Author Topic: tricking a guest  (Read 6354 times)

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platys

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #30 on: July 27, 2007, 11:20:45 AM »
I used to use chicken broth/stock in dishes, even though my ex-fiance insisted he detested chicken.  I never told him, and he usually REALLY liked those dishes.  (Usually it was rice/couscous)

I wouldn't normally do that, but he'd only eat like 3 things, and I was sick to death of trying to find workarounds for dishes.  He wasn't a vegetarian or allergic.  He was just picky.


Rinkatink88

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #31 on: July 27, 2007, 03:36:32 PM »
My BF doesn't like cinnamon either - not the taste or the smell.  Says everytime he burps, that taste comes back up - ewww.  It seems to run in the family, because his brother and dad don't like cinnamon either.  Pity  - cuz I like cinnammon.  No fun in baking apple pies without it.  At least he likes the Chinese 5-spice.  He knows there's a bit cinnamon in it, however, his dad won't use even that spice and he knows there are certain Chinese dishes that must have the 5-spice in order to make it authentic.



Oh, my goodness!  He isn't alone in the world???  And yes, this also runs in his family - his father and at least 2 of his brothers (I don't know about the 3rd) do not like cinnamon either!  I have often wondered if in fact this is an allergy or something since it is so prevelant in his family.  We had our kids tested for some food allergies, and they had to do a blood test.  When I was looking over the list of food items they could test for, one of them was cinnamon.  I wanted my kids tested, but because we had no valid reason to do so, the doctor wouldn't and my husband won't get tested either.

You know, you brought up an interesting point.  Not only they don't like cinnamon, but all three of them have the same bad allergies.  You should see how far they can run when I'm spraying on the hairspary.  They don't want to get tested either.  The mom, on the other hand, is very much like me, can eat almost anything and not seemed bother with the surroundings.


CarpeFelis

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #32 on: July 27, 2007, 09:25:58 PM »
This brownie pie had only 1/8 tsp of cinnamon in the entire pie?  That makes me think that they did it on purpose just to be be mean.  With an amount that small, the entire point was to make sure no one could taste it.  So what possible reason was there to put it in, other than to put one over and then get all smug?

I've never been able to stand people making fun of - or even just questioning - someone else's food preferences.  What I do or do not put on my plate or in my mouth is nobody's darn business but mine.  And just because you love some particular food doesn't mean I have to like it, and vice versa.

Has anyone else skipped some particular food item and then had the host or hostess question why they weren't eating it and then insist on making them something else?  It happened to me at ex-MIL & -FIL's once, and it was absolutely mortifying.

jordan

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #33 on: July 28, 2007, 12:06:15 AM »
I've never been able to stand people making fun of - or even just questioning - someone else's food preferences.  What I do or do not put on my plate or in my mouth is nobody's darn business but mine.  And just because you love some particular food doesn't mean I have to like it, and vice versa.

I totally agree.

weber06

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #34 on: July 29, 2007, 11:09:48 PM »
My BIL and FIL hate sage.  To them it tastes like soap.  We'd never try to grind it up and put it in a dish.  There are so many other wonderful things to make, why torture them with something they don't like?  And I respect the fact that they told DH and I they don't like sage.  The direct approach is nice.

Lisbeth

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #35 on: July 30, 2007, 06:17:48 PM »
Tricking your husband was rude.

Allergies or no, it is rude to put a food that contains an ingredient disliked by someone in front of that person, watch them eat it, and then make fun of that person afterwards.

It's nobody's job to control what another mentally and physically healthy adult eats.
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BabyMama

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2007, 09:19:13 AM »
I admit, I've tricked my husband before. He's convinced he hates everything about coconut--taste, smell, texture, etc. Now, I can understand the texture...I know a lot of people who don't care for coconut because all they've had is the dried stuff in the baking isle. But the taste and smell? I love the smell and the taste. But he swore he hated it.

Until I shared with him that the curry he loved so much had coconut milk in it. Ooooh. Scary. No taste complaints after that!  ::)

jordan

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #37 on: August 01, 2007, 09:48:24 AM »
I admit, I've tricked my husband before. He's convinced he hates everything about coconut--taste, smell, texture, etc. Now, I can understand the texture...I know a lot of people who don't care for coconut because all they've had is the dried stuff in the baking isle. But the taste and smell? I love the smell and the taste. But he swore he hated it.

Until I shared with him that the curry he loved so much had coconut milk in it. Ooooh. Scary. No taste complaints after that!  ::)

I'm glad you won over your husband to curry, but there are indeed people who dislike the smell and taste of coconut.

It is helpful to point out that some items, as an ingredient, or prepared differently, have a different taste.

The oddest one for me is sweet potatoes. I hate them mashed or baked whole. But slice them thin and bake them into chip? MMMMM.

But no one had to trick me...

