Author Topic: Bread machine recipes  (Read 808 times)

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buvezdevin

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Bread machine recipes
« on: October 02, 2011, 03:13:24 PM »
I recently bought a Cuisinart convection bread machine which will make loaves up to 2 pounds.  While I have periodically baked bread before, with pleasing results (not necessarily stellar), I have never used a bread machine before today (first loaf is rising now).  The machine was an impulse buy because I saw a new one in box at Ross marked down to $25, so I didn't do the research I usually do before such a purchase, and just did a quick check on its Amazon reviews, then bought it.

Soooo, anyone with a bread machine have some recommendations, advice, tips for bread recipes, or recipe books?

Our favorite type of bread is a bit dense, chewy texture crisp crust - Whole Foods Panne Bello loaf is a good example - but with a new kitchen toy, I am open to all suggestions.
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doodlemor

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Re: Bread machine recipes
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2011, 03:57:19 PM »
My bread machine is old and decrepit, but it still works beautifully on the dough cycle.  I mostly make homemade pizza dough, rolls, and Swedish cinnamon buns.  If you have a dough cycle and want those recipes I'd be glad to post.

Very often bread machines come with a recipe booklet.  If so, and you have a dough cycle, you can make just about anything you find in a cookbook.  All you need to do is to make the dough from the bread machine cookbook and finish it like the regular recipe says. 

You might need to tweak the amount of fillings a bit, using the amount of flour in each recipe as a guide.

buvezdevin

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Re: Bread machine recipes
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2011, 04:04:34 PM »
I mostly make homemade pizza dough, rolls, and Swedish cinnamon buns.  If you have a dough cycle and want those recipes I'd be glad to post.

Very often bread machines come with a recipe booklet.  If so, and you have a dough cycle, you can make just about anything you find in a cookbook.  All you need to do is to make the dough from the bread machine cookbook and finish it like the regular recipe says. 

You might need to tweak the amount of fillings a bit, using the amount of flour in each recipe as a guide.

It does have a dough cycle, and I would much appreciate your recipes.  The loaf I am baking now is a Cuisinart recipe, and while they have a good number of them, I am always interested in personal recommendations from cooks/bakers.

I was impressed with this machine's kneading, and may also try some homemade pasta in it at some point, though I enjoy hand kneading pasta in small batches.
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doodlemor

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Re: Bread machine recipes
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2011, 05:17:34 PM »
Hello again.  Recipes coming up, written in the order that I put the ingredients into the machine.

Pizza Dough - This is my latest tweaking - some things are always a work in progress.

1 3/4 c water
1/2 c olive oil  - I have used less oil, but this amount makes it easier to roll out.
4 c bread flour
1 teas salt
1 1/2 teas sugar
1 tblesp yeast  - Put into a little indentation in the flour.

When cycle ends cut into two equal pieces and let rest for a few minutes on a lightly floured board.  Then roll out balls separately with a rolling pin to fit 14 inch pizza pans.  Use as little flour rolling out as possible.  I grease the pans lightly with olive oil.  [Something that I haven't tried, and might be really good, is to just sprinkle them with corn meal.]

Let the dough rise on the pans about 15 minutes.  [More time might be better, I'm not 100% done with this recipe.] 

Preheat oven to 450 degrees.  *Put one oven rack at the top, and the other at the bottom.*

After rising put the unfilled pizza shells into the oven and set the timer for 6 minutes [thereabouts - depends on oven and maybe even altitude.]  After 6 minutes switch the dough between the racks and cook for another 6 minutes.  Remove from oven.

At this point the dough can be frozen for later use, or set away to be used later in the day.

After filling the dough it goes back into the oven again.  This time you should be able to slide the pizzas off the pan as you put them in, and cook them directly on the  oven racks.  Cook for 6 minutes again, then using the pans like big spatulas switch the pizza's positions in the oven for the final 6 minutes directly on the oven racks.

I haven't had good luck with pizza stones, so came up with this method of cooking to get the dough cooked sufficiently in a regular oven.   The pizza crust is a bit like "crusty" bread crust when it is hot from the oven.  I slide it onto a large wooden board and cut it with a large pizza cutter.  It would probably be much less crusty if I didn't do the second baking right on the racks, but we like it this way.

One reason why I bake this twice is that we like a lot of stuff on our pizzas!  Each pizza that I made yesterday was covered with pepperoni, 1/2 lb cooked sausage, 1/2 lb mozzarella, about 6 oz or so of 6 cheese Italian blend cheese, in addition to the sauce and a sprinkling of parm from a shaker. 

Usually I make my own sauce with a 28 oz can of crushed tomatoes, some sauteed onion, garlic, olive oil, and a bit of basil.  That is more than enough for 2 14 inch pizzas.

I like to add things like peppers, olives, ricotta, fresh tomato, flat leaf parsley, and ricotta on different pizzas, too.   This dough recipe is substantial enough to stand up to it all.

If you make this and do some tweaking of your own please let me know how it comes out.  I would especially like to figure out how to make a very, very light crispy crust.   Mangia bene!


