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Author Topic: Your holiday hill to die on.  (Read 838843 times)

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crella

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #885 on: December 02, 2013, 05:43:25 PM »
Glitter, that was a wonderful story *wipes eyes, again*



Edited 'cause I leaned on my caps key.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2013, 05:45:02 PM by crella »

FauxFoodist

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #886 on: December 03, 2013, 04:48:43 AM »
All this talk about the Turkey, or not the Turkey, reminded me of a story my great-grandpa told me about the first Christmas he and my great-grandma had together once they were married.

So, great-grandma and great-grandpa both grew up very poor and didn't have two nickles to rub together when they got married. But great-grandma loved Christmas. And she wanted to make her husband the best Christmas dinner she could. Of course the woman barely knew how to cook (her mother always told her to marry the first man who would put up with her cooking, she married the first man who cooked for her instead) and again, no money. But she got herself down to the butcher one day and asked for the cheapest cut of meat they had, which just so happened to be a brisket. Not even half a pound, but great-grandma takes it and is going to make her husband the best Christmas dinner. Except, she really has no clue what to with brisket. She'd never cooked. Never eaten it even. But she had a Jewish neighbor who had mentioned it once, so she went and got the neighbor and asked how to cook the brisket. So the neighbor shows up and tells her it's going to shrink up and she doesn't have enough, great-grandma waves her off, she's make the best Christmas dinner ever, just show her how. She neighbor shows her how and sure enough, the brisket shrinks to about half it's size. Barley enough  for two people to eat (especially my huge great-grandpa). But she great-grandma pushes ahead. She makes her potatoes, her veggies, and even manages to whip a dessert (deep fried dough she called "Elf Ears", which I still love). Great-grandpa comes home and sees the food. A small serving of meat, limp veggies, and delsious potatoes (the woman knew her way around a potato), looks at his young wife who's forcing a quivering smile and says "My word! A meal for a king!" sat right down and ate every limp veggie, picked apart his brisket to make it last longer, and devoured his potatoes, proclaiming at the end that he was so stuffed he wouldn't eat for days!

Now, according to great-grandma, this was by far the worst meal she'd ever made. She even managed to light fire to one of her Elf Ears! Though she did learn how to make a darn fine brisket.

According to great-grandpa, until his dying day, it was far and away, the best dinner he'd ever eaten. And he likes his Elf Ears extra crispy thank you very much.

Every year for Christmas, they had brisket. Eventually bigger ones. Great-grandma taught my grandma (her DIL) to make brisket, she taught my mom, who taught me. We have it every year for Christmas. Other families might have ham, or duck, or turkey at Christmas, but we have brisket.

Your story touched my heart, too.

ladyknight1

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #887 on: December 03, 2013, 09:45:00 AM »
I think I will be making a Christmas brisket this year.  :) :'(
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

SamiHami

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #888 on: December 03, 2013, 09:46:59 AM »
Glitter-I love your story!

I don't think I've posted this one before, but if I have forgive me...

When I was a little girl we were stationed in Hawaii, far away from all family. It was just the 4 of us-Dad, Mom, Brother and me. Our family is all in upstate NY and PA and they never came to visit so our holidays were always just the four of us.

In addition, my mother was and is anorexic. She's pretty stable now, but back then she was really having a lot of problems with it to the point where dad had concerns that we might lose her (he didn't tell us kids that then, but has since told me about it as an adult).

So, this one Thanksgiving mom is really sick and in the hospital (again) and we are all worried. I was probably around 4th grade or so. Dad decided that his children weren't going to miss out on Thanksgiving because of this and decides that he is going to cook the entire meal himself. Which would have been wonderful if he knew how to cook. Or if the Internet had existed then to show him how to cook. Of if we had family closer that could help him out. But this was the 1970's and resources were limited, and back then a long distance call to his mother in NY would have cost way too much. So he just gets out a cookbook at goes at it.

