Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 95684 times)

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Wonderflonium

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #30 on: September 24, 2011, 11:30:56 AM »
Vest: In the States, it's a sleeveless button-up garment worn over shirts (kinda like a jacket with no sleeves). I THINK in the UK it's a camisole or tank top. Is that right? I was reading Victoria Beckham's book and was super confused by her use of the word vest.
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Judah

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #31 on: September 24, 2011, 11:33:54 AM »
Vest: In the States, it's a sleeveless button-up garment worn over shirts (kinda like a jacket with no sleeves). I THINK in the UK it's a camisole or tank top. Is that right? I was reading Victoria Beckham's book and was super confused by her use of the word vest.

Oh, yes! Jumper is another one that used to confuse me. Fortunately, I'd figured out the meaning by the time a real live person used the word with me.
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Mopsy428

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #32 on: September 24, 2011, 11:43:44 AM »
Bum.  US = worthless, lazy person (the meaning of 'hobo' is rarely used nowdays).  As a verb,  sponging off another.  "My nephew is such a bum, he can't hold a job because he can't be bothered to get up and go to work.  He just bums money from his parents."

UK = the part of the body you sit on.
I didn't know that "bum" was British slang! (I just looked it up in the dictionary.) I hear "bum" used for "buttocks" all the time in the US.

Thipu1

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #33 on: September 24, 2011, 01:10:18 PM »
Ah yes.  Vest versus waistcoat.  That's always fun.

In the UK a vest is what we in the US would call an undershirt. On both sides of the Pond it might be called a 'singlet.  These days, it's often called a 'wife-Beater'. 

The vest n the US is a much more polite garment.  It is part of a three-piece suit.  It is made to be seen and is sometimes adorned with a fine watch fob.  That sort of garment people in the UK would call a waistcoat. 

Hollanda

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #34 on: September 24, 2011, 01:12:47 PM »
My favourite is still fanny...I think I just have a mind like a sewer lol!!!  >:D
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Sharnita

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #35 on: September 24, 2011, 08:16:37 PM »
Thongs!

In Trinidad thongs are underwear.
In Australia thongs are summer slippers. This electrified the Trinidadian guests at my cousin's wedding in Australia. The priest was making some point or other and referenced the rehearsal with the wedding party in jeans and thongs and the wedding ceremony with everyone in their best.
Thongs are both in the US

Wonderflonium

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #36 on: September 24, 2011, 08:28:17 PM »
True, but at least where I am, people don't refer to flip-flops as thongs. I'm familiar with the usage but have never heard anyone in this region (east coast) actually use it.
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Bethczar

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #37 on: September 24, 2011, 09:22:46 PM »
Cab and taxi. 

Here in NYC, they both mean the sort of metered vehicle that you hail on the street.  If you need a car to pick you up at a specified time and deliver you to a specified place at a previously agreed upon price, you call a car service.  The driver will pick you up at 7:30 AM and drive you to terminal 3 at La Guardia for 30 USD.  That's how it works.

US girl here - never heard of a car service. A cab (or taxi) is the word here for both functions.

dawnfire

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #38 on: September 25, 2011, 12:04:42 AM »
Football!

UK: football = soccer
US: football = american football/grid iron
Aus: football = footy = rugby league
Aus: rugby = rugby union
Aus: soccer = soccer (althought the football thing is starting to get popular, it will always be soccer to me)

you also forgot aussie rules football

dawnfire

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #39 on: September 25, 2011, 12:12:53 AM »
bush

Australia- The easiest way to describe it is forest land. heavily treed with eucalpts and very prone to fire in the summer months.

US- a hair down south

Elfmama

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #40 on: September 25, 2011, 01:16:29 AM »
bush

Australia- The easiest way to describe it is forest land. heavily treed with eucalpts and very prone to fire in the summer months.

US- a hair down south
Except in Alaska, where the Aussie meaning is identical (except for the kind of tree.  No eucalyptus in Alaska.)  Those guys who fly small planes to deliver a few people and/or small amounts of cargo are bush pilots.
« Last Edit: September 25, 2011, 01:18:42 AM by Elfmama »
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Mopsy428

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #41 on: September 25, 2011, 01:40:32 AM »
Ah yes.  Vest versus waistcoat.  That's always fun.

In the UK a vest is what we in the US would call an undershirt. On both sides of the Pond it might be called a 'singlet.  These days, it's often called a 'wife-Beater'. 

The vest n the US is a much more polite garment.  It is part of a three-piece suit.  It is made to be seen and is sometimes adorned with a fine watch fob.  That sort of garment people in the UK would call a waistcoat.
A vest can also be a type of outer garment with no sleeves that's not part of a three piece suit, like a fishing vest, a bullet proof vest or a winter vest.

Leafy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #42 on: September 25, 2011, 06:14:48 AM »
"I'm stuffed" in the U.S. means "I've had too much to eat", but apparently in Australia it means you've had sex?  I was told this by a friend who repeated the phrase in an Sydney restaurant and got funny looks, but it sounds far fetched to me.

As an Aussie I'm calling "rubbish" on this one. I've only ever used, and heard, "stuffed" to mean either really full or really tired.

In reference to fortnight - I had never realised that this was not a universally used term Fascinating!

I have noticed that people in the US will reference a time by the season, e.g. last summer, next winter. Now I'm not sure if it's a regional thing, but I tend to find that people here will tend to refer to the month, e.g. in July, last December. What do other countries do?

Hollanda

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #43 on: September 25, 2011, 06:46:40 AM »
in the UK, we say fortnight. I have noticed "bi-monthly" now, as well as "bi-annually", which I have never noticed before.

Also "Mooning"...in the UK it is slang for showing one's behind. In the US I believe it means pining after someone?
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katycoo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #44 on: September 25, 2011, 07:56:41 AM »
"Bailiff"

In the UK this is someone who comes to your house and takes your property for non-payment of debts (in the US this is a repo man, I think).  In the US I think this applies to some kind of court official?

In Australia, that's the Sheriff.

Cab and taxi. 

Here in NYC, they both mean the sort of metered vehicle that you hail on the street.  If you need a car to pick you up at a specified time and deliver you to a specified place at a previously agreed upon price, you call a car service.  The driver will pick you up at 7:30 AM and drive you to terminal 3 at La Guardia for 30 USD.  That's how it works. 

The Last time we were in London we needed help getting our luggage from the hotel to the train station.  We asked the desk clerk to call us a car service.  Se looked at us as though we had just landed from Mars. 

It was interesting to learn that in London, a taxi is what you hail on the street.  A cab is the equivalent of what we call a car service. 


Did not know that about UK cabs.  In Aus, cab and taxi both mean as they do in NY.  I am not aware of any fixed fee car service being available here.