BabyMama

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #38 on: August 02, 2007, 09:47:17 AM »
Probably mean of me, but I've basically disregarded any complaints my husband makes (occasional though they are) because I've discovered that many of his complaints stem from whatever he says he doesn't like being prepared poorly in the first place. Coconut hate comes from the dried, shredded kind. He said he hated chicken pot pie (probably because frozen was the only kind he'd ever had) and now it's one of his favorite meals because it's homemade. Hated stuffing and gravy because all he'd ever had was the add-water kinds but loves homemade. Not a fish fan but now salmon is one of his favorites. Etc.

He gets it from his dad, though, who is Mr. Picky. The in-laws live off the same 6 meals because they won't try anything new. If we go to a nice, expensive restaurant, FIL always finds the only sandwich, or the blandest thing, or the plainest thing they have. Not an issue of price. Just an issue of "CRUD MONKEYS! that might be WEIRD!!") I wrote about them recently in another thread--they're the ones who microwave meat for like 15 minutes to cook it.

I dislike going to their house for holidays because my family makes a big deal about food and always makes holiday specific, special food (huge production during Thanksgiving, people are up super early in the morning, making homemade rolls, stuffing, gorgeous turkey, etc; we do Korean food on Christmas Eve--last year I think we ate for 4 hours!), but his family always has the same stuff for every holiday (usually ham or turkey cooked in a crock pot, freeze-dried potato au gratin, frozen veggies, gravy from a just-add-water packet, and Wonder Bread rolls.) Loses the fun special-ness of holidays when it's the same generic food in comparison.

Nannerdoman

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #39 on: August 03, 2007, 01:23:54 PM »
Bless me, EHellions, for I have sinned.

For many, many years my DM insisted she couldn't eat pepper.  Not an allergy, just that her stomach was too sensitive and she could NOT tolerate pepper.  Well, when I got out on my own and started making my own spaghetti sauce, I started throwing in all kinds of herbs and spices to get the best sauce ever.  One of them was--pepper.  Not much, just a few shakes from the pepper shaker, and you couldn't taste it.  But the sauce with pepper had a little more zip, a bit livelier flavor, and Mom loved it and never suffered ill effects.  Never knew the pepper was there, either; I just never told her.

I never tried pepper myself until last year, after DM died, and now I find I really like a sprinkle of it on bland foods like scrambled eggs or mac 'n' cheese.
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VorFemme

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #40 on: August 03, 2007, 01:53:34 PM »
My mother was in medical research (well, they were working on sheep & goats but they got updates on EVERYTHING - including people related items).  Dad worked with the adult mentally retarded at a nearby state school for a couple of decades.

One of the studies that she passed along to us was done on allergies of the mentally retarded.  It seemed that if a person of normal intelligence announced that they didn't LIKE something (I think the study specifically mentioned orange juice) then no one made them drink it, at least not after they were old enough to find other ways to get vitamin c. 

But the mentally retarded would be made to drink their orange juice because "it was good for them".........

Studies on family members showed that many times, what was disliked was actually something that they were allergic (or at least sensitive) to - but not having the vocabulary to say "it makes my throat itchy" or not thinking about the extra detail being significant, the phrase "I don't like it" wasn't "significant" to care takers.

Even if the caretakers were having to deal with digestive upsets, itchy rashes of unknown origin, and so forth..........

After the study, the suggestion was made to ask if OTHER family members were allergic or sensitive to the disliked item AND to watch for possible reactions to the item, if it was consumed.

I understand that there were some diet changes that got added to medical records...........just because you don't stop breathing doesn't mean that you aren't allergic to a food.  It just means that the reaction may not be as dramatically visible as turning blue because you've stopped breathing or breaking out in hives..........

Itchy throat, running nose, watering eyes, or what we shall euphemistically refer to as "digestive upsets" can be "an allergic reaction", too!
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emmeileia

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #41 on: August 03, 2007, 02:17:20 PM »
I have a similar story but a bit reversed.

Last summer, I worked at a boy's camp in Algonquin Park with my boyfriend. I ran ecology, he was head chef. It was a very isolated camp...on an island 10 minutes down an dirt road from the highway. You had to take a canoe or barget from there to get to the camp. Due to the remoteness, phones were often down and cellphone reception is sketchy. (But the camp does not allow them anyways...). On the main highway of the park, if you are injured, a medivac will take AT LEAST an hour. Even if they use the rescue copter. On the island it is longer, and there was nowhere for the helicopter to land. Plus, this was a tripping camp, so campers spent the majority of their time in the park camping, generally several hours from an access point where they could get to a phone.
For this reason, we DID NOT accept kids with nut allergies, especially peanuts. We also reccomended that kids with severe allergies try a different camp.
Well, the counsellors were picking up the kids to come up for the summer, these parents dropped their 7 year old off, said "btw, he is DEATHLY ALLERGIC TO PEANUTS, here is his Epe-pen" and bolted. Turns out they had lied on their application to the camp. The Director would not send him home. (god knows why...) So BF had to overhaul the entire dining hall. This kid got his own dishes (sterilized every day) a special 'nut free table' (since every other table always has PB & J on it). BF had to completely overhaul his menu for that month, cause peanuts did feature in the menu. The trip counsellors also had to overhaul their menus, because a lot of the trip food had peanuts, or possible contact with peanuts.

I just had to wonder...who risks their kid like that??? If he had had a reaction, he would most likely have died!