Living on base is different than living in an regular neighborhood. There is a "we're all in this together" mentality. Word had somehow gotten around about mom's illness and dad's sweet but fumbling attempts at cooking...next thing you know the other mom's in the neighborhood show up, each bearing yummy food to share with us! These ladies made sure that we had a great meal and helped dad out so much. It's a really sweet memory for us-true community and neighborliness at its best.


What have you got? Is it food? Is it for me? I want it whatever it is!

gramma dishes

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #889 on: December 03, 2013, 10:27:07 AM »
I loved your story too, SamiHami.

It's another beautiful example of how sometimes the holidays bring out the BEST in people. 

Elfmama

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #890 on: December 03, 2013, 12:36:14 PM »
Living on base is different than living in an regular neighborhood. There is a "we're all in this together" mentality. Word had somehow gotten around about mom's illness and dad's sweet but fumbling attempts at cooking...next thing you know the other mom's in the neighborhood show up, each bearing yummy food to share with us! These ladies made sure that we had a great meal and helped dad out so much. It's a really sweet memory for us-true community and neighborliness at its best.
We military families have to stick together and take care of our own, because more often than not, there is no blood family available.  I can't count the number of stray airmen who joined us at our holiday celebrations over the years.  The potluck Christmas of 1979 stands out too.  DH's section had to work a full day shift Xmas Day, so we all celebrated together on their next break day.  Ever make Chicken Kiev for 25 people?   ;D
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

gingerzing

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #891 on: December 03, 2013, 01:27:37 PM »
GlitterIsMyDrug -
Of course it was a dinner fit for a king.  Your great-granddad was a prince of a husband to his very ernest young wife. 

It is stories like that which makes what we eat around the holiday table more special. 

**Perhaps a new thread of "What do you serve for holiday that is tradition?" is in order. ****Wanders off to start it. 

Snooks

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #892 on: December 03, 2013, 01:56:27 PM »
Living on base is different than living in an regular neighborhood. There is a "we're all in this together" mentality. Word had somehow gotten around about mom's illness and dad's sweet but fumbling attempts at cooking...next thing you know the other mom's in the neighborhood show up, each bearing yummy food to share with us! These ladies made sure that we had a great meal and helped dad out so much. It's a really sweet memory for us-true community and neighborliness at its best.
We military families have to stick together and take care of our own, because more often than not, there is no blood family available.  I can't count the number of stray airmen who joined us at our holiday celebrations over the years.  The potluck Christmas of 1979 stands out too.  DH's section had to work a full day shift Xmas Day, so we all celebrated together on their next break day.  Ever make Chicken Kiev for 25 people?   ;D

I'm picturing a single giant chicken kiev.

gramma dishes

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #893 on: December 03, 2013, 07:36:01 PM »
Ever make Chicken Kiev for 25 people?   ;D

I'm picturing a single giant chicken kiev.

Now that would be a chicken I'd be very, very afraid of if I confronted it walking out of the chicken house to greet me!!   :o

BrownEyedGirl

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #894 on: December 03, 2013, 07:46:21 PM »
My first post!  I feel like I should mark it in red ink on the calendar or something!

Not my hill, but my mother's.  Background: every year for the past five years, my mom and I have hosted her extended family for Christmas (I currently live at home).  Mom has nine living siblings, seven of whom live in the same town as us.  For as long as I can remember, the family has gotten together for a weekend to celebrate Christmas, usually a couple weeks before the actual holiday, or sometimes a couple weeks after, depending on schedules.  Hosting duties traditionally shifted from family to family each year, and the next year's host would be decided during the current year's festivities (ex. the host of 2010's celebration would be decided before everyone went home after 2009's celebration).  End background.

