Author Topic: Your holiday hill to die on.  (Read 261087 times)

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cwm

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #870 on: December 02, 2013, 10:47:56 AM »
Quote
I don't eat turkey or sweet potatoes or green bean casserole or cranberry sauce...

~gasps in faux horror~  So... it was just another Thursday night dinner?   ;)

Well, another Thursday night dinner with eight pies for fourteen people. So no complaints at all, really. :)

gramma dishes

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #871 on: December 02, 2013, 11:21:42 AM »
Quote
I don't eat turkey or sweet potatoes or green bean casserole or cranberry sauce...

~gasps in faux horror~  So... it was just another Thursday night dinner?   ;)

Well, another Thursday night dinner with eight pies for fourteen people. So no complaints at all, really. :)

That's cool.  Pies are nutritious, don't you know.  Fruit pies have fruit and we all know fruit is good for you.  Pumpkin (et al) pies have veggies and veggies are good for you too.  Cream pies have milk.  Got milk?  It's good for you. 

Must mention that when I was about five, my fifteen year old brother told me that mincemeat pie was made of dead flies and I believed him and won't eat it to this day.   ;D

Ms_Cellany

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #872 on: December 02, 2013, 11:23:08 AM »
When we visit The Sweetie's parents for Thanksgiving, the holiday dinner is usually Beef & Brew, a childhood comfort food The Sweetie is absolutely nuts over.  (It's a beef roast marinated in beer, then braised in tomato puree with onions. Very yummy.)
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Petticoats

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #873 on: December 02, 2013, 11:31:12 AM »
...    'Just so you know, next time you should probably have a turkey.  Everyone was pretty disappointed'.  ...

Great!!  Even before I finished reading this I was crossing my fingers and hoping he would say something like "Oh, you don't need to worry, Dad.  There won't be a 'next time'!"

Yay for your Son.  In so many ways!!   :)

"I had several turkeys at dinner, and they ate all the ham!"

Oh, well played!  ;D

baglady

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #874 on: December 02, 2013, 11:36:07 AM »
When we visit The Sweetie's parents for Thanksgiving, the holiday dinner is usually Beef & Brew, a childhood comfort food The Sweetie is absolutely nuts over.  (It's a beef roast marinated in beer, then braised in tomato puree with onions. Very yummy.)

Recipe, please?

I love green bean casserole and I'm the one who makes it for our cooperative Thanksgiving dinner every year. Has to be fresh green beans though.
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gingerzing

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #875 on: December 02, 2013, 11:39:56 AM »
Completely agree that these people were incredibly rude, but is it normal not to have turkey for TG? I can understand the assumption that "turkey went without saying". That doesn't excuse their rudeness of course, but I do understand their surprise.

It's not a law. And a lot of people really don't "like" turkey that much, if they tell the truth. It's just ... always done.

That is why this year we had some turkey and ham...my kids don't like the turkey.  But I agree with others, you have to have SOME turkey.

Or not.  My mother doesn't really like turkey. Then again, Mom isn't fond of most poultry. The only reason that she ever fixed any turkey (when Thanksgiving/Christmas was at her house) was because my uncle (mom's BIL) HAD to have it.  And often was moody that Mom cooking a turkey breast just wasn't the same.    Otherwise we usually would just have ham or a nice roast.  Mom also doesn't care for sage.  So if you want your stuffing to have sage in it, bring it yourself.  LOL 

I remember a infamous Thanksgiving of my childhood (in the late 70's) that my folks had HAD IT with both sides of the family for some reason.  So we didn't do Thanksgiving.  We stayed home and we had homemade burritos.  Mom even hand-made the tortillas since at that time they were not something in the grocery stores in small town Iowa.   
(Wasn't a toxic issue, but there was some weird thing that both sides of the family refused that year to take turns or change times for T-day dinner or something.  It got worked out the next year and after)



BarensMom

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #876 on: December 02, 2013, 03:32:32 PM »
Growing up, our family didn't eat turkey on Thanksgiving, we had THE HAM.  My mother would take a lowly Hormel canned ham and turn it into a glorious sweet-savory concoction with pineapple rings that melted in one's mouth.  It wasn't until the sibs married and the in-laws were insisting that there had to be turkey, so Mom told them if they wanted turkey, then they would have to cook and bring it themselves, because she was doing THE HAM.

