Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 96515 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Cyradis

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1675
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #15 on: September 24, 2011, 01:06:12 AM »
Thongs!

In Trinidad thongs are underwear.
In Australia thongs are summer slippers. This electrified the Trinidadian guests at my cousin's wedding in Australia. The priest was making some point or other and referenced the rehearsal with the wedding party in jeans and thongs and the wedding ceremony with everyone in their best.

StarDrifter

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 971
  • I never tell people exactly how smart I am
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #16 on: September 24, 2011, 02:35:09 AM »
Football!

UK: football = soccer
US: football = american football/grid iron
Aus: football = footy = rugby league
Aus: rugby = rugby union
Aus: soccer = soccer (althought the football thing is starting to get popular, it will always be soccer to me)

Almost!

UK & most of Europe : football = soccer
US : football = american football/grid iron
NZ : football = rugby (union)
Aus (Queensland/New South Wales/Capital/parts of the Northern Territory): football = rugby league/union
Aus (Victoria, Tasmania, parts of South Australia & Western Australia): football = Australian Rules Football, the Grand Final of which is next week at the MCG.

A lot of countries outside the EU refer to 'European Football' as soccer. There was a great graph on graphjam about this the other week... must see if I can find it...
... it might frighten them.
Victoria,

oz diva

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1143
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #17 on: September 24, 2011, 04:12:09 AM »
Football!

UK: football = soccer
US: football = american football/grid iron
Aus: football = footy = rugby league
Aus: rugby = rugby union
Aus: soccer = soccer (althought the football thing is starting to get popular, it will always be soccer to me)

They play rugby in the Northern states of Australia, but to me Football aka footy is Australian Rules Football, not rugby. (I'm Victorian)


We don't say we 'root' for a team, in Victoria we 'barrack'. Rooting is another word for 'scrabble'  ;D

My BIL got into trouble in England when his registration sticker had become detached from the windshield, when questioned by the policeman he said the durex slipped. He meant glue/sticky tape, but in England a condom is called a durex. (or at least I believe it used to be) this was about 35 years ago.

Do the American members use the word fortnight?

Victoria

Hollanda

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2643
  • Believe in yourself.
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #18 on: September 24, 2011, 04:43:05 AM »
Football!

UK: football = soccer
US: football = american football/grid iron
Aus: football = footy = rugby league
Aus: rugby = rugby union
Aus: soccer = soccer (althought the football thing is starting to get popular, it will always be soccer to me)

They play rugby in the Northern states of Australia, but to me Football aka footy is Australian Rules Football, not rugby. (I'm Victorian)


We don't say we 'root' for a team, in Victoria we 'barrack'. Rooting is another word for 'scrabble' ;D

My BIL got into trouble in England when his registration sticker had become detached from the windshield, when questioned by the policeman he said the durex slipped. He meant glue/sticky tape, but in England a condom is called a durex. (or at least I believe it used to be) this was about 35 years ago.

Do the American members use the word fortnight?

I only knew the "rooting" thing when I heard Kevin ****** Wilson's "She's the Sort of Sheila for Me"...I love his stuff, I find him hilariously funny, if a little bit insulting!
Time flies like an arrow.
Fruit flies like a banana.


oz diva

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1143
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #19 on: September 24, 2011, 04:47:02 AM »
Football!

UK: football = soccer
US: football = american football/grid iron
Aus: football = footy = rugby league
Aus: rugby = rugby union
Aus: soccer = soccer (althought the football thing is starting to get popular, it will always be soccer to me)

They play rugby in the Northern states of Australia, but to me Football aka footy is Australian Rules Football, not rugby. (I'm Victorian)


We don't say we 'root' for a team, in Victoria we 'barrack'. Rooting is another word for 'scrabble' ;D

My BIL got into trouble in England when his registration sticker had become detached from the windshield, when questioned by the policeman he said the durex slipped. He meant glue/sticky tape, but in England a condom is called a durex. (or at least I believe it used to be) this was about 35 years ago.

Do the American members use the word fortnight?

I only knew the "rooting" thing when I heard Kevin ****** Wilson's "She's the Sort of Sheila for Me"...I love his stuff, I find him hilariously funny, if a little bit insulting!
Only a little bit insulting - he'd be insulted to hear that!  ;D

Victoria

Hollanda

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2643
  • Believe in yourself.
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #20 on: September 24, 2011, 05:03:37 AM »
Football!

UK: football = soccer
US: football = american football/grid iron
Aus: football = footy = rugby league
Aus: rugby = rugby union
Aus: soccer = soccer (althought the football thing is starting to get popular, it will always be soccer to me)

They play rugby in the Northern states of Australia, but to me Football aka footy is Australian Rules Football, not rugby. (I'm Victorian)


We don't say we 'root' for a team, in Victoria we 'barrack'. Rooting is another word for 'scrabble' ;D

My BIL got into trouble in England when his registration sticker had become detached from the windshield, when questioned by the policeman he said the durex slipped. He meant glue/sticky tape, but in England a condom is called a durex. (or at least I believe it used to be) this was about 35 years ago.

