Author Topic: Your holiday hill to die on.  (Read 262859 times)

1 Member and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Venus193

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 16059
  • Backstage passes are wonderful things!
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1350 on: February 27, 2014, 11:00:28 AM »
I have no idea what's happening because Eunice and Steve are in conflict over possibly moving to Canada.  I haven't heard from her in three weeks so I don't know what is happening with them.

It took several years' effort to get him to agree to have the party on the weekend because having it on the 17th on a weeknight wasn't working out after many of the guests moved out of the neighborhood.

poundcake

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1255
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1351 on: February 27, 2014, 11:07:38 AM »
What fantastic news, Glitter! Congrats to you and the wife! *throwing rice*

Lynn2000

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5552
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1352 on: February 27, 2014, 03:13:49 PM »
Thankfully, my former home town has taken a stand against one of it newer(awful) holiday traditions: http://www.centredaily.com/2014/02/25/4055913/most-downtown-state-college-taverns.html

Long story short, 7 years ago, St Patrick's Day fell over Penn State's Spring Break. Some students decided that, since they couldn't get stupid with their friends from college on the day itself, they'd make their own day, a "State Patty's Day" and get stupid then.

It got big, it got stupid, crazy amounts of non-locals/non-students were coming into town for it, a lot of stuff was getting broken and people were getting hospitalized/arrested, so the University decided last year to pay off the bars to not open.

Apparently it went well enough that they are doing it again this year. Hopefully they can put this stupid, even more made up than some holiday to bed for good.

My college town has a similar manufactured drinking holiday which is coming up soon. My boss has already been complaining about it. Honestly, I rarely if ever see any evidence of it, even though I live and work on campus. However, the newspapers are full of stories about it. Sometimes I think the authorities end up hyping it more than anyone else, you know?
~Lynn2000

Luci

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6095
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1353 on: February 27, 2014, 04:50:51 PM »
Thankfully, my former home town has taken a stand against one of it newer(awful) holiday traditions: http://www.centredaily.com/2014/02/25/4055913/most-downtown-state-college-taverns.html

Long story short, 7 years ago, St Patrick's Day fell over Penn State's Spring Break. Some students decided that, since they couldn't get stupid with their friends from college on the day itself, they'd make their own day, a "State Patty's Day" and get stupid then.

It got big, it got stupid, crazy amounts of non-locals/non-students were coming into town for it, a lot of stuff was getting broken and people were getting hospitalized/arrested, so the University decided last year to pay off the bars to not open.

Apparently it went well enough that they are doing it again this year. Hopefully they can put this stupid, even more made up than some holiday to bed for good.

My college town has a similar manufactured drinking holiday which is coming up soon. My boss has already been complaining about it. Honestly, I rarely if ever see any evidence of it, even though I live and work on campus. However, the newspapers are full of stories about it. Sometimes I think the authorities end up hyping it more than anyone else, you know?

I know a state university that "cancelled" Halloween for several years for that reason.

The Wild One, Forever

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1845
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1354 on: February 27, 2014, 06:30:45 PM »
I got to spend one Saint Paddy's day in New Orleans.  We had forgotten what weekend it was, and had out of town visitors who had never been to NOLA, so off we went.  I didn't drink, but I had lots of fun watching people have a good time.    8)  My son and I ate our favorite New Orleans food while our guests got their drink on.  Normally, I don't do anything to celebrate the day.
Soft silly music is meaningful, magical

rain

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 763
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1355 on: November 18, 2014, 10:49:09 PM »
'tis the season. ... keep those spines shiny

"oh we thank thee lord for the things we need, like the wind and the rain and the apple seed"

ladyknight1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8134
  • Operating the logic hammer since 1987.
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1356 on: November 19, 2014, 08:26:55 AM »
I've been polishing mine. Especially when asked if I remember that I was invited to another Thanksgiving celebration (I've already had one and have two more planned) this week.

No, I wasn't invited and it isn't convenient or possible to attend.

greencat

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2661
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1357 on: November 19, 2014, 02:47:03 PM »
I refuse to remain in the interior of any establishment that is playing Christmas music before Thanksgiving.

Venus193

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 16059
  • Backstage passes are wonderful things!
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1358 on: November 19, 2014, 03:09:24 PM »
I don't go anywhere near a mistletoe.

Chipmunky

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 65
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1359 on: November 19, 2014, 03:26:15 PM »
My mother's hill came many years ago....see, Dad had this very annoying habit of deciding we'd drive from our home in Smalltown A to visit his friend in BigCity B (there was a standing invite there) on say...the day before Thanksgiving, or Christmas Day. This was at least an 8-9 hour drive. Each way. Minimum. It happened at least once per year, beginning when I was 7 (try explaining to your excited 7 year old that she must put away her new gifts from Santa/family, pack her things, and sit quietly for hours in the car, before sitting quietly at Dad's friend's place for about 5 days before driving back. I resented every minute of it, but as a well behaved and disciplined child, I kept my mouth shut). My mother would not say a word, but would quietly fume at the waste of food at our house.

 It finally stopped when I was 16. That year, we'd been to BigCity B for turkey day. Dad's friend had a GF hosting dinner. Her two boys were with their father, so Friend invited another acquaintance, his girlfriend, and his parents to Thanksgiving. It's me with 8 adults all over the age of 35. But it gets better. See, acquaintance was born in Spain, and grew up in Argentina. His parents keep to their cultural tradition of not eating dinner until very, very late in the evening. Dinner was supposed to be served at 6. Because of the parents (and acquaintance, the GF, Dad's friend, Friend's GF's lack of spines), we did not sit down to eat until 10:30- they did not arrive until 10:15. The bird was bone dry. I was practically falling asleep in my mashed potatoes. Dad was annoyed, but would not say a word. Mom was pissed.

