Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 100446 times)

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Elfmama

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #60 on: September 25, 2011, 11:26:33 AM »
In addition, there is this contraption, also called a jumper:


Out of the picture there is a heavy clamp that you affix to a door-lintel or an overhead beam.  It lets a pre-walking baby exercise her legs.  My kids loved theirs.
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Thipu1

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #61 on: September 25, 2011, 11:32:32 AM »
We call those baby things jumpers as well.

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #62 on: September 25, 2011, 11:50:54 AM »
Jumper.

In the UK it describes the garment we, in the US, would call a 'pull-over sweater'. 

Here, a 'jumper' is a very different sort of garment.  It's a loose, sleeveless dress usually made of a heavy fabric such as wool or corduroy.  The jumper is always worn over a turtleneck or a long sleeved blouse.

  When made of velvet, the jumper is the dress of choice for young girls at winter holiday parties.  It's reasonably warm.  It's more comfortable than a standard party dress.  It also looks much neater than a skirt and blouse. 

Because it's so practical, I have no doubt that what we call a jumper is often used in the UK.  However, I have no idea what it is called there.

We'd call one of those a pinafore, or pinafore dress. They're actually not as ubiquitous in the UK as they are in the US - whilst you do see them sometimes on younger girls, they're mostly associated with primary school uniforms (see link).

Miss Vertigo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #63 on: September 25, 2011, 12:59:44 PM »
In addition, there is this contraption, also called a jumper:


Out of the picture there is a heavy clamp that you affix to a door-lintel or an overhead beam.  It lets a pre-walking baby exercise her legs.  My kids loved theirs.

Ah. A 'baby bouncer' here.

Disclaimer: not a parent, don't play one on TV, could be talking cobblers, but that's what I remember my parents calling mine.

Hollanda

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #64 on: September 25, 2011, 02:41:10 PM »
In addition, there is this contraption, also called a jumper:


Out of the picture there is a heavy clamp that you affix to a door-lintel or an overhead beam.  It lets a pre-walking baby exercise her legs.  My kids loved theirs.

Ah. A 'baby bouncer' here.

Disclaimer: not a parent, don't play one on TV, could be talking cobblers, but that's what I remember my parents calling mine.

Apparently I used to do the screaming ab-dabs when my mum tried to get me out of mine lol.
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Elfmama

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #65 on: September 25, 2011, 08:44:22 PM »
Jumper.

In the UK it describes the garment we, in the US, would call a 'pull-over sweater'. 

Here, a 'jumper' is a very different sort of garment.  It's a loose, sleeveless dress usually made of a heavy fabric such as wool or corduroy.  The jumper is always worn over a turtleneck or a long sleeved blouse.

  When made of velvet, the jumper is the dress of choice for young girls at winter holiday parties.  It's reasonably warm.  It's more comfortable than a standard party dress.  It also looks much neater than a skirt and blouse. 

Because it's so practical, I have no doubt that what we call a jumper is often used in the UK.  However, I have no idea what it is called there.

We'd call one of those a pinafore, or pinafore dress. They're actually not as ubiquitous in the UK as they are in the US - whilst you do see them sometimes on younger girls, they're mostly associated with primary school uniforms (see link).
Yes, we would call those jumpers.  What most of the US calls a pinafore is a somewhat different item of clothing, a ruffly apron, now usually white eyelet, worn by little girls over a party dress:

In the past, they were often worn for utility reasons, and then they were made of more practical fabric like gingham or calico:

You can see that there is no fabric from armpit to waist, and the skirt is gathered to a waistband, rather than the A-line of a US jumper/UK pinafore. 
« Last Edit: September 25, 2011, 08:50:14 PM by Elfmama »
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katycoo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #66 on: September 25, 2011, 09:10:26 PM »
^^^ See, I'd call that an apron.

A pinafore is a dress where the top half is like overalls - a bib and back straps which come up over the shoulders to hold the bib up.

gramma dishes

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #67 on: September 25, 2011, 09:22:19 PM »
It sounds like what some of you are calling a "car service" is what we call a limousine.  It's usually fancier (and more expensive) than a cab/taxi.  They can range in size from a large ordinary car (usually black or white) to an extra length vehicle complete with a wet bar, TV and other amenities.  The cost is usually set in advance of your ride.

RainhaDoTexugo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #68 on: September 25, 2011, 09:58:27 PM »
The most interesting part of this thread is how often I find myself disagreeing with my fellow Americans ;D 

I would use taxi and cab interchangeably (the full name of that particular vehicle is actually "taxi cab"), whether I hailed it on the street or called for it.  A car service is a pre-scheduled, fixed rate kind of thing, like the limousine service described above - we'd use the term limo service more often than car service here in Chicago.