NOVA Lady

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #42 on: August 03, 2007, 05:11:46 PM »
I have a similar story but a bit reversed.

Last summer, I worked at a boy's camp in Algonquin Park with my boyfriend. I ran ecology, he was head chef. It was a very isolated camp...on an island 10 minutes down an dirt road from the highway. You had to take a canoe or barget from there to get to the camp. Due to the remoteness, phones were often down and cellphone reception is sketchy. (But the camp does not allow them anyways...). On the main highway of the park, if you are injured, a medivac will take AT LEAST an hour. Even if they use the rescue copter. On the island it is longer, and there was nowhere for the helicopter to land. Plus, this was a tripping camp, so campers spent the majority of their time in the park camping, generally several hours from an access point where they could get to a phone.
For this reason, we DID NOT accept kids with nut allergies, especially peanuts. We also reccomended that kids with severe allergies try a different camp.
Well, the counsellors were picking up the kids to come up for the summer, these parents dropped their 7 year old off, said "btw, he is DEATHLY ALLERGIC TO PEANUTS, here is his Epe-pen" and bolted. Turns out they had lied on their application to the camp. The Director would not send him home. (god knows why...) So BF had to overhaul the entire dining hall. This kid got his own dishes (sterilized every day) a special 'nut free table' (since every other table always has PB & J on it). BF had to completely overhaul his menu for that month, cause peanuts did feature in the menu. The trip counsellors also had to overhaul their menus, because a lot of the trip food had peanuts, or possible contact with peanuts.

I just had to wonder...who risks their kid like that??? If he had had a reaction, he would most likely have died!

I feel so sad for that child that he has those morons as parents. That they lied on the application shows they knew exactly what they were doing. Grrrrr.

kherbert05

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #43 on: August 05, 2007, 09:59:20 PM »
I have a similar story but a bit reversed.

Last summer, I worked at a boy's camp in Algonquin Park with my boyfriend. I ran ecology, he was head chef. It was a very isolated camp...on an island 10 minutes down an dirt road from the highway. You had to take a canoe or barget from there to get to the camp. Due to the remoteness, phones were often down and cellphone reception is sketchy. (But the camp does not allow them anyways...). On the main highway of the park, if you are injured, a medivac will take AT LEAST an hour. Even if they use the rescue copter. On the island it is longer, and there was nowhere for the helicopter to land. Plus, this was a tripping camp, so campers spent the majority of their time in the park camping, generally several hours from an access point where they could get to a phone.
For this reason, we DID NOT accept kids with nut allergies, especially peanuts. We also reccomended that kids with severe allergies try a different camp.
Well, the counsellors were picking up the kids to come up for the summer, these parents dropped their 7 year old off, said "btw, he is DEATHLY ALLERGIC TO PEANUTS, here is his Epe-pen" and bolted. Turns out they had lied on their application to the camp. The Director would not send him home. (god knows why...) So BF had to overhaul the entire dining hall. This kid got his own dishes (sterilized every day) a special 'nut free table' (since every other table always has PB & J on it). BF had to completely overhaul his menu for that month, cause peanuts did feature in the menu. The trip counsellors also had to overhaul their menus, because a lot of the trip food had peanuts, or possible contact with peanuts.

I just had to wonder...who risks their kid like that??? If he had had a reaction, he would most likely have died!

I think the director should have called CPS, that is abuse. They endangered their child. When I went to camp, my parent's 1st question was if they could accomendate my Peanut Allergy. If they had said no - I wouldn't have gone.
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spats

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Re: tricking a guest
« Reply #44 on: August 06, 2007, 11:54:31 AM »
It's always rude.

I've got food allergies, and people have tricked me into eating things that I'm allergic to, in the hopes that they can giggle later and point out that "it didn't make you sick, did it?" One such event almost sent me to the hospital with hives. Needless to say, those friends aren't anymore.

The same thing has happened with my father. He's allergic to capsaicin (what makes peppers hot). I think the correct term for this might actually be "sensitive," but people are a little more familiar with "allergic."
He loves bell peppers and can consume huge mounded piles of wasabi (I think he overcompensates here, b/c it makes him feel better that he can't engage in silly macho things like habenaro eating and whatnot). When he went on a cruise for his honeymoon, they spent a few extra days in the departure city...New Orleans. He only had to go to the hospital once on that trip, but he says he nearly starved.
If he takes a benedryl before, he can eat some mildly spicy dishes without his throat completely closing (although he'll be some breathing problems and irritation all night...but he feels better about "eating normally" with friends). One friend for years was convinced he was just being "wussy" about spicy foods and tried to sneak it in meals. This did not go over well. It's not a wise idea to deny large, violent men breathing rights.

On a related note, he has an irrational and extreme fear of needles so an epi pen isn't an option. In his younger years, he threw his share of nurses across the room in an adrenaline-fueled panic when they tried to surprise him. If the situation allows, he usually needs 10-15 minutes of "zen" time for each attempt (he stresses out so much, his blood vessels hide away and can be difficult to find)...and a few minutes to tear up/cry before he zens again.