Author Topic: Different Meanings for Words  (Read 95654 times)

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #75 on: September 26, 2011, 04:32:59 AM »
"I'm stuffed" in the U.S. means "I've had too much to eat", but apparently in Australia it means you've had sex?  I was told this by a friend who repeated the phrase in an Sydney restaurant and got funny looks, but it sounds far fetched to me.

As an Aussie I'm calling "rubbish" on this one. I've only ever used, and heard, "stuffed" to mean either really full or really tired.

Not sure if this is related, but when my school group went to France, one of the guys got into trouble with "I'm full" - "Je suis plain" (the literal translation) means "I'm pregnant" with a connotation for animals instead of humans.

Something I'm curious about - how many slang terms for "drunk" do you have?  Off the top of my head I can think of several terms which would be interchangeable in the phrase "Let's go get ________!" :

smashed
hammered
plastered
blitzed
sloshed
pickled
wasted
sh1t-faced
tipsy
trashed

I know there are some you Brits use and we don't, but I can't think of them offhand  :P  Do the rest of these translate?  (And for that matter, can you use ANY verb and make it obvious?  Hmmm . . . "Let's get bowdlerized."  "Let's get flattened."  "Let's get impeached."  Yep, looks like it  ;D)

Miss Vertigo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #76 on: September 26, 2011, 04:37:31 AM »
Something I'm curious about - how many slang terms for "drunk" do you have?  Off the top of my head I can think of several terms which would be interchangeable in the phrase "Let's go get ________!" :

smashed
hammered
plastered
blitzed
sloshed
pickled
wasted
sh1t-faced
tipsy
trashed

I know there are some you Brits use and we don't, but I can't think of them offhand  :P  Do the rest of these translate?

'p1ssed' is the obvious one you missed there.
My personal favourite is 'trousered', though.

Quote
  (And for that matter, can you use ANY verb and make it obvious?  Hmmm . . . "Let's get bowdlerized."  "Let's get flattened."  "Let's get impeached."  Yep, looks like it  ;D)

Michael McIntyre thinks so: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xewe4mlX2tc


P-p-p-penguin

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #77 on: September 26, 2011, 04:49:09 AM »
Something I'm curious about - how many slang terms for "drunk" do you have?  Off the top of my head I can think of several terms which would be interchangeable in the phrase "Let's go get ________!" :

smashed
hammered
plastered
blitzed
sloshed
pickled
wasted
sh1t-faced
tipsy
trashed

I know there are some you Brits use and we don't, but I can't think of them offhand  :P  Do the rest of these translate?

'p1ssed' is the obvious one you missed there.
My personal favourite is 'trousered', though.

Quote
  (And for that matter, can you use ANY verb and make it obvious?  Hmmm . . . "Let's get bowdlerized."  "Let's get flattened."  "Let's get impeached."  Yep, looks like it  ;D)

Michael McIntyre thinks so: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xewe4mlX2tc
You can pretty much substitute any word and people will know what you mean!  Another one missing is "wankered".

As Gavin & Stacey fans, my friend and mine's particular favourite, however, is "twatted".  As in, "I'm absolutely twatted." to mean, "I am very, very drunk."
« Last Edit: September 26, 2011, 04:50:45 AM by P-p-p-penguin »

bigozzy

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #78 on: September 26, 2011, 05:01:10 AM »
Something I'm curious about - how many slang terms for "drunk" do you have?  Off the top of my head I can think of several terms which would be interchangeable in the phrase "Let's go get ________!" :

smashed
hammered
plastered
blitzed
sloshed
pickled
wasted
sh1t-faced
tipsy
trashed

I know there are some you Brits use and we don't, but I can't think of them offhand  :P  Do the rest of these translate?

'p1ssed' is the obvious one you missed there.
My personal favourite is 'trousered', though.

Quote
  (And for that matter, can you use ANY verb and make it obvious?  Hmmm . . . "Let's get bowdlerized."  "Let's get flattened."  "Let's get impeached."  Yep, looks like it  ;D)

Michael McIntyre thinks so: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xewe4mlX2tc
You can pretty much substitute any word and people will know what you mean!  Another one missing is "wankered".

As Gavin & Stacey fans, my friend and mine's particular favourite, however, is "twatted".  As in, "I'm absolutely twatted." to mean, "I am very, very drunk."

blootered
steaming
drunk as a lord

P-p-p-penguin

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #79 on: September 26, 2011, 05:10:48 AM »
Something I'm curious about - how many slang terms for "drunk" do you have?  Off the top of my head I can think of several terms which would be interchangeable in the phrase "Let's go get ________!" :

smashed
hammered
plastered
blitzed
sloshed
pickled
wasted
sh1t-faced
tipsy
trashed

I know there are some you Brits use and we don't, but I can't think of them offhand  :P  Do the rest of these translate?

