Author Topic: "You're so young, why on Earth are you parking in the handicap spot?!"  (Read 39916 times)

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JoW

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Re: "You're so young, why on Earth are you parking in the handicap spot?!"
« Reply #60 on: February 23, 2012, 10:23:25 PM »
Neither do I. It's very icy here, and I managed to tear up an old injury while slipping on the sidewalk. I am already dreading the possibility I might slip again and have to walk with a cane for a while. People always seem to think it makes me about 30 IQ points dumber.

Microspikes are an awesome way to avoid slipping on ice/snow!

http://www.amazon.com/Kahtoola-MICROspikes-Pocket-Traction-System/dp/B0010RHW2G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1329786880&sr=8-1

They're not cheap, but they've saved me a few ER trips.

I have these, and they certainly are not cheap, aaaaand naturally I keep mislaying the heck out of them. I haven't seen them since november. I'm terrible at keeping track of stuff like this. Luckily my ankle heard me itching on the internet, and decided it could just heal itself already. Also yesterday most of the snow in my town rained away.
Those things look great.  I have similar but with a lot less metal.  They cost a lot less than those cost.  I got mine at a sporting goods store, in the ice fishing supplies. 

My driveway was a sheet of ice all last week.  I wore them to get the mail. 

Trellia

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Re: "You're so young, why on Earth are you parking in the handicap spot?!"
« Reply #61 on: February 26, 2012, 10:40:30 PM »
I have fibromyalgia and sometimes require a cane to get from point A to point B. One of my best friends managed to combine my love of dolphins and swords into a fantastic metal cane with a dolphin-shaped handle and a concealed dagger for a birthday gift. Unfortunately, it's illegal in most public areas but is very helpful for walking around the block. I have another 4-footed cane that I might have to decorate up as a bellydance-style cane one day. On my bad days I need it to walk, on my good days I can spin and dance with it!  ;D

SeaSprite

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Re: "You're so young, why on Earth are you parking in the handicap spot?!"
« Reply #62 on: March 25, 2012, 01:59:15 AM »
Have you heard of the Spoon Theory (http://www.butyoudontlooksick.com/articles/written-by-christine/the-spoon-theory-written-by-christine-miserandino/)

I find it really handy, especially now I've trained DF to understand that physical, emotional and mental spoons are all on different, but linked, meters.

That is exactly my situation.  Someone (was it you?) emailed me that link in the past.


It may have been me or someone else entirely but I know shortly after I came here i shared it a few times and still do where I can :)
It helped dh and my family a lot. Unfortunately dh has gone down from the stress of me being sick and being the only breadwinner, so now he has limited spoons as well. But we can tell each other "we need to leave soon/in x minutes/because I am down to my last/running out of spoons" I wasn't able to get out this week-our 20th anniversary was this week. I was going to do a twist on something he did for me and get a spoon bouquet.
I had the placard before I had the cane and was barely under 30 at the time and the stares, the snarks, the snipes omy. We still get them and I now have the cane and oxygen tank.
It used to disturb me that many elderly people give me grief over the cane! Some who don't have one themselves-though I never assume that means they don't use one-they may be having a day that they don't need it  and it may be in their car just in case. But the assumptions that they have made about and to me. Most of that occurred before I found this site. I now have 'that's an interesting assumption" in my arsenal.
I caved....

kitty-cat

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Re: "You're so young, why on Earth are you parking in the handicap spot?!"
« Reply #63 on: March 26, 2012, 09:43:52 AM »
I'm currently riding the bus again, and the looks I get for sitting up front... At the end of the day though, my leg hurts to high heavens, and I try to minimize my steps.

I had one lady ask me "are you handicapped?" in a really snotty tone of voice. (Seriously, imagine the mean girls from high school, that's what it sounded like). I have gotten better with my spine though- I looked her straight in the eye and said "Yes, I am." in a flat tone of voice. My cane was sitting *right* next to me too....




NE Florida

Winterlight

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Re: "You're so young, why on Earth are you parking in the handicap spot?!"
« Reply #64 on: April 05, 2012, 04:47:04 PM »

"Sometimes bad things happen to young people, too."


That is my favourite response that I've read here on eHell. Awesome.