Do the American members use the word fortnight?

I only knew the "rooting" thing when I heard Kevin ****** Wilson's "She's the Sort of Sheila for Me"...I love his stuff, I find him hilariously funny, if a little bit insulting!
Only a little bit insulting - he'd be insulted to hear that!  ;D

Lol!! I love some of the ones with more swearing in. They amuse me.  One in particular, and I hate the word he uses with a passion, but the song itself is just hilarious.  I don't really want to post the name of the song, but I think you can guess which one!! I'd love to see him live! :)
Time flies like an arrow.
Fruit flies like a banana.


marcel

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2013
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2011, 06:30:22 AM »
Let me do some Dutch words.

I once shocked some people on an E-hell thread when I was talking about panties in a thread about pantyhose. :-[ (There are more languages in which pantyhose are called panties, so somebody quickly figured out what I meant and posted it)

On used car lots you will see big signs here saying OCCASION. WHen driving by one once with my American ex-GF, I for some reason read the sign out loud pronouncing it correctly with a French accent. See thought that I was joking with funny accents, and that is when I realized that she read it as the English word.
occasion (eng): occurence
(d')occasion (fr): 2nd hand car
Wherever you go..... There you are.

Dazi

  • like the flower
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4215
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #22 on: September 24, 2011, 09:21:21 AM »
An eraser is a rubber in the UK.
A rubber is the US is condom.

I was quite confused when I heard a child tell his mother he needed rubbers...he couldn't been more than 10.  His mother corrected that here we call them erasers. 
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6794
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #23 on: September 24, 2011, 09:44:53 AM »
Cider.

In the US cider is an unfiltered apple juice that can be enjoyed by people of all ages. 

What people in the UK call cider, we call hard cider.  That's the stuff that contains alcohol.

bigozzy

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2093
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #24 on: September 24, 2011, 10:26:47 AM »
Beer=brown champagne

NestHolder

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1137
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #25 on: September 24, 2011, 10:52:33 AM »
Thanks for the input.  It's always good to learn these nuances.

What came to pick us up was in no way a mini-cab.  It was a good, big car that that did exactly what we wanted at a reasonable price.  The driver was identical to the kinds of drivers we know from Brooklyn.  We were pleased with the service and gave him a good tip.

A minicab doesn't mean that it's a small car - it refers (I think) to the style of service offered.  I would be very startled if I booked a minicab and literally got a mini coming to pick me up!  :-)

Elfmama

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6158
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #26 on: September 24, 2011, 11:00:04 AM »
Do the American members use the word fortnight?
I don't think I've ever heard it in conversation.  Once in a rare while you'll see it in books, generally said by a British character. 

An eraser is a rubber in the UK.
A rubber is the US is condom.

I was quite confused when I heard a child tell his mother he needed rubbers...he couldn't been more than 10.  His mother corrected that here we call them erasers.
Or when I was a child in California, 'rubbers' were  rubber boots that go on over your shoes. Fine for rain, pretty darned useless for snow.  (UK = wellies.)

Has anyone covered "jumper"?
« Last Edit: September 24, 2011, 11:01:58 AM by Elfmama »
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
It's true. Money can't buy happiness.  You have to turn it
into books first.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Linley

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1587
  • My life is not a democracy, YOU do not get a vote.
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #27 on: September 24, 2011, 11:05:11 AM »

On used car lots you will see big signs here saying OCCASION. When driving by one once with my American ex-GF, I for some reason read the sign out loud pronouncing it correctly with a French accent. See thought that I was joking with funny accents, and that is when I realized that she read it as the English word.
occasion (eng): occurence
(d')occasion (fr): 2nd hand car

Similarly, someone I knew, while traveling in France and proud of her French, wanted to ask a local jam maker at a market whether there were any preservatives in the jam. The problem, les preservatifs are condoms. (Another set of acquaintances were first confused and then amused to see this printed on a machine in the train station that ended up containing prophylactics).


I'm the kid who has this habit of dreaming
Sometimes gets me in trouble too
But the truth is I could no more stop dreaming
Than I could make them all come true.

-Cry, Cry, Cry- "The Kid"

Judah

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4769
  • California, U.S.A
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #28 on: September 24, 2011, 11:06:30 AM »
"I'm stuffed" in the U.S. means "I've had too much to eat", but apparently in Australia it means you've had sex?  I was told this by a friend who repeated the phrase in an Sydney restaurant and got funny looks, but it sounds far fetched to me.
Ask for what you want. Let's be clear on this one:
Subtle hints don't work.
Strong hints don't work.
Really obvious hints don't work.
Just say it!

-The Car Talk Guys

RingTailedLemur

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2847
  • Rudeness is a small person's imitation of power.
Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #29 on: September 24, 2011, 11:30:02 AM »
Cider.

In the US cider is an unfiltered apple juice that can be enjoyed by people of all ages. 

What people in the UK call cider, we call hard cider.  That's the stuff that contains alcohol.

Oh yes!  I was shocked on EHell once reading about someone who gave a kid "cider", and no-one leapt in to say, "You gave CIDER to a CHILD?!?!"