So, as I said, my mom has hosted for the last five years.  She's happy to do it; she loves having her family around, even those relatives who drive her nuts a lot of the time.  And she wants to keep the family celebration tradition going.  However, one thing that has bugged her is that each year, it seems like everyone just assumes that she will host the family, and no one else steps forward to offer to host.  Of course, there are valid reasons for some family members not hosting; several have houses that are too small, or too far away.  But others have plenty of room and either a) don't want to be bothered with it, or b) have ridiculous issues with other family members and refuse to grow up and get over it, so they don't host.  It's already December, and no one has made any mention of hosting. 

Well, this year, Mom decided that she wasn't going to worry about it.  There have already been relatives who have asked her 'when's the family Christmas going to be?' and Mom's answer has been, simply, 'I don't know.'  She's not going to offer to host, or even mention it at all.  She hates to see the tradition die, but she has decided that she's done.  Maybe a year of not having the big family Christmas at all will encourage other members of the family to step up.  We'll see what happens!
Whatever you do, give 100%.  Unless you're donating blood.

*inviteseller

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #895 on: December 03, 2013, 08:36:55 PM »
So, DS's dad and step family invite themselves for a holiday meal that they demand to be cooked for them, they are of questionable character, they want to bring other people unknown to the host, they eat, take leftovers then whine after the fact they weren't served what they wanted???  So THAT'S where my family went for Thanksgiving!  Your son could have served bologna sandwiches and grape kool aid and it would have been fine because they invited themselves, provided nothing, and took the left overs so they can't say word one about what was served.  If his dad had handed him $$$ and a grocery list of what to make  and helped with the prep, maybe, but in this case..host pays for the food, cleans, cooks, cleans again...host picks the menu. 

Elfmama

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #896 on: December 03, 2013, 09:07:51 PM »
Ever make Chicken Kiev for 25 people?   ;D

I'm picturing a single giant chicken kiev.

Now that would be a chicken I'd be very, very afraid of if I confronted it walking out of the chicken house to greet me!!   :o
And when you poke a fork in it, enough butter squirts out that the entire room and contents of same are covered with it...
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

gramma dishes

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #897 on: December 03, 2013, 09:16:48 PM »
Ever make Chicken Kiev for 25 people?   ;D

I'm picturing a single giant chicken kiev.

Now that would be a chicken I'd be very, very afraid of if I confronted it walking out of the chicken house to greet me!!   :o
And when you poke a fork in it, enough butter squirts out that the entire room and contents of same are covered with it...

Should be on the invitation:  Bring popcorn!  ;)

cicero

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #898 on: December 04, 2013, 05:13:42 AM »
Thanks, everyone!  I'm very proud of him, and I offer him up as a beacon of hope for folks who are having tough times with their teenagers.  Five years ago he had been expelled from the honors high school, spent a night in juvie for shoplifting, and had made a serious attempt on his life.  He's really turned himself around and is doing so well now, and has matured in every way more than I had ever hoped possible.

I did have to chuckle, though, when he called me Wednesday night ranting about his roommate who Won't Even Take Out the Trash!  And Leaves His Stuff All Over!  Doesn't he realize how hard DS has been working to clean the apartment?  Ah, sweet karma...
cute! i'm very proud of your son too (and if i wasn't an over-the-hill twice divorced women, i would be getting in line!)

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*inviteseller

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Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #899 on: December 04, 2013, 07:50:51 AM »
Thanks, everyone!  I'm very proud of him, and I offer him up as a beacon of hope for folks who are having tough times with their teenagers.  Five years ago he had been expelled from the honors high school, spent a night in juvie for shoplifting, and had made a serious attempt on his life.  He's really turned himself around and is doing so well now, and has matured in every way more than I had ever hoped possible.

I did have to chuckle, though, when he called me Wednesday night ranting about his roommate who Won't Even Take Out the Trash!  And Leaves His Stuff All Over!  Doesn't he realize how hard DS has been working to clean the apartment?  Ah, sweet karma...

My DD has an apartment with 2 friends and she complains that they are slobs..SLOBS!!  I just laugh because she always leaves a trail of detritus through my house.