It gets better.

The Parents spend most of the meal sniping at each other. In Spanish. Very, very nasty comments. They thought their son would be the only one to understand them. I however had been taking Spanish classes for 5 years at that point, and understood them perfectly.

 So please, enjoy, if you will, the image of 16 yr old Chipmunky trying to keep it together, half asleep, half faint from hunger, as she realizes she's able to understand the nasty stuff going on across the table from her, and she must wrestle with saying something and risking parental wrath for being rude and interrupting conversations, or suffer in silence and try not to choke.

Well, I managed not to choke, but it was a close thing. I later told my folks what was really going on (the parents were sniping in polite tones so no one would guess they were arguing). Mom used that, combined with the ridiculously late dinner, to lay down the law re: going to BigCity B for holidays, on said holidays, after she's got things planned, for evermore. We've not been back since.

Shalamar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1279
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1360 on: November 19, 2014, 05:16:05 PM »
My hill to die on came a few years ago.  I've told this story before - when my daughter was a baby, my in-laws wanted us to drive to their house (which was 2.5 hours away from ours) on Christmas Eve, stay the night, and then open presents Christmas morning.  We said that we really couldn't stay the night with a very young baby, but we would be there Christmas morning.  MIL wasn't happy, but she said "Fine - just be here at 10:00 a.m..  That's when we're opening gifts." 

On Christmas morning we got up very early, ate breakfast, hurriedly opened our gifts to each other, packed up everything in our car and drove off in the dark.  We pulled up in front of the in-laws' house at 9:58 a.m. exactly, feeling triumphant.  We had done it!

We got in the front door and stared in dismay.  There were piles of unwrapped presents and wrapping paper everywhere.  They hadn't waited for us.  My husband, who's normally a very easy-going guy, pulled his mother aside and demanded to know why they'd gone ahead without us.  MIL said airily "Oh, the kids didn't want to wait."  The "kids" in question were my husband's younger sister and brother, who were both in their 20's at the time.   They didn't even care that we were tired, hurt, and disappointed.   

A few years after that, I put my foot down and said "We're spending Christmas Day at home.  We'll see your family in the New Year."  MIL did not like that one bit (she called one Christmas Day to chew my poor husband out, call him a bad son, and made him cry).  That only strengthened my resolve, however.

Venus193

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 16059
  • Backstage passes are wonderful things!
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1361 on: November 19, 2014, 05:53:09 PM »
I remember that story and good for you that you beat that.  "Kids," indeed.

wheeitsme

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4022
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1362 on: November 19, 2014, 06:50:02 PM »
My hill to die on came a few years ago.  I've told this story before - when my daughter was a baby, my in-laws wanted us to drive to their house (which was 2.5 hours away from ours) on Christmas Eve, stay the night, and then open presents Christmas morning.  We said that we really couldn't stay the night with a very young baby, but we would be there Christmas morning.  MIL wasn't happy, but she said "Fine - just be here at 10:00 a.m..  That's when we're opening gifts." 

On Christmas morning we got up very early, ate breakfast, hurriedly opened our gifts to each other, packed up everything in our car and drove off in the dark.  We pulled up in front of the in-laws' house at 9:58 a.m. exactly, feeling triumphant.  We had done it!

We got in the front door and stared in dismay.  There were piles of unwrapped presents and wrapping paper everywhere.  They hadn't waited for us.  My husband, who's normally a very easy-going guy, pulled his mother aside and demanded to know why they'd gone ahead without us.  MIL said airily "Oh, the kids didn't want to wait."  The "kids" in question were my husband's younger sister and brother, who were both in their 20's at the time.   They didn't even care that we were tired, hurt, and disappointed.   


And that is when I would leave.  Better a 2.5 hour trip home right away with the rest of the day for niceness than to spend it with people like that.

Lady Snowdon

  • Super cool awesome title
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6058
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1363 on: November 19, 2014, 07:55:45 PM »
This year I'm not playing the what time is Thanksgiving dinner game.  For the past few years, my DH's uncle and aunt have hosted Thanksgiving and Christmas at their house.  They're very organized and send out an email with the information a few weeks in advance.  I love this.  My MIL hates going over there for holidays, and inevitably decides that she wants to host her family's Thanksgiving dinner at the same time as the other party.  This has, in the past, ended up causing major conflicts as DH and I wrestle with "We RSVP'd there first" vs. "It's my parents, how do we tell them we won't be there".

This year, after MIL issued the invite to DH by phone and he told me about it, I said, "Well that's too bad, because I want to go to the *LastName* gathering."  Since Aunt and Uncle are having dinner kind of early, we're going to head over there and eat dinner (yum!) and then go over to my IL's for dessert/drinks.  We even get to get out of that early, as we'll need to pick our dog up by 8 pm from doggie daycare!  A much happier conclusion than trying to change our RSVP at this late date!

gramma dishes

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8265
Re: Your holiday hill to die on.
« Reply #1364 on: November 19, 2014, 08:13:28 PM »
...  A few years after that, I put my foot down and said "We're spending Christmas Day at home.  We'll see your family in the New Year."  MIL did not like that one bit (she called one Christmas Day to chew my poor husband out, call him a bad son, and made him cry).  That only strengthened my resolve, however.

A few years after that?  You went back? 

I'm afraid I'd have left right then and there the first time.  Obviously your presence wasn't really wanted; that your MIL could boss you around and make you jump through hoops was the important thing.

And for her Christmas Day call where she called your husband a "bad son"?  I wish he had hung up on her.  I certainly hope you reminded him that he wasn't a bad son.  She was a bad mother for putting him and his family in a position of lesser importance than other family members.  How hurtful!  :'(