Author Topic: British vs American cooked breakfasts  (Read 31891 times)

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Thipu1

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #60 on: October 22, 2011, 05:26:50 PM »
Several years ago, when we were on the QE2, a passenger from Devon got a horrible surprise when he ordered grits for breakfast.  The grits were listed on the breakfast menu under the same heading as oatmeal.  So, the poor unsuspecting gentleman had them with sugar and cream.  :-X

Grits should be considered in the same way as hash browns or cottage fries.  They are not to be eaten with cream and sugar. butter and salt is the approved seasoning.  BTW, for those who haven't eaten grits, polenta is a more solid version of the same thing. 




Nornster

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #61 on: October 22, 2011, 05:34:09 PM »
I have grits with butter and sugar (but not cream) quite often, but my favorite is cheese grits with lots of Tabasco sauce!

Sharnita

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #62 on: October 22, 2011, 05:59:32 PM »
I actually like grits with milk and sugar.

jenny_islander

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #63 on: October 27, 2011, 07:06:16 PM »
Alaskan here.  In general, a big breakfast is something bready, something meaty, something potato-y, and eggs, with a fruit or vegetable or both.  Drinks may be fruit juice, milk, and/or the stimulant drink of choice.  There should be something salty/smoky/spicy and something sweet available.

French toast with strawberries and optional fillip of whipped cream, American bacon (lovely crisp crackly bacon), hash browns with ketchup, orange juice, coffee.

Skillet is a pan of home fries with something extra on top.  Maybe melted cheese, maybe eggs broken on top and cooked sunny-side-up, maybe chopped sausage.  Add a stack of toast with choice of jams and jellies and a drink.

Eggs "any style," stack of white or whole-wheat toast with butter, honey, and choice of fruit spreads, link or patty sausage, hash browns, sliced oranges.

Denver omelet (like a big frittata with onions, peppers, diced ham, and I forget what else), hash browns, blueberry cornmeal muffin.

Delia DeLyons

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #64 on: October 29, 2011, 01:40:43 PM »
We here is rural northeastern Pennsylvania also have the option of scrapple as a breakfast "meat"... Kind of a flat slice of fried hot doggishness.... So good!
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #65 on: October 29, 2011, 01:52:23 PM »
We here is rural northeastern Pennsylvania also have the option of scrapple as a breakfast "meat"... Kind of a flat slice of fried hot doggishness.... So good!

Not quite hod dog style... it's spiced, so it's more of an untubed bratwurst.

Ah, the PA Dutch... much like their German roots, anything that can be shoved into a tube, WILL be shoved into a tube.
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Thipu1

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #66 on: October 30, 2011, 03:18:17 PM »
We here is rural northeastern Pennsylvania also have the option of scrapple as a breakfast "meat"... Kind of a flat slice of fried hot doggishness.... So good!

I love scrapple. It's almost the US version of haggis.  Scrapple  and eggs is almost the most wonderful breakfast in the world.

Sophia

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #67 on: October 30, 2011, 04:29:17 PM »
To me, an American Breakfast must have

  • Eggs in any form
  • Breakfast Sausage, or Bacon, or Canadian Bacon
  • Carb:  Bread/Toast or Pancake etc or tortillas or fried potatoes
  • Milk or juice
  • Coffee

What I love is that some breakfast restaurants allow you to substitute a side of pancakes for the toast. 

Big difference I noticed was that there were these extra things on the plate in London, but the choice was less.  Good still.

Wonderflonium

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #68 on: October 30, 2011, 07:18:55 PM »
When I was a kid, I LOVED scrapple. I liked it sliced thin and cooked extra crispy. Now that I know what's in it, I just can't handle it.  :P
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Doll Fiend

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #69 on: October 30, 2011, 07:36:23 PM »
Um. .  what is Scrapple?

Wonderflonium

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #70 on: October 30, 2011, 07:59:19 PM »
Scrapple is a fine example of Pennsylvania Dutch ingenuity. My people didn't waste anything.  ;D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #71 on: October 30, 2011, 08:05:14 PM »
Short and sweet definition:

Take a pig.  Take everything they use for hot dogs, set it aside.  The rest is scrapple.

And it is GOOD.
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Doll Fiend

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #72 on: October 30, 2011, 08:19:05 PM »
*drool* That sounds so good!  Of course, I enjoy Braunschweiger on a regular basis.

Nuku

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #73 on: November 18, 2011, 04:27:36 PM »
When I was a kid, every once in a while, my grandfather would make fried mush, which sounds awful, but is really delicious. (Think of polenta put in a loaf pan in the fridge overnight, then sliced and fried in butter.) We ate it with breakfast meat on the side and more butter and maple syrup on top. He was from Southern Illinois.

French toast was one of my fave breakfasts as a kid. My mom put plain sugar on hers instead of syrup. It makes a crunchy coating as it crystallizes.  :) I also always liked places that served crepes. It's like a pancake, but sophistimicated.  ;D

In some places in the upper Midwest, you can get fried lake fish with your eggs. (Popular in more old-style tavern-type restaurants.)

Dys

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #74 on: January 23, 2012, 04:01:46 PM »
In our house ( yorkshire, england ) the preferred hot breakfast of choice is ' A butty ' ( sandwich ) containing bacon  / sausage /egg , or any combination thereof.
If feeling sophisticated, then the bread for the butty will be eggy bread. There is a minor risk of burned fingers which is offset by the deliciousness.
There is also an in house debate of ketchup vs brown sauce. Going without is not an option.

Dys