Author Topic: Your holiday hill to die on.  (Read 264592 times)

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Elfmama

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #735 on: November 24, 2013, 12:43:14 AM »
If I was rich and had a big house, I would love decorating it for the holidays, and by "decorating" I mean I would decide what to use and where it should go, and then supervise other people who were actually doing it. It just seems so tedious to me.
I read once about a woman who kept her tree fully set up in a closet or maybe a storage room.  The lights and all the ornaments were wired on, and the base had wheels.  She just rolled it out of the closet in early December and plugged it in.

I like that lady

I could handle that. I would have the lights and garlands on it for sure. My ornaments tend to be more fragile, so I would probably put those away and get them out every year, but it would be so much easier if the tree was already upright, lit, and garlanded for me!

I bought a pre-lit Christmas tree for basically this reason.  Okay, I don't leave it up with the ornaments all year round, so I do have to put it together, fluff up the branches, and put ornaments on it, but it's close enough.

Actually, I mostly have the kids put ornaments on it.  This is great fun.  The side effect is that the ornaments are all only on the bottom 4' of tree.  The top part usually ends up bare.  I rearrange the ornaments a bit after they go to bed so that it is a bit more even.  :)
And are the popsicle-stick-and-glitter ornaments front and center? :)
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Itza

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #736 on: November 24, 2013, 07:41:11 AM »
Purple comment - my mother actually did broke the cycle of oyster dressing for her family.  We live in a landlock state so oysters are $$$.  The only people in the family that liked oysters were my great grandparents (who were dead several years at this point) and great uncle (in California) who came to Thanksgiving about once every 4-6 years.  Mom refused to make it.  General hue and cry.  Then she asked her aunts and parents (my great aunties and grandparents) if they actually liked it.  Well, NO but we ALWAYS have it.  yesh.   ::)

Oh...we must be related. There was some dish or other that was "always served", but never eaten. Finally one year my grandma had enough and didn't make it. No one liked it. No one. No one even remembered why we always made it. So it disappered. Her brother said "But it's tradition! We pass it around the table and no one takes any!" so grandma got up and handed him an empty saucer plate and said "Here! Pass this around! It's the same BLEEP thing!", so we did. And we still do that. Anytime great uncle comes for dinner grandma says "Hold on! I gotta get my empty saucer" and we pass around an empty saucer. The first time it happened and Partner was there she said nothing, just passed around the saucer afterwards I asked why she said nothing and said "Babe, I know crazy when I see it. The best thing to do is to just not fight it", now we know why I'm really marrying her. The story makes her crack up though...I think we'll do the empty saucer at our Thanksgiving this year.

My husband's now wondering why I'm sat here with my shoulders bobbing up and down with tears streaming down my face.





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MommyPenguin

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #737 on: November 24, 2013, 08:51:45 AM »
If I was rich and had a big house, I would love decorating it for the holidays, and by "decorating" I mean I would decide what to use and where it should go, and then supervise other people who were actually doing it. It just seems so tedious to me.
I read once about a woman who kept her tree fully set up in a closet or maybe a storage room.  The lights and all the ornaments were wired on, and the base had wheels.  She just rolled it out of the closet in early December and plugged it in.

I like that lady

I could handle that. I would have the lights and garlands on it for sure. My ornaments tend to be more fragile, so I would probably put those away and get them out every year, but it would be so much easier if the tree was already upright, lit, and garlanded for me!

I bought a pre-lit Christmas tree for basically this reason.  Okay, I don't leave it up with the ornaments all year round, so I do have to put it together, fluff up the branches, and put ornaments on it, but it's close enough.

Actually, I mostly have the kids put ornaments on it.  This is great fun.  The side effect is that the ornaments are all only on the bottom 4' of tree.  The top part usually ends up bare.  I rearrange the ornaments a bit after they go to bed so that it is a bit more even.  :)
And are the popsicle-stick-and-glitter ornaments front and center? :)

Glitter is not allowed in this household.  :)  That's my *husband's* holiday hill to die on.  Hee hee.  But yes, little kid ornaments all over.  We did this Advent activity last year that has you create an ornament each day for 24 days.  I have 3 kids.  That's 72 new ornaments.  On the plus side, it's a big tree.  And we were actually a little short of ornaments before we had kids.  Of course, in a year or so, Megan will start making ornaments, too.  And then we'll have 96 ornaments each year!  On top of all the professional ones, that is.

SPuck

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #738 on: November 24, 2013, 09:38:25 AM »
I refuse to do a Yankee swap with family. It takes all the fun out of gift giving, and reduces the tradition to an obligation. Once more it is kind of cruel because someone is going to end up with the bad gift, or worse the gift you wanted can be taken away because of the game aspect of the swap.