I almost always cook only a turkey on holidays because DH likes it better, but it doesn't seem like a holiday to me without THE HAM.

cwm

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #877 on: December 02, 2013, 03:46:11 PM »
BarensMom, that sounds delicious.

We have to have turkey and ham. I won't eat turkey (I'd honestly rather go without meat than eat turkey) and sis gets sick from pork, so no ham for her. Green bean casserole can't be made with cream of mushroom soup, as sis is allergic to mushrooms, so it's cream of chicken or celery, which I've been told is just as good. I don't eat it either. I'd rather eat the green beans raw.

Honestly, I'm kind of glad that we've shifted to Christmas breakfast, as there's much less planning as far as allergens. Sis doesn't like bacon or sausage to begin with so we don't have to provide non-pork versions, and then it's scrambled eggs with cheese, cinnamon rolls (homemade, baked the day before usually), OJ, and coffee for everyone. The only part that's non-negotiable is the cinnamon rolls.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #878 on: December 02, 2013, 03:57:45 PM »
All this talk about the Turkey, or not the Turkey, reminded me of a story my great-grandpa told me about the first Christmas he and my great-grandma had together once they were married.

So, great-grandma and great-grandpa both grew up very poor and didn't have two nickles to rub together when they got married. But great-grandma loved Christmas. And she wanted to make her husband the best Christmas dinner she could. Of course the woman barely knew how to cook (her mother always told her to marry the first man who would put up with her cooking, she married the first man who cooked for her instead) and again, no money. But she got herself down to the butcher one day and asked for the cheapest cut of meat they had, which just so happened to be a brisket. Not even half a pound, but great-grandma takes it and is going to make her husband the best Christmas dinner. Except, she really has no clue what to with brisket. She'd never cooked. Never eaten it even. But she had a Jewish neighbor who had mentioned it once, so she went and got the neighbor and asked how to cook the brisket. So the neighbor shows up and tells her it's going to shrink up and she doesn't have enough, great-grandma waves her off, she's make the best Christmas dinner ever, just show her how. She neighbor shows her how and sure enough, the brisket shrinks to about half it's size. Barley enough  for two people to eat (especially my huge great-grandpa). But she great-grandma pushes ahead. She makes her potatoes, her veggies, and even manages to whip a dessert (deep fried dough she called "Elf Ears", which I still love). Great-grandpa comes home and sees the food. A small serving of meat, limp veggies, and delsious potatoes (the woman knew her way around a potato), looks at his young wife who's forcing a quivering smile and says "My word! A meal for a king!" sat right down and ate every limp veggie, picked apart his brisket to make it last longer, and devoured his potatoes, proclaiming at the end that he was so stuffed he wouldn't eat for days!

Now, according to great-grandma, this was by far the worst meal she'd ever made. She even managed to light fire to one of her Elf Ears! Though she did learn how to make a darn fine brisket.

According to great-grandpa, until his dying day, it was far and away, the best dinner he'd ever eaten. And he likes his Elf Ears extra crispy thank you very much.

Every year for Christmas, they had brisket. Eventually bigger ones. Great-grandma taught my grandma (her DIL) to make brisket, she taught my mom, who taught me. We have it every year for Christmas. Other families might have ham, or duck, or turkey at Christmas, but we have brisket.

Hillia

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #879 on: December 02, 2013, 04:23:25 PM »
All this talk about the Turkey, or not the Turkey, reminded me of a story my great-grandpa told me about the first Christmas he and my great-grandma had together once they were married.

