Author Topic: Names/Nicknames  (Read 9478 times)

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Marisol

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #30 on: October 03, 2011, 10:58:57 AM »
I understand the Alexander-Sass-Sassy-Sasha breakdown.  Alex-Xander   Xander-Sander depending on how you pronounce it.  Which brings you to all the S nicknames.


glacio

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #31 on: October 04, 2011, 05:39:11 PM »
Spanish also has some very strict guidelines for nicknames (as in if your name is Armando, your nickname is going to be Mando), and most of them make sense. The one that I do not understand is Chewy for the name Jesus. Where in Jesus does the sounds to form Chewy come from? I have asked numerous Spanish speakers and they just shrug their shoulders ad say that's how it is. So does anyone know?

Bethczar

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #32 on: October 04, 2011, 08:57:57 PM »
Spanish also has some very strict guidelines for nicknames (as in if your name is Armando, your nickname is going to be Mando), and most of them make sense. The one that I do not understand is Chewy for the name Jesus. Where in Jesus does the sounds to form Chewy come from? I have asked numerous Spanish speakers and they just shrug their shoulders ad say that's how it is. So does anyone know?
The Spanish worship Chewbacca?  ;D

R_Suerte

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #33 on: October 04, 2011, 09:45:35 PM »
Actually, it's spelled "Chuy."  That short name has something to do with diphtongs or something. 

kglory

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #34 on: October 05, 2011, 04:04:38 AM »
It is not so common as, for example, in Russian, but some names do get shortened:

Jacob - Jass
Alexander - Sass
Juhan - Juku
Anastasia - Naali
Elizabeth - Elts

Interesting - what language is this?  I've never heard these.

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LTrew

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #35 on: October 05, 2011, 05:26:53 AM »
I don't have any good ones, but I'm looking for one!

Can anyone think of a nickname for "Mitchell" that isn't Mitch, Mitchy or Mick?

Also my MIL gave my husband a very short name with no attached nickname because she didn't want anyone shortening his name or using a different one.  What actually happened is that she ended up calling him by just the first two letters of his name anyway, and now he is called something longer than his given name, so it didn't work.

Cyradis

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #36 on: October 09, 2011, 06:21:08 PM »
This isn't trans-Atlantic, but in my husband's home country, nicknames are all kinds of hilarious to your average American.

For instance, we've tossed around the idea of naming a future son "Alexander."  Rather than the typical nickname "Alex" (which I would expect), chances are good all of my in-laws would nickname him "Lek-lek."  I think my husband actually knows someone who goes by that nickname, come to think of it.  He also has a cousin of some sort who goes by "Kiki" (short for "Nicholas").

Then there's the tendency to call people "Boy" or "Girlie" or similar even when they're white-haired with grandchildren.

It's really interesting seeing how different countries are likely to nickname a person, but it seems pretty safe to say that every country has some hilarious conventions. :)

Yes, I know a few women here who have been called, "Baby," all their lives because they were the youngest of their families. Trinidadians often nickname people based on their appearance, habits or circumstances. I know a man who has a scar that looks like service or army stripes so he's called, "Corporal."

MsMarjorie

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #37 on: October 10, 2011, 12:24:53 AM »
I don't have any good ones, but I'm looking for one!

Can anyone think of a nickname for "Mitchell" that isn't Mitch, Mitchy or Mick?


I'd go with Mitz (because I'm Australian and we put zzz's into everything)

bigozzy

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #38 on: October 10, 2011, 04:55:22 AM »
I don't have any good ones, but I'm looking for one!

Can anyone think of a nickname for "Mitchell" that isn't Mitch, Mitchy or Mick?


I'd go with Mitz (because I'm Australian and we put zzz's into everything)

Mitzo?

Mitzo baby?

bigozzy

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #39 on: October 10, 2011, 04:58:34 AM »
This isn't trans-Atlantic, but in my husband's home country, nicknames are all kinds of hilarious to your average American.

For instance, we've tossed around the idea of naming a future son "Alexander."  Rather than the typical nickname "Alex" (which I would expect), chances are good all of my in-laws would nickname him "Lek-lek."  I think my husband actually knows someone who goes by that nickname, come to think of it.  He also has a cousin of some sort who goes by "Kiki" (short for "Nicholas").