We definitely refer to our natural gas used for heating and cooking as gas.  Maybe the Yahoo Answers person lived somewhere with predominantly electric heating and cooking?  Or maybe he was that special brand of stupid you only get on Yahoo Answers ;)

I call any sort of shoe designed for sports a gym shoe, or perhaps a sneaker.  I seem to be unusual in that, though.   I think that's both generational and regional.  I would use tennis shoe specifically for those canvas shoes.  These are pumps:  http://www.6pm.com/softspots-sherise-black-velvet-sheep-nappa

I still hear bum as in hobo regularly.  I think there's a general trend more towards just saying homeless guy/lady, though.  I do hear and use "can I bum a *whatever*" here.

Thong was used for flip flops much more often when I was a kid.  I'd know what someone meant referring to thong sandals, but my first thought would be underwear.

Pants are trousers, but a man might refer to his shorts and mean his boxers.  You'd have to pay attention to the context.

We definitely don't use fortnight.  I only really encounter it in books and foreign media.

Durex is a brand of condom, by the way.  I wouldn't say "I need a Durex" in the way I'd say "I need a Kleenex," but maybe English people do.  Rubbers are a synonym for galoshes - rubber boots that keep the rain out.

Bush isn't just the hair down south ;). It's also a particular type of plant.  I'm pretty sure that usage is international, though, and dawnfire was just being goofy.

If I say "last summer" instead of "last July," it's often because I don't really remember what month it was ;)

I use mooning strictly in the sense of illicit butt presentation.  I would recognize "mooning after" someone if I saw it, but I don't know anyone who uses it.  If I was feeling old fashioned, I'd use "pining after" or "pining away for."

Jumper:



Pinafore:



Aprons:





Half apron:


Wonderflonium

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #69 on: September 25, 2011, 10:04:02 PM »
I so want that brown and pink polka dot apron.
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oz diva

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #70 on: September 25, 2011, 10:23:18 PM »
Jumper.

In the UK it describes the garment we, in the US, would call a 'pull-over sweater'. 
 

Funny family story hijack. When my sister and her husband were young and carefree they went to live in Mozambique with their baby daughter, as you do. Anyway my BIL was walking along the road and he met a man with his son in his arms. That's a nice baby says the man what's her name, Jessie, says BIL. The man laughs out loud at that because in Moz, a Jessie was a jersey/jumper. So BIL asks the man what his son is called "Cupoftea" says the man.  ;D


Victoria

lollylegs

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #71 on: September 25, 2011, 10:58:57 PM »
Vest: In the States, it's a sleeveless button-up garment worn over shirts (kinda like a jacket with no sleeves). I THINK in the UK it's a camisole or tank top. Is that right? I was reading Victoria Beckham's book and was super confused by her use of the word vest.

Oh, yes! Jumper is another one that used to confuse me. Fortunately, I'd figured out the meaning by the time a real live person used the word with me.

I used to get so confused reading The Baby Sitters club books when I was younger. They'd describe how the character was wearing a shirt and a jumper and I'd think, "Where are her pants?!"

katycoo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #72 on: September 25, 2011, 11:03:37 PM »
Durex is a brand of condom, by the way.  I wouldn't say "I need a Durex" in the way I'd say "I need a Kleenex," but maybe English people do.  Rubbers are a synonym for galoshes - rubber boots that keep the rain out.

Actually reference to brand names over a generic product name is fairly American IME.

The only common exception I can think of is White Out (or Tippex to kiwis).  I've never heard anyone call it correction fluid.

But we would say tissue over Kleenex, and vacuum over Hoover.

bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #73 on: September 26, 2011, 03:59:27 AM »
Jumper.

In the UK it describes the garment we, in the US, would call a 'pull-over sweater'. 

Here, a 'jumper' is a very different sort of garment.  It's a loose, sleeveless dress usually made of a heavy fabric such as wool or corduroy.  The jumper is always worn over a turtleneck or a long sleeved blouse.

  When made of velvet, the jumper is the dress of choice for young girls at winter holiday parties.  It's reasonably warm.  It's more comfortable than a standard party dress.  It also looks much neater than a skirt and blouse. 

Because it's so practical, I have no doubt that what we call a jumper is often used in the UK.  However, I have no idea what it is called there.


In Australia they managed to cross breed sheep and kangaroos, the resulting fleece makes excellent wooly jumpers, baboom tish

When I told this silly joke to my then 5 year old American niece I got nothing. At least my kids moaned.

oz diva

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #74 on: September 26, 2011, 04:09:12 AM »
Durex is a brand of condom, by the way.  I wouldn't say "I need a Durex" in the way I'd say "I need a Kleenex," but maybe English people do.  Rubbers are a synonym for galoshes - rubber boots that keep the rain out.

Actually reference to brand names over a generic product name is fairly American IME.

The only common exception I can think of is White Out (or Tippex to kiwis).  I've never heard anyone call it correction fluid.

But we would say tissue over Kleenex, and vacuum over Hoover.

What about biros?

Victoria