Daffydilly

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #739 on: November 24, 2013, 11:31:10 AM »
My hill to die on is no unexpected plans on the day of. The one year I made Thanksgiving dinner for my parents and brothers was supposed to be our first quiet one together in years. Just as I pulled a twenty plus pound turkey out of the oven, my dad announces we're leaving in thirty minutes for dessert with extended family. Yes, we were loaded into the car and left my dinner cooling on the counter for "later". Never again.

Luckily, I've married a sweetheart who understands that knowing what our plans are for the day is really important to me.

BarensMom

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #740 on: November 24, 2013, 11:34:37 AM »
I refuse to do a Yankee swap with family. It takes all the fun out of gift giving, and reduces the tradition to an obligation. Once more it is kind of cruel because someone is going to end up with the bad gift, or worse the gift you wanted can be taken away because of the game aspect of the swap.

I agree with you - Yankee Swaps are an excuse for thinly disguised cruelty.

I actually have 3 pre-lighted and pre-decorated trees.  When the time comes, I pull them out of the box, fluff them up and, hey, it's Christmas!

Elfmama

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #741 on: November 24, 2013, 12:53:11 PM »
I refuse to do a Yankee swap with family. It takes all the fun out of gift giving, and reduces the tradition to an obligation. Once more it is kind of cruel because someone is going to end up with the bad gift, or worse the gift you wanted can be taken away because of the game aspect of the swap.
I did that kind of thing at an SCA party every Xmas.  The rule was that the gift you brought had to be something that you would be happy to take home at the end of the day.  Alcohol, premium chocolates, books on some aspect of the Middle Ages/SF/Fantasy, all made appearances and tended to be gimmees.  So no one got stuck with dollar-store junk.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2013, 12:56:16 PM by Elfmama »
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
It's true. Money can't buy happiness.  You have to turn it
into books first.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

JenJay

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #742 on: November 24, 2013, 01:01:27 PM »
I refuse to do a Yankee swap with family. It takes all the fun out of gift giving, and reduces the tradition to an obligation. Once more it is kind of cruel because someone is going to end up with the bad gift, or worse the gift you wanted can be taken away because of the game aspect of the swap.
I did that kind of thing at an SCA party every Xmas.  The rule was that the gift you brought had to be something that you would be happy to take home at the end of the day.  Alcohol, premium chocolates, books on some aspect of the Middle Ages/SF/Fantasy, all made appearances and tended to be gimmees.  So no one got stuck with dollar-store junk.

We've always had that rule too, but someone always breaks it and I swear we always get stuck with the junk. Literally, one year it was junk mail. Another year it was the user manual to something (a printer?). Another year it was a homemade craft decoration thing consisting of a clear glass block stuffed with white Christmas lights, half of which were burnt out. I am done spending $25 on alcohol or good movies or a restaurant gift card to get garbage!

rigs32

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #743 on: November 24, 2013, 01:26:49 PM »
My hill to die on is no unexpected plans on the day of. The one year I made Thanksgiving dinner for my parents and brothers was supposed to be our first quiet one together in years. Just as I pulled a twenty plus pound turkey out of the oven, my dad announces we're leaving in thirty minutes for dessert with extended family. Yes, we were loaded into the car and left my dinner cooling on the counter for "later". Never again.

Luckily, I've married a sweetheart who understands that knowing what our plans are for the day is really important to me.

I don't understand.  Your dad demanded everyone leave to go have dessert with others before you actually ate dinner?  What's the sense in that?  I would have put my foot down and reminded him of all the money and effort that went into that meal and gosh darn someone was going to eat it.

Snooks

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #744 on: November 24, 2013, 01:59:40 PM »
If I was rich and had a big house, I would love decorating it for the holidays, and by "decorating" I mean I would decide what to use and where it should go, and then supervise other people who were actually doing it. It just seems so tedious to me.
I read once about a woman who kept her tree fully set up in a closet or maybe a storage room.  The lights and all the ornaments were wired on, and the base had wheels.  She just rolled it out of the closet in early December and plugged it in.

I like that lady

I could handle that. I would have the lights and garlands on it for sure. My ornaments tend to be more fragile, so I would probably put those away and get them out every year, but it would be so much easier if the tree was already upright, lit, and garlanded for me!

I bought a pre-lit Christmas tree for basically this reason.  Okay, I don't leave it up with the ornaments all year round, so I do have to put it together, fluff up the branches, and put ornaments on it, but it's close enough.