Then there's the tendency to call people "Boy" or "Girlie" or similar even when they're white-haired with grandchildren.

It's really interesting seeing how different countries are likely to nickname a person, but it seems pretty safe to say that every country has some hilarious conventions. :)

Yes, I know a few women here who have been called, "Baby," all their lives because they were the youngest of their families. Trinidadians often nickname people based on their appearance, habits or circumstances. I know a man who has a scar that looks like service or army stripes so he's called, "Corporal."


My wife has a friend from school days who came from an African country. Her parents were good friends of the family as well.

A couple of years ago they were all visiting and the mum kept referring to her 48 year old, 6 foot high married daughter as "Sweetbabygirlmine" all blended together. It was very nice actually.

But when I called her that, she punched me. Hard.

ClaireC79

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #40 on: October 13, 2011, 04:42:14 PM »
It is not so common as, for example, in Russian, but some names do get shortened:

Jacob - Jass
Alexander - Sass
Juhan - Juku
Anastasia - Naali
Elizabeth - Elts

Interesting - what language is this?  I've never heard these.

Estonian

I really liked the name Anastasia for a girl but DH didn't like Ana as a nickname, I may have convinced him with Naali (although the baby was a girl so wouldn't have mattered) I believe my daughter's name - Katja is an Estonian short for Katherine (spelling may vary)

jalutaja

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #41 on: October 14, 2011, 03:18:04 AM »
I really liked the name Anastasia for a girl but DH didn't like Ana as a nickname, I may have convinced him with Naali (although the baby was a girl so wouldn't have mattered) I believe my daughter's name - Katja is an Estonian short for Katherine (spelling may vary)

Katja or Katjusha (even more familiar) is the Russian nickname/name. But - as, even if against our will, Estonia has been part of Russia for long periods in past, so it is entirely possible to meet Russian customs while interacting with Estoonians.

Estonianas have both Kati or Kadi as official names and also Katariina (another common name developed from Katariina is Riina or Riin)

And writing this has reminded me how I have overheard my relative Kadi being nicknamed ... Katariina. And this - making a short name longer when endearment is mean, is also common here.

I'mnotinsane

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #42 on: November 02, 2011, 06:54:55 PM »
For Charles, I have heard Chip, Charlie, and Chuck.

And Chaz.

Not to mention Chick.

baglady

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #43 on: November 02, 2011, 07:49:21 PM »
I don't have any good ones, but I'm looking for one!

Can anyone think of a nickname for "Mitchell" that isn't Mitch, Mitchy or Mick?

Also my MIL gave my husband a very short name with no attached nickname because she didn't want anyone shortening his name or using a different one.  What actually happened is that she ended up calling him by just the first two letters of his name anyway, and now he is called something longer than his given name, so it didn't work.

How about Mitt? If you're in the states he might risk getting comments about a certain politician (who is going by his middle name -- he's actually Willard Mitt Romney). But it works as a shortening of Mitchell.

I went to college with a Mitchell whom I called Mitchiepoo -- I suppose that's out?  ;)

BTW, I think it's interesting how nicknaming trends can change with time, not necessarily distance. When I was growing up all the Kathleens and Catherines were known as Kathy or Cathy. Now Kate or Katie seems to be the most popular nickname. Also back then, most Elizabeths went by Beth. Now the younger Elizabeths I meet go by Elizabeth, with the occasional Betsy. Also, Becca seems to have eclipsed Becky as the nickname of choice for Rebecca.
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Bluenomi

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Re: Names/Nicknames
« Reply #44 on: November 02, 2011, 08:21:32 PM »
If Australian can't shorten a name, we make it longer. My sister Rose is Rosie, Grace is Gracie etc.

We then make nickname of the nicknames. So Benjamin becomes Ben which becomes Benny. Naomi becomes Nomi which becomes Gnomie (and the pronounce the G). DH is Gary which some of this friends have turned into Jeff. Gary-Gazza-Gaz-Jazz-DJ Jazzy Jeff-Jeff. They get inventive around here!