The perfect response. Couple it with an icy tone and a, "How dare you" stare.
If wisdom’s ways you wisely seek,
Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
Caroline Lake Ingalls

bopper

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It's good to be Queen

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I have a handicapped parking pass.  I do not look disabled, but I am .  I am subject to many comments, glares, etc.  One woman demanded to know why I was entitled to handicapped parking.  I told her that my doctor decided I needed it, end of story.  She persisted with asking why, saying that I should be reported to the police, etc.  I finally told her that I was under no obligation to disclose my personal medical informaiton to her and that she should feel free to report me to the police.  Then, of course, I lost it and started crying.  I should not have to defend myself against every parking lot vigilante who thinks they can decide who is and is not handicapped.  I have my good days and bad ones, and people like her can really ruin my mood on a good day.

Mopsy428

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I had called my accountant about taking tax deductions for medical expenses. I first spoke with her secretary, and the secretary asked me if I had any changes to my taxes. I explained that I would probably be taking medical expenses deductions. She says to me, "Oh, it's only if the expenses are over a certain amount. It's usually only for people who are really sick or have huge medical bills. You're not that old, and it's good that you are healthy."

I said, "Yes, I realize the tax laws. Also, please keep in mind that I got laid off, and then got major kidney problems, and my health insurance didn't cover many of my expenses. So, yes, I might be young, but young is not synonymous with 'healthy'. So I *will* be taking a huge deduction even though it's only medical expenses over x% of my income."  ::)

Have these people never heard of young people dying young from natural causes? It's not out of the question for sickness to strike young people.

Browyn

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I have a handicapped parking pass.  I do not look disabled, but I am .  I am subject to many comments, glares, etc.  One woman demanded to know why I was entitled to handicapped parking.  I told her that my doctor decided I needed it, end of story.  She persisted with asking why, saying that I should be reported to the police, etc.  I finally told her that I was under no obligation to disclose my personal medical informaiton to her and that she should feel free to report me to the police.  Then, of course, I lost it and started crying.  I should not have to defend myself against every parking lot vigilante who thinks they can decide who is and is not handicapped.  I have my good days and bad ones, and people like her can really ruin my mood on a good day.

You know I never look at the person driving, I look at the car.  If there is no handicap license or tag hanging from the mirror then I might call the non emergency police number.  Otherwise it myob for me.

Bottlecaps

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A family friend was subject to ridicule for being young but parking in a handicapped spot (with the tag hanging on the rearview). An elderly man pulled up behind her and said, "You know, that spot is reserved for handicapped people only!" (He obviously didn't even bother to look for her tag. She said, "My son is handicapped and he is in the store!" He cowered and drove away. Obviously she was under no obligation to disclose why she was parked there, but I think in the heat of the moment, she said what came to mind, which was the truth.

(Back story: Her son was in his teens at this time, now in his late 20s, and he has MS. He has trouble walking because of it and sometimes has to use a wheelchair to get around when he gets too worn out to continue trying to walk.)
"Some of the most wonderful people are the ones who don't fit into boxes." -Tori Amos


JacklynHyde

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Unless I see someone park at the designated spot, point to the sign, and start laughing and twirling a mustache like Snidely Whiplash, I shall assume the driver or passenger needs that spot.


Marisol

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I have a handicapped parking pass.  I do not look disabled, but I am .  I am subject to many comments, glares, etc.  One woman demanded to know why I was entitled to handicapped parking.  I told her that my doctor decided I needed it, end of story.  She persisted with asking why, saying that I should be reported to the police, etc.  I finally told her that I was under no obligation to disclose my personal medical informaiton to her and that she should feel free to report me to the police.  Then, of course, I lost it and started crying.  I should not have to defend myself against every parking lot vigilante who thinks they can decide who is and is not handicapped.  I have my good days and bad ones, and people like her can really ruin my mood on a good day.



When you started crying did that person back off or apologize?

Giggity

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Why dignify these people's impertinence with a response? I'd blink a couple times and ask, "Do I know you?", and walk off. Why talk to them?
Words mean things.

pierrotlunaire0

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I wonder if it would work to fix them with a glare and say, "What gives you the right to harrass a person with a disability?"
I have enough lithium in my medicine cabinet to power three cars across a sizeable desert.  Which makes me officially...Three Cars Crazy

rashea

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Why dignify these people's impertinence with a response? I'd blink a couple times and ask, "Do I know you?", and walk off. Why talk to them?

Because they start screaming obscenities and call the police. At least it happened to me once. Very interesting to have the police show up at my University class (not hard to find me). Thankfully the police office knew me, and knew that I really was just celebrating having a good day so the fact that I was walking instead of using my chair that day didn't mean much to him.
"Manners change, principles don't. It's about treating people with consideration, respect and honesty." Peter Post

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