Author Topic: British vs American cooked breakfasts  (Read 31096 times)

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Maujer

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #45 on: October 05, 2011, 12:32:06 PM »
I'm from the Northeast but me and grits might get married. I used to get them as a side at a diner in Prospect Heights Brooklyn and mix it with their homemade horse radish sauce - incredible.

We went out on to a diner last night and a friend who's also from Massachusetts ordered a dish that included Jonny Cakes. My husband didn't know what it was. I guess maybe it's more of a Massachusetts/Rhode Island thing? He's from CT, but parts of the state are more NY metro area-orientated than New England.

Wonderflonium

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #46 on: October 05, 2011, 12:49:13 PM »
I demand pancakes, hashbrowns, and bacon!!!  ;D
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PrincessInPink

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #47 on: October 06, 2011, 01:33:58 AM »
Southeastern US here:

Shrimp & Grits
Omelets with shrimp, scallops, crawfish or crab
Biscuits & Gravy (the gravy being a thick white gravy with meat in it)
Crabcakes Benedict (Heaven on a plate....yummy!!!)

All of that sounds wonderful. Especially Crabcakes Benedict. I had no idea it existed, but I love the idea!

Wonderflonium

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #48 on: October 06, 2011, 08:09:46 AM »
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)
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Thipu1

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #49 on: October 06, 2011, 10:57:53 AM »
Wait...so no one's mentioned a Snickers bar and a Mountain Dew as the breakfast of champions? ;)

Hehe. I have a FiberOne bar and Simply Orange orange juice (that stuff tastes so much better than Tropicana).

BIL's idea of a Wisconsin breakfast is a can of cola and a slice or two of left-over pizza straight out of the fridge. 

Dindrane

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #50 on: October 07, 2011, 10:19:49 AM »
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)

You're welcome. :)


Wonderflonium

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #51 on: October 07, 2011, 10:20:25 AM »
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)

You're welcome. :)

It was so good, I had it for dinner again last night.  :)
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Thipu1

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #52 on: October 07, 2011, 10:24:43 AM »
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)

You're welcome. :)

It was so good, I had it for dinner again last night.  :)

Hmmm.  We've been wondering what to serve with our left-over meat loaf.  The hash brown concoction with a broiled tomato seems the perfect solution for a Friday night supper.

Wonderflonium

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #53 on: October 07, 2011, 10:39:54 AM »
Last night for dinner I had hashbrowns with cheese, sour cream, and green onions and a side of sliced tomatoes. I blame this thread.  :)

You're welcome. :)

It was so good, I had it for dinner again last night.  :)

Hmmm.  We've been wondering what to serve with our left-over meat loaf.  The hash brown concoction with a broiled tomato seems the perfect solution for a Friday night supper.

So what time should I be there?  ;)
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KenveeB

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #54 on: October 07, 2011, 11:04:33 AM »
Oh my, this thread has me hungry!

My idea of a good breakfast -- again, the weekend/vacation kind, not the quick kind before work -- would be scrambled eggs, sausage or bacon, and pancakes, waffles, or biscuits & gravy.  Plus orange juice, and hashbrown casserole would be a nice addition.  When I was in college, every weekend they'd have brunch with these awesome make-your-own waffles and a toppings bar.  I topped mined with chocolate chips and cherries. :)

Morticia

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #55 on: October 17, 2011, 01:47:33 PM »
I'm from Canada, but Southern breakfasts are awesome. Although, I put hot sauce on my grits, instead of butter, salt and pepper. Is that okay? Can I still have biscuits and gravy? (With hot sauce?  >:D )
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aventurine

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #56 on: October 18, 2011, 01:31:03 AM »
I'm from Canada, but Southern breakfasts are awesome. Although, I put hot sauce on my grits, instead of butter, salt and pepper. Is that okay? Can I still have biscuits and gravy? (With hot sauce?  >:D )

Hot sauce is appropriate with just about anything, my dear.  I'm a Crystal girl, myself




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sempronialou

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #57 on: October 22, 2011, 10:29:11 AM »
We went out on to a diner last night and a friend who's also from Massachusetts ordered a dish that included Jonny Cakes. My husband didn't know what it was. I guess maybe it's more of a Massachusetts/Rhode Island thing? He's from CT, but parts of the state are more NY metro area-orientated than New England.

I live in the Great Lakes Region, and we used to make Jonny Cake quite often when I was growing up.  Now I have a craving for Jonny Cake.  Maybe it was just our family.  Who knows.

Sharnita

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #58 on: October 22, 2011, 10:41:28 AM »
We went out on to a diner last night and a friend who's also from Massachusetts ordered a dish that included Jonny Cakes. My husband didn't know what it was. I guess maybe it's more of a Massachusetts/Rhode Island thing? He's from CT, but parts of the state are more NY metro area-orientated than New England.

I live in the Great Lakes Region, and we used to make Jonny Cake quite often when I was growing up.  Now I have a craving for Jonny Cake.  Maybe it was just our family.  Who knows.
No, my did is a Michigan born and raised guy who calls it Jonny Cake

General Jinjur

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #59 on: October 22, 2011, 11:40:34 AM »
I love blood sausage. When we get a wild hair and go out for an English breakfast, I get double because DH thinks it sounds disgusting. I don't understand this - what exactly does he think is in sausage? And haggis, that's another one. No one will ever convince me that it's any grosser than a hot dog.

When going out for breakfast, I have a hard time deciding between sweet and savory. There are places around here that do wonderful dessert-like pancakes and French toast, but you can inhale 1000+ calories that way and still be hungry. But eggs, sausage, and toast doesn't scratch the itch. So my favorites are the ones that let you order a la carte to get a little of this and that. Failing that, I like a diner that offers the choice of pancakes or toast  :)