Layla Miller

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Re: Bread machine recipes
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2011, 07:12:45 PM »
Oooooh, I love our bread machine.  :D

We use a lot of whole wheat flour in our recipes, but there probably isn't any reason you couldn't use all-purpose instead.

Honey Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

Ingredients

    * 1 1/8 c warm water (110 degrees F)
    * 1/4 c honey
    * 2 tbsp melted butter
    * 2 c whole wheat flour
    * 1 c bread flour
    * 3/4 tsp salt
    * 1 1/2 tsp active dry yeast

Directions

   1. Add ingredients according to the manufacturer's directions to your bread machine. Set "Dough" cycle.
   2. Put dough in loaf pan, cover, and let rise for 30 minutes.
   3. Bake for 30-40 minutes at 350 degrees.


English Muffin Bread

Ingredients

    * 1-1/4 c water
    * 2 c bread flour
    * 1 c whole wheat flour
    * 2 tsp sugar
    * 1 tsp salt
    * 1/4 tsp baking soda
    * 3 tbsp powdered milk
    * 1-1/2 tsp yeast
    * corn meal

Directions

   1. Add ingredients according to the manufacturer's directions to your bread machine. Set "Dough" cycle.
   2. Spray loaf pan with nonstick spray and sprinkle with corn meal.
   3. Put dough in loaf pan, sprinkle more corn meal on top, cover, and let rise for 30 minutes.
   4. Bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees.


Honey Wheat Sandwich Rolls

Ingredients

    * 1 1/4 cups warm milk
    * 1 egg, beaten
    * 2 tablespoons butter, softened
    * 1/4 cup honey
    * 3/4 teaspoon salt
    * 2 3/4 cups bread flour
    * 1 cup whole wheat flour
    * 1 1/4 teaspoons bread machine yeast
    * 2 tablespoons butter, melted

Directions

   1. Place ingredients in the pan of the bread machine in the order recommended by the manufacturer. Select dough cycle; press start.
   2. When dough cycle has finished, turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and roll out 3/4 inch thick. Cut out rolls with a 3 to 4 inch diameter biscuit cutter. Place on lightly greased cookie sheets; cover and let rise until doubled, about 1 hour. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
   3. Bake in preheated oven for 10 to 15 minutes. When rolls are finished baking, brush with melted butter.


Dinner Rolls

Ingredients

    * 1 c warm milk (70 to 80 degrees F)
    * 2 eggs
    * 1/2 c butter or margarine, softened
    * 1/4 c sugar
    * 1 1/2 tsp salt
    * 2 c bread flour
    * 2 c whole wheat flour
    * 2 1/4 tsp active dry yeast

Directions

   1. In bread machine pan, place all ingredients in order suggested by manufacturer. Select dough setting (check dough after 5 minutes of mixing; add 1 to 2 tablespoons of water or flour if needed).
   2. When cycle is completed, turn dough onto a lightly floured surface. Divide into 24 portions; shape into balls. Place in a greased 13-in. x 9-in. x 2-in. baking pan. Cover and let rise in a warm place for 15 minutes. Bake at 375 degrees F for 13-16 minutes or until golden brown.


Calzone or Pizza Dough

Ingredients

    * 1 1/4 c water
    * 1-1/2 c flour
    * 1-1/2 c bread flour
    * 1 1/2 tbsp white sugar
    * 1 tsp powdered milk
    * 1 tsp salt
    * 1 tsp oregano
    * 1 tsp garlic powder
    * 2 tsp active dry yeast
    * 1 c pizza or spaghetti sauce
    * Mozzarella cheese, sausage, and other fillings/toppings
    * 2 tbsp butter, melted

Directions

   1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
   2. Place water, flour, bread flour, sugar, powdered milk, salt, oregano, garlic, and yeast in the pan of the bread machine, in the order suggested by the manufacturer. Select Dough cycle. After cycle is completed, allow dough to rise until double (about 30-45 minutes).

   3a. For calzones, divide dough into 4-6 portions and roll each out thinly on a lightly floured surface. Transfer to a lightly greased cookie sheet, and spoon sauce and other fillings onto dough.
   4a. Fold edges together and seal with water. Brush top of calzones with melted butter.
   5a. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 to 45 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from oven and cool for 5 minutes, then serve.

   3b. For pizza, work onto a pizza pan or stone and top with sauce and other desired ingredients.
   4b. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes, or until golden brown. Remove from oven and cool for 5 minutes, then serve.
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buvezdevin

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Re: Bread machine recipes
« Reply #5 on: October 02, 2011, 07:31:54 PM »
Thank you both so much! 

The first loaf - basic white - turned out really good, but I am much more jazzed looking at the above recipes than the first item out of the machine!

A friend of mine makes the most amazing pizza, and while I have made good pizza dough from scratch, I measure success against my memories of hers and don't come close (we're still friends, but different states and she doesn't measure ingredients so her efforts at transferring recipes are interesting).  Y'all have inspired what I suspect may be a new cycle of pizza efforts for me!  Looking forward to using these, and thank you again!
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blarg314

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Re: Bread machine recipes
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2011, 10:31:55 PM »

One of the keys for bread machines is that you have to follow the instructions carefully, which is very different from making bread from scratch, where you can adjust the amount of flour or liquid to get the dough just the consistency you want, or let it rise for a little bit longer if it's not fluffy enough.

