Author Topic: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time - Update post 39  (Read 6527 times)

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cicero

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #15 on: October 02, 2011, 10:48:40 AM »
If I were visiting another country I'd be interested in eating the different food from there, not the same stuff I could get at home. DD could ask through facebook if there are any things she can't go without.
why? she hasn't been to the US ever, hasn't traveled on her own before, how is she even going to know what she can't go without... I would ask her or her mom in very general terms what she *usually* has for breakfast/lunch/dinner and if she has any allergies. other than that - just offer her whatever you normally eat.

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NestHolder

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #16 on: October 02, 2011, 03:38:21 PM »
In my experience as mother of a recent teen, the youngster will probably drink Coke anyway.  Although if she asks for Coke, she'll probably mean branded Coca Cola—I understand there are regional variations on what soft drinks (Br version!) are called in the USA.

I can't imagine she'll have any difficulty with the food you offer.  It's unlikely to be unfamiliar (unless you present her with grits).  Make her feel welcome, tell her the rules of the house, and expect things to go well!

EngineerChick

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #17 on: October 02, 2011, 04:21:09 PM »
JoyinVirginia, you have mentioned that the parents are nervous about this trip. 

Do you think it would help them to feel more confident about their child staying with you if you and your family Skype with them before the trip?  It would give them a chance to talk to you and realize that you are a normal family who will take good care of their child.
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Black Delphinium

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #18 on: October 02, 2011, 04:40:23 PM »
 Don't feel bad if she's ready for bed way earlier than you or wants to stay up really late. Je lag/Tim change can do funny things to a person.  :)
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oz diva

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #19 on: October 02, 2011, 08:38:10 PM »
Don't feel bad if she's ready for bed way earlier than you or wants to stay up really late. Je lag/Tim change can do funny things to a person.  :)

So can jetlag and timechange.  ;D  ;)

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JoyinVirginia

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #20 on: October 02, 2011, 11:09:47 PM »
Thanks again, everyone.
NO GRITS in this house, NestHolder! If DH wants grits, he has to order them at a restaurant, or go to his mother's house. I am NOT a grits gal. We usually drink diet coke, I will get some regular cocacola to have on hand also.
I will get DD to work on communicating with guest to see if skyping is an option for them. I think we can skype - I know DD can oovoo. (It is oovoo, right?)
DD did tell me one response - guest likes potatos and really likes "crisps" - which are kinda like american french fries? Or potato chips? Help me out folks!

Thanks for all the great tips so far!
Joyin Virginia

Ferrets

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #21 on: October 02, 2011, 11:54:33 PM »
DD did tell me one response - guest likes potatos and really likes "crisps" - which are kinda like american french fries? Or potato chips? Help me out folks!

US - Potato chips
UK - Crisps

US - French fries
UK - Chips (we only call the long, thin ones "fries")

Hope that helps! :)

JoyinVirginia

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #22 on: October 03, 2011, 12:15:34 AM »
That helps a lot, Ferrets!
Now I feel better prepared, if I just have an assortment of crisps on hand at least the guest will not starve!

Snooks

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #23 on: October 03, 2011, 10:29:50 AM »
Crisps in the UK taste different to potato chips in the states, I don't know what it is but they just do so bear that in mind before you buy a huge selection.  Pringles are the same the world over though!

Ferrets

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #24 on: October 03, 2011, 11:32:31 AM »
Crisps in the UK taste different to potato chips in the states

So does Coca-Cola - IIRC, the USA product contains high-fructose corn syrup, whilst the UK product contains sucrose.

Re: crisps, the USA's Lay's are the same brand as the UK's Walkers; the latter are very popular here (practically the default brand in most areas). I don't know whether they each taste significantly different, though!

Bethalize

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #25 on: October 03, 2011, 11:41:59 AM »
Crisps in the UK taste different to potato chips in the states

So does Coca-Cola - IIRC, the USA product contains high-fructose corn syrup, whilst the UK product contains sucrose.


