Author Topic: British vs American cooked breakfasts  (Read 30989 times)

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Shea

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #105 on: February 19, 2012, 07:29:09 PM »
If it makes you feel better, I might know what white gravy is, but I've never successfully made it. :) 
Thank you!  It probably doesn't help that I see you speaking (typing?!) about biscuits and my mind automatically goes to the UK biscuit which is more like your cookies - I get stuck on the weirdness of eating them with a savoury sauce of any kind!  A plain or savoury scone (UK version) would go very nicely with a savoury sauce.  Hmm, I can sense some baking coming on this week!

The other thing about biscuits (and probably scones as well) is that the ingredients aren't the only, or even most, important thing about them.  The technique is pretty important as well.  You have to be really careful not to overwork biscuit dough, because like pastry doughs, it gets kind of rubbery and icky if you work it too much.  So it's one of those "mix until just combined" kind of deals, and you don't really knead it so much as just fold it over a few times.
Yep, that's the same with scones too.  I think you might be right with the buttermilk making your biscuits less sweet than our scones too.  I've maybe just missed it, but I don't think buttermilk is as common over here.  I'm fairly convinced we're speaking about variations on the same thing.  I wonder if anyone's posted a biscuits recipe here on E-hell?  I feel I should experiment!

Thank you both, Shea & Dindrane - this has been very educational for me!

For your edification and enjoyment: my favorite biscuit recipe.

Buttermilk Biscuits

Ingredients:
2 cups/16 oz flour
1 tbsp baking powder
2 tsp sugar
1/2 tsp cream of tartar
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup/4 oz butter
2/3 cup/158 ml buttermilk

1. In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder, sugar, cream of tartar, salt and baking soda. Using a pastry cutter, cut in butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Make a well in the center of the dry mixture, and add the buttermilk all at once. Using a fork, stir until just combined.

2. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface. Knead dough 5 or 6 strokes until dough is nearly smooth. Gently roll to a thickness of about 3 cm. Cut dough into rounds with a cookie cutter or the top of a glass.

3. Place biscuits onto an ungreased baking sheet, leaving some room between them. Bake at 450F/230C for 10 to 12 minutes or until the tops start to turn golden. Remove from baking sheet and serve warm.

Enjoy!


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kherbert05

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #106 on: February 19, 2012, 08:19:31 PM »

I like breakfast tacos. Scrambled eggs, cheese, bacon wrapped in a tortilla and hot sauce. If I'm at home I'll make scrambled eggs with cheese, bacon, and grits. 
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PastryGoddess

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #107 on: February 19, 2012, 08:37:33 PM »
MMMM Grits!  I love grits and eat them with butter, salt, pepper, and cheese.  I'll use Sharp Chedder, Parmesan, Gouda, etc.  I also add in scrambled eggs, shrimp, chicken, sausage, bacon, etc


The Grits need to be cooked for a while to make them nice and creamy.  I can't stand the Quick 5 min Grits...they just have the wrong texture to me


Grits are also called hominy and differ from Cream of Wheat / Farina in that the cornmeal is not as refined.

Doll Fiend

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #108 on: February 19, 2012, 10:35:56 PM »
Reading about the grits, gravy, and of course biscuits, is making me think of different Good Eats episodes.

emwithme

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #109 on: February 20, 2012, 08:08:47 AM »
Thanks for the explanation - the recipe for (US) biscuits is very similar to my granny's savoury scones, so now I've got a picture in my head.

We'd have them with melted cheese and tomato ketchup...yummy!

ladyknight1

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #110 on: February 20, 2012, 08:33:56 AM »

I like breakfast tacos. Scrambled eggs, cheese, bacon wrapped in a tortilla and hot sauce. If I'm at home I'll make scrambled eggs with cheese, bacon, and grits. 
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We make breakfast burritos often as well. Cook some hot breakfast sausage in advance and crumble. You only have to add some to the pan before adding the scrambled egg, then top with shredded cheese and salsa. Wrap in a tortilla and you are good to go.

jmarvellous

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #111 on: February 20, 2012, 11:11:29 AM »
In my experience, the main difference between biscuits and scones is density. Biscuits tend to be considerably more moist and lighter. And usually they're cut smaller.

I had a scone for breakfast yesterday that crumbled up as soon as I touched it. A biscuit would be more likely to stay intact.


Dindrane

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Re: British vs American cooked breakfasts
« Reply #112 on: February 20, 2012, 02:27:47 PM »
In my experience, the main difference between biscuits and scones is density. Biscuits tend to be considerably more moist and lighter. And usually they're cut smaller.

I had a scone for breakfast yesterday that crumbled up as soon as I touched it. A biscuit would be more likely to stay intact.

I think some of that could be chalked up to the relative quality/freshness of scones vs. biscuits in the US.  Most of the biscuits I've eaten in the US are made fresh (either by me, or by a restaurant).  Non-fresh biscuits that were made in advance and just heated up tend to be drier, more crumbly, and less fluffy than the fresh ones.

I think the same is true of scones.  The ones you can usually buy at stores or coffee shops are generally not freshly-made.  I've made scones at home (from a King Arthur Flour box mix :)) that were a lot more similar to the biscuits I typically eat in texture.

Ultimately, both biscuits and scones are un-yeasted, pastry-like breads, so that does tend to make them behave similarly.  Both types of bread are, I think, quickly susceptible to degrading (in texture if not in taste) when they sit around for too long.