I do love the pizza and pasta settings on mine.  The knead and rise setting is good not only for pizza, but for things like bread sticks, or foccacia.

Sophia

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Re: Bread machine recipes
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2011, 11:11:24 PM »
This is supposed to be like the bread at Steak and Ale.  I don't remember it well enough to say for certain.  You probably already know this, but should really weigh flour.  I can't figure out how to display a table, but copy the recipe into word and insert a column break where I said to.  I've included all convenient gram weights.  It is a really good bread.  I also have a good recipe for caramel rolls (dough cycle obviously)

Squaw bread

MILK
WATER
OIL
HONEY
RAISINS
BROWN SUGAR
BREAD FLOUR
WHOLE WHEAT
RYE FLOUR
VITAL WHEAT GLUTEN   (OPTIONAL)
ACTIVE DRY YEAST
(column break)
7/8 cup
7/8 to 1 cup
3 tablespoons
2 tablespoons
3 tablespoons
3 tablespoons
2 cups
l 1/2 cups
l cup
4 tablespoons

2.5 teaspoons

(column break)
240g

38g
40g


250g
180g
102g
40g



1.  In a blender, liquefy the milk, water, oil, honey, raisins, and brown sugar on high speed. Combine mixture with rest of ingredients in bread pan, select Medium Crust setting and Whole Wheat cycle. Press Start.
2.   Observe the dough as it kneads. After 5 to 10 minutes, if it appears dry and stiff or if your machine sounds as if it's straining to knead it, add more liquid  l  tablespoon at a time until dough forms a smooth, soft, pliable ball that is slightly tacky to the touch.

CRUST: Medium
BAKECYCLE:WholeWheat
OPTIONAL BAKE CYCLES: Standard/SweetBread

doodlemor

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Re: Bread machine recipes
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2011, 01:15:21 AM »
Hi, buvezdevin, back with the roll recipes.  The PP have posted some really delicious sounding things to try.  Mmmmm-mmm.

Dinner Rolls  [as before, in order given]          yield: 24 - 32, depending on how you divide the
                                                                                                                                         dough
1 c milk or half and half
1/2 c butter softened or melted - not boiling hot
2 eggs, beaten a bit first in a cup with a fork
4 c bread flour
1/4 c sugar
3/4 teas salt
1 tblesp bread machine yeast

When cycle is done take out, shape into whatever you want, rise on the pans, and bake.

I have done the cycle in the evening and put it into the fridge overnight before shaping.  It would probably be OK for a day or so in there. 


Swedish Cinnamon Rolls                           yield: 32

This is a slight variation of the dinner rolls, as far as the dough is concerned.  My mother's family was from Sweden, and I've gotten very interested in Swedish cooking in recent years. 

Here is a link to a food blogger in Stockholm, Sweden who blogs in English.  I didn't use her dough recipe, but fill and top my rolls the way she suggests.

http://annesfood.blogspot.com/2007/10/swedish-cinnamon-buns.html

1 c milk or 1/2 and 1/2
1/2 c butter, very soft or melted a bit
2 eggs, lightly beaten
4 c bread flour
6 T sugar, or 1/4 c plus 2 T
1/2 teas salt
1 1/2 teas cardamon
1 tablespoon bread machine yeast

When the cycle is done divide dough in half on lightly floured surface. 

Roll out half of dough to about 18 x 12 ". 

Top with melted butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, and a bit of ground clove.  [I just sprinkle the stuff on.  If you want to be precise you could probably find exact amounts for the "2 cups of flour dough" in a regular cookbook.  I just do this the way that I saw my mother and grandmother do it.  The clove is characteristic of southern Sweden, where my family is from.  Rolls don't taste right to me without the clove, but it is optional.]

Roll up carefully, leaving the seam on the bottom.  Cut into 16 rolls.

Place each roll inside a *cupcake liner*, and place these on a cookie sheet or jelly roll pan.  I used the cupcake liners that are made of aluminum foil and had no leakage problems.  If you use paper liners I think that the blogger's suggestion of also lining the pans with  parchment to prevent a mess is very wise.

[Yes, it really works to just set the rolls in the liners on the pans.  None of them leaked sugary syrup or spilled themselves out of their liners.]

Repeat with the 2nd half of the dough, then let rise until light, about 30 - 60 minutes depending on the temp of your kitchen. 

Before baking, brush each top with an egg wash made with a beaten egg and several tblesp on water.  Sprinkle each with Swedish pearl sugar if it is available.

If the Swedish pearl sugar is not available you could sprinkle with a bit of regular sugar, or *grind up the sugar cubes sold for coffee a bit with a rolling pin*.  I would probably put them into a plastic bag first.

Bake 350 degrees till done.  [The Swedish woman recommended baking them in a hotter oven to be fluffy inside, but I just don't like rolls that brown on the outside.]

Cardamon is expensive.  I wrap the little jar up carefully in plastic wrap and store it in the freezer between bakings.