Actually, I mostly have the kids put ornaments on it.  This is great fun.  The side effect is that the ornaments are all only on the bottom 4' of tree.  The top part usually ends up bare.  I rearrange the ornaments a bit after they go to bed so that it is a bit more even.  :)

How to shrinkwrap your Christmas tree

GratefulMaria

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #745 on: November 24, 2013, 05:11:08 PM »
^^^^  That's adorable!!!

I just remembered that DH, DS1 (24), and DS2 (20) have a hill to die on:  our little Christmas tree.  When the boys were little and our house was, too, we had a small tabletop tree.  It's a brave, plastic, artificial little thing, only about a couple of feet high.  Guess who got emotionally attached?  When we moved to our current house ten years ago and had enough room for a full-size tree, I wanted to go all out with a live one and was met with an incredulous explosion of grief-stricken devotion.  The small tree stayed.  :-)

silvercelt

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #746 on: November 24, 2013, 05:56:35 PM »
My sister's hill to die on is having a live tree. For several Christmases in a row I was sick as a dog. MOm thought it was because we were pet sitting for a friend. Told friend we couldn't pet sit.

I was in my room doing homework one evening and started filling sick/having problems breathing. Walked out front to get help. Dad had brought in the Christmas tree. End of that. Mom went to the after Christmas sales and got a wonderful artificial tree.

Next year Sis was really objecting. Again I was in my room with door closed. SIs brought in some pieces a friend had given her from being cut off their tree. Again I can't breath.

The weird part was I had no problem around many different kinds of evergreens that grow wild. I never got cedar fever when I was at university in Georgetown, Texas. Also I would get some houses with live trees and not others. Turns out the problem was a preservative used on some trees.

So Sis's family go to a tree farm, get a live tree without preservative and all is good.

My whole family had the same issue every year when I was a kid.  My mother could never figure out why she and all four kids would have trouble breathing/severe allergy issues every year during Christmas time.  Finally realized it was because of the mixture of preservative and mold on the pre-cut trees.  Now we all either use fake trees or chop down our own at the tree farm.

jayhawk

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #747 on: November 24, 2013, 07:24:38 PM »
^^^^  That's adorable!!!

I just remembered that DH, DS1 (24), and DS2 (20) have a hill to die on:  our little Christmas tree.  When the boys were little and our house was, too, we had a small tabletop tree.  It's a brave, plastic, artificial little thing, only about a couple of feet high.  Guess who got emotionally attached?  When we moved to our current house ten years ago and had enough room for a full-size tree, I wanted to go all out with a live one and was met with an incredulous explosion of grief-stricken devotion.  The small tree stayed.  :-)

This made me smile.

gramma dishes

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #748 on: November 24, 2013, 07:44:43 PM »


...   I just remembered that DH, DS1 (24), and DS2 (20) have a hill to die on:  our little Christmas tree.  When the boys were little and our house was, too, we had a small tabletop tree.  It's a brave, plastic, artificial little thing, only about a couple of feet high.  Guess who got emotionally attached?  When we moved to our current house ten years ago and had enough room for a full-size tree, I wanted to go all out with a live one and was met with an incredulous explosion of grief-stricken devotion.  The small tree stayed.  :-)

Awww!  That's such a sweet story.  Yaaay for Little Tree. 

It obviously represented a very happy time for the men in your life!  I love that they wanted to keep it instead of trading up for bigger, better and fresher.  Good for them!   :)

daen

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #749 on: November 24, 2013, 08:04:26 PM »
I refuse to do a Yankee swap with family. It takes all the fun out of gift giving, and reduces the tradition to an obligation. Once more it is kind of cruel because someone is going to end up with the bad gift, or worse the gift you wanted can be taken away because of the game aspect of the swap.
I did that kind of thing at an SCA party every Xmas.  The rule was that the gift you brought had to be something that you would be happy to take home at the end of the day.  Alcohol, premium chocolates, books on some aspect of the Middle Ages/SF/Fantasy, all made appearances and tended to be gimmees.  So no one got stuck with dollar-store junk.

We've always had that rule too, but someone always breaks it and I swear we always get stuck with the junk. Literally, one year it was junk mail. Another year it was the user manual to something (a printer?). Another year it was a homemade craft decoration thing consisting of a clear glass block stuffed with white Christmas lights, half of which were burnt out. I am done spending $25 on alcohol or good movies or a restaurant gift card to get garbage!
Junk mail? Honestly? I would be highly tempted to forcibly eject that person from the game. (Assuming I could find my spine in the moment, of course, and could do so politely.)