So, great-grandma and great-grandpa both grew up very poor and didn't have two nickles to rub together when they got married. But great-grandma loved Christmas. And she wanted to make her husband the best Christmas dinner she could. Of course the woman barely knew how to cook (her mother always told her to marry the first man who would put up with her cooking, she married the first man who cooked for her instead) and again, no money. But she got herself down to the butcher one day and asked for the cheapest cut of meat they had, which just so happened to be a brisket. Not even half a pound, but great-grandma takes it and is going to make her husband the best Christmas dinner. Except, she really has no clue what to with brisket. She'd never cooked. Never eaten it even. But she had a Jewish neighbor who had mentioned it once, so she went and got the neighbor and asked how to cook the brisket. So the neighbor shows up and tells her it's going to shrink up and she doesn't have enough, great-grandma waves her off, she's make the best Christmas dinner ever, just show her how. She neighbor shows her how and sure enough, the brisket shrinks to about half it's size. Barley enough  for two people to eat (especially my huge great-grandpa). But she great-grandma pushes ahead. She makes her potatoes, her veggies, and even manages to whip a dessert (deep fried dough she called "Elf Ears", which I still love). Great-grandpa comes home and sees the food. A small serving of meat, limp veggies, and delsious potatoes (the woman knew her way around a potato), looks at his young wife who's forcing a quivering smile and says "My word! A meal for a king!" sat right down and ate every limp veggie, picked apart his brisket to make it last longer, and devoured his potatoes, proclaiming at the end that he was so stuffed he wouldn't eat for days!

Now, according to great-grandma, this was by far the worst meal she'd ever made. She even managed to light fire to one of her Elf Ears! Though she did learn how to make a darn fine brisket.

According to great-grandpa, until his dying day, it was far and away, the best dinner he'd ever eaten. And he likes his Elf Ears extra crispy thank you very much.

Every year for Christmas, they had brisket. Eventually bigger ones. Great-grandma taught my grandma (her DIL) to make brisket, she taught my mom, who taught me. We have it every year for Christmas. Other families might have ham, or duck, or turkey at Christmas, but we have brisket.

That is the most wonderful Christmas story ever.  I love your family.

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Julsie

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #880 on: December 02, 2013, 04:31:48 PM »
Other families might have ham, or duck, or turkey at Christmas, but we have brisket.

~Says through tears~  It's okay.  It's Christmas.  Enjoy your brisket.  So long as you have turkey for Thanksgiving.  /wipeseyes 

Glittergirl, you sure can tell a story!  Please tell me you write for a living.

gramma dishes

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #881 on: December 02, 2013, 04:35:26 PM »
Other families might have ham, or duck, or turkey at Christmas, but we have brisket.

~Says through tears~  It's okay.  It's Christmas.  Enjoy your brisket.  So long as you have turkey for Thanksgiving.  /wipeseyes 

Glittergirl, you sure can tell a story!  Please tell me you write for a living.

Agreed.  That truly was a wonderful, heart warming story!  A wonderful example of true love and devotion and what Christmas really should be about.  You ARE a great story teller, Glittergirl!

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #882 on: December 02, 2013, 04:38:27 PM »
Other families might have ham, or duck, or turkey at Christmas, but we have brisket.

~Says through tears~  It's okay.  It's Christmas.  Enjoy your brisket.  So long as you have turkey for Thanksgiving.  /wipeseyes 

Glittergirl, you sure can tell a story!  Please tell me you write for a living.

Lol, my mom says it's not Thanksgiving without turkey either (but she loves turkey, she'll eat any time).

And yes I actually do write for a living, though not in strictly creative manner...yet.

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #883 on: December 02, 2013, 04:39:12 PM »
That is the most wonderful Christmas story ever.  I love your family.

They aren't too shabby, I think I'll keep them...for now. :)

GlitterIsMyDrug

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #884 on: December 02, 2013, 04:45:36 PM »
Agreed.  That truly was a wonderful, heart warming story!  A wonderful example of true love and devotion and what Christmas really should be about.  You ARE a great story teller, Glittergirl!

I loved my great-grandparents, I've always felt very blessed I got to know them (she died when I was around 9ish, maybe 10, he when I was about 13). They fought like all couples, she locked him out on the porch one night because he came home late, he put all the dishes out on the front lawn because she went shopping instead of cleaning up from dinner the night before, normal stuff ya know. But those two loved each other. Whenever I think of how I want my relationship to be like, I think of them. They stood up for each other and to each other, they loved each other, not in spite of their flaws, but with their flaws.