:34 PM »
This is from my thread about calling before you come over. I used the phrase "Can I call around on Tuesday to do blah blah blah?"

Now to me(an Aussie), the phrase "call around" means "I'm going to stop by", not "I'm going to call you", but there were a few posters who took it as I'm going to call you.

How would you take it if someone said they would be calling around? (and where in the world are you?)
I'm in the US, and I would take it to mean that you are going to make a phone call.

However, we do use the term "calling hours" for wakes.

Bluenomi

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #911 on: May 08, 2012, 10:18:48 PM »
I heard one on the radio this morning. Here is Australia and in the UK if you say you've lucked out it mean you've had bad luck. I lucked out in the lotto draw last night, I didn't win anything.

Apparently lucked out means the opposite in the US and means you've had good luck. Is this true?

Mental Magpie

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #912 on: May 08, 2012, 10:22:21 PM »
USA here. To me "call around" means make multiple phone calls. "I'd love to go, but let me call around and see if I can get a ride/date/babysitter."

I'm not sure "swag" and "swagger" are related. According to the dictionary, "swagger" means "walk or behave in a very confident and typically arrogant or aggressive way." "Swag" has multiple meanings ranging from "ornamental festoon" to "goods taken by a thief," but in modern American usage it's basically "stuff," generally free stuff with some promotional strings attached.

When I got replicas of Dr. House's cane and that oversized tennis ball he keeps in his office, that was swag, because they were free (Fox sent them out to us entertainment media folk). The bags of goodies they hand out to the stars at awards shows are swag -- again, because they're free. If we bought it ourselves, it wouldn't be swag.

In slang, I've heard "He's got swagger" to mean that he is confident and it looks great, and thus  his "swag" is what gives him that "swagger", like awesome "bling" is the swag that gives him his swagger.

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PaintingPastelPrincess

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #913 on: May 08, 2012, 10:36:06 PM »
I heard one on the radio this morning. Here is Australia and in the UK if you say you've lucked out it mean you've had bad luck. I lucked out in the lotto draw last night, I didn't win anything.

Apparently lucked out means the opposite in the US and means you've had good luck. Is this true?

I've always used it to mean "I've had such good luck, that I must now be out of luck for the future."  For example, if I won $5 at the casino, I have good luck, or was lucky.  If I win $500, I've lucked out, because that would be a miracle for me, and I would then immediately leave the casino so that my newfound lack of luck wouldn't cause the casino to reabsorb the money.  :)

Mental Magpie

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #914 on: May 08, 2012, 11:02:39 PM »
I heard one on the radio this morning. Here is Australia and in the UK if you say you've lucked out it mean you've had bad luck. I lucked out in the lotto draw last night, I didn't win anything.

Apparently lucked out means the opposite in the US and means you've had good luck. Is this true?

I've always used it to mean "I've had such good luck, that I must now be out of luck for the future."  For example, if I won $5 at the casino, I have good luck, or was lucky.  If I win $500, I've lucked out, because that would be a miracle for me, and I would then immediately leave the casino so that my newfound lack of luck wouldn't cause the casino to reabsorb the money.  :)

I agree.  It means that I got lucky when I wasn't expecting it, and that it was way more than was expected.  "I really lucked out when they told me someone called in and canceled her appointment.  Now I can get my roots dyed before the wedding!"  It is unexpected luck.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.