I was just going to mention this. Everything with "sugar" in it tastes different. I also found American food incredibly sweet and fatty. My American friend cooked a meal and served "healthy"broccoli - with butter and sugar on it!

Having said that, when I was a teenager the USA was the epitome of all that was cool and junk food was my favourite thing in the world. So just being allowed to go to malls and hang out like teens in the movies would have been AWESOME! (Points if you get the number of Americanisms that slipped into that sentence!)



Thipu1

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #26 on: October 03, 2011, 11:51:35 AM »
In my experience as mother of a recent teen, the youngster will probably drink Coke anyway.  Although if she asks for Coke, she'll probably mean branded Coca Cola—I understand there are regional variations on what soft drinks (Br version!) are called in the USA.

I can't imagine she'll have any difficulty with the food you offer.  It's unlikely to be unfamiliar (unless you present her with grits).  Make her feel welcome, tell her the rules of the house, and expect things to go well!

I agree with the grits.  That could pose a problem.

When we sailed with Cunard, grits were on the breakfast menu but they were put with the hot cereals.   A passenger from the UK tried this 'exotic' dish and got a rather unpleasant surprise when he added raisins, cream and sugar. 

The grits really should have been in the same category as fried potatoes.  In our experience, grits are meant to be served with butter and perhaps a bit of salt. 

There could also be a problem with the 'baked beans'.  In the UK, 'baked beans' are what we, in the US would call 'pork and beans' or 'vegetarian beans'.  I can imagine the poor child's dismay when she finds Bush's or B&B on her breakfast toast.  Of course, that could be a normal breakfast dish in New England. 

mechtilde

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #27 on: October 03, 2011, 12:00:47 PM »
Baked beans are Heinz 57 Varieties here.

As for the gun issue- I'm in the UK and very few people have them here. Those who do have to keep them securely locked upo at all times in a special cabinet when not in use. One of my neighbours goes shooting and I've seen her gun precisely once. The first time I saw an armed police officer was when I was 14 and landed in Munich airport in Germany. I've never seen an armed officer here.

I live in a small village in the country, and yes, I do know people who go out shooting- but you just don't see them, so yes, she might be a bit surprised or nervous when she sees them.

Food might be an issue if she's not used to trying new foods, but to be honest I don't think the difference is any greater betwwen the US and UK than it is between Germany and the UK. She might be under the impression that all US food is KFC and McDonalds though! That said, she might find the portion sizes in restaurants a bit of a culture shock, and you might need to warn her how big a "Medium" actually is!"
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marcel

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #28 on: October 03, 2011, 12:01:28 PM »
I would not change what youe eat or drink to English foods/drinks. An important part of going to another country and staying with hosts is getting to know the other culture.

Just provided good meals three times a day, do make sure if your household is so that people just grab something that she will do this as well, or make sure that you/your daughter offer to her when you get something for yourself.

Also I wouldn't go too adventurous on flavours/spices with meals provided (at least for the first few days.)

If I were visiting another country I'd be interested in eating the different food from there, not the same stuff I could get at home. DD could ask through facebook if there are any things she can't go without.
why? she hasn't been to the US ever, hasn't traveled on her own before, how is she even going to know what she can't go without... I would ask her or her mom in very general terms what she *usually* has for breakfast/lunch/dinner and if she has any allergies. other than that - just offer her whatever you normally eat.
Never having been to the US is not the same as never having been to other countries. Even if I had never traveled on my own, I would still know what I'd really hate to do without. And traveling and knowing what you really hate to do without are two completely unrelated things anyway.
Wherever you go..... There you are.

EmmaJ.

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Re: Hosting a British teen coming to US for the first time
« Reply #29 on: October 03, 2011, 12:45:42 PM »
My neighbor hosted a student from Germany.  They were watching TV one evening and Debbie prepared some popcorn for everyone. 

He was horrifed - HORRIFIED - that the popcorn was buttered and salted.  Apparently he'd only ever had sugared popcorn.  Now that would horrify me!   :)