'p1ssed' is the obvious one you missed there.
My personal favourite is 'trousered', though.

Quote
  (And for that matter, can you use ANY verb and make it obvious?  Hmmm . . . "Let's get bowdlerized."  "Let's get flattened."  "Let's get impeached."  Yep, looks like it  ;D)

Michael McIntyre thinks so: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xewe4mlX2tc
You can pretty much substitute any word and people will know what you mean!  Another one missing is "wankered".

As Gavin & Stacey fans, my friend and mine's particular favourite, however, is "twatted".  As in, "I'm absolutely twatted." to mean, "I am very, very drunk."

blootered
steaming
drunk as a lord


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oz diva

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #80 on: September 26, 2011, 05:18:14 AM »
And then there's all the words for vomiting.
Praying to the great white porcelain god
Spew
Chunder
What else?

Victoria

glacio

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #81 on: September 26, 2011, 06:26:27 AM »
An eraser is a rubber in the UK.
A rubber is the US is condom.

I was quite confused when I heard a child tell his mother he needed rubbers...he couldn't been more than 10.  His mother corrected that here we call them erasers.

My brother once asked his kindergarten teacher if she had a rubber he could use. Mom had to have a parent-teacher conference for that one.

pharmagal

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #82 on: September 26, 2011, 08:09:18 AM »
Durex is a brand of condom, by the way.  I wouldn't say "I need a Durex" in the way I'd say "I need a Kleenex," but maybe English people do.  Rubbers are a synonym for galoshes - rubber boots that keep the rain out.

Actually reference to brand names over a generic product name is fairly American IME.

The only common exception I can think of is White Out (or Tippex to kiwis).  I've never heard anyone call it correction fluid.

But we would say tissue over Kleenex, and vacuum over Hoover.

In the lower South Island of NZ - we have twink - not Tippex, or white out.  We have Sellotape, not Sticky tape, we use Vivids not textas or markers and we don't Vacum or hoover, we Lux.


let me clarify that further - where I grew up, that's what we called them.

Also thongs are uncomfortable underwear - Jandals are what we wear on our feet.  And Jumpers in Australia = Jersey in New Zealand.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2011, 08:13:15 AM by pharmagal »

katycoo

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #83 on: September 26, 2011, 09:20:11 AM »
Durex is a brand of condom, by the way.  I wouldn't say "I need a Durex" in the way I'd say "I need a Kleenex," but maybe English people do.  Rubbers are a synonym for galoshes - rubber boots that keep the rain out.

Actually reference to brand names over a generic product name is fairly American IME.

The only common exception I can think of is White Out (or Tippex to kiwis).  I've never heard anyone call it correction fluid.

But we would say tissue over Kleenex, and vacuum over Hoover.

What about biros?

Its just another pen.

Thipu1

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #84 on: September 26, 2011, 09:51:04 AM »
And then there's all the words for vomiting.
Praying to the great white porcelain god
Spew
Chunder
What else?

How about:
Calling Ralph
Driving the porcelain bus
Upchucking
Losing one's lunch
Tossing one's cookies
Chumming (this is a usual term when one gets seasick on a fishing boat)

Yvaine

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #85 on: September 26, 2011, 10:19:56 AM »
And then there's all the words for vomiting.
Praying to the great white porcelain god
Spew
Chunder
What else?

How about:
Calling Ralph
Driving the porcelain bus
Upchucking
Losing one's lunch
Tossing one's cookies
Chumming (this is a usual term when one gets seasick on a fishing boat)

Calling Ralph on the big white phone, even!  :D

Thipu1

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #86 on: September 26, 2011, 10:23:59 AM »
On thongs and biros.

When I was a child, the inexpensive rubber sandals now called thongs were called zoris.  They were a great novelty in the 1950s.  My first pair was bought at a Woolworth's in Asbury Park  NJ.  Why do remember things like this?

In the 1970s, when I first visited the UK, inexpensive ball-point pens were called biros.  We've visited the UK often since.  Over the years, the term 'biro' seems to have fallen into disuse.  Does anyone know why? 


Larrabee

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #87 on: September 26, 2011, 01:02:54 PM »


And someone once told me that in England to "suck up" to someone means something completely different than brown-nosing.

Nope, it means the same.  :)

Teenyweeny

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #88 on: September 26, 2011, 01:27:24 PM »
..."to get boned"

a) to play scrabble with someone
b) to get fired

And someone once told me that in England to "suck up" to someone means something completely different than brown-nosing.

You may be thinking of 'suck off'. Which...yeah...work it out for yourselves.



Betelnut

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Re: Different Meanings for Words
« Reply #89 on: September 26, 2011, 01:32:07 PM »
U.S.:  Stone = rock, or hit with rock
UK:    Stone = a measurement of weight, 15 pounds?

(I'm sure stone means rock in UK too but a stone as a measurement has always mystified me.)
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