News: All new forum theme!  See Forum Announcements for more information. 

  • July 31, 2015, 12:09:00 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Inexpensive housing in NY (NY Housing Connect, Non prof-run residences etc)  (Read 683 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

cicero

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 18826
So i am getting ready to move to NY and trying to avoid living in my sister's or brother's basement until i can afford a decent rent. I am looking into living options - assuming that i will work in manhattan (mid-town east), and knowing that i can't afford to live *in* the city, i am checking out options in Long Island, queens, NJ, etc., obviously taking into account the costs of transportation and wear and tear on me...

In my searches, i came across two interesting options and was wondering if anyone had heard of them, used them, or know someone who uses them:
1. "boarding houses" in NYC , run mostly by religious orders (but open to all). they are mostly located in mid town (east or west) and not too expensive.
The pros would be location, no need for transportation costs (or max would be the local subway), and price.
The cons - most feature shared bathrooms and you just get the one room (they have common areas). Most dont' allow fridges or *any* kind of cooking in the room, including a coffee maker.
2.  New York Housing Connect - which appears to be some kind of rent-controlled/sliding scale *in* the city. you need to register, apply and then wait till your number comes up.

Does anyone have any information on these? or other ideas? (I am pretty well set as to where i would move to in queens/brooklyn or nj if i decide to do that. but the prices offered in these two options were mucho lower).

            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools


TootsNYC

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 33225
I lived in the Brandon Residence Hall on 85th Street when I first moved to NYC (stayed with a friend, my "New York mom," for a month or two until I got in). Decades ago.

It was fine--I enjoyed it a lot. The food was not particularly good (and shortly after I moved out, our kitchen was closed by the board of health); breakfast was fine. It was helpful to have that rolled into my rent.

I made friends there, which was a really nice way to get established in a totally new city. I kept some of those friends a long, long time. Two of those friends became my first two roommates when I moved out.

There was a big TV room, and we socialized there, but my little room was cozy as well. I ended up adding a medium-size recliner I found on the street as well as a small drop-leaf table given to me by a colleague who was decluttering. It was pretty stuffed w/ furniture, but I could sit and watch TV, etc.

I lived there about 4 years, I think.

cicero

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 18826
http://nymag.com/thecut/2015/03/why-i-live-in-an-all-women-boardinghouse.html
thanks - this is one of the articles a friend sent me when i started joking about moving to a boarding house :D

            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools

cicero

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 18826
I lived in the Brandon Residence Hall on 85th Street when I first moved to NYC (stayed with a friend, my "New York mom," for a month or two until I got in). Decades ago.

It was fine--I enjoyed it a lot. The food was not particularly good (and shortly after I moved out, our kitchen was closed by the board of health); breakfast was fine. It was helpful to have that rolled into my rent.

I made friends there, which was a really nice way to get established in a totally new city. I kept some of those friends a long, long time. Two of those friends became my first two roommates when I moved out.

There was a big TV room, and we socialized there, but my little room was cozy as well. I ended up adding a medium-size recliner I found on the street as well as a small drop-leaf table given to me by a colleague who was decluttering. It was pretty stuffed w/ furniture, but I could sit and watch TV, etc.

I lived there about 4 years, I think.

Thanks Toots - good to hear some first-hand experiences.  I'm assuming that you were a lot younger when you lived there than i am (i'm 54).

            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools

TootsNYC

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 33225
Yes, I was much younger--I'm 54 as well.
but when I was there, the Brandon had a mix of ages, and we all got along quite well. There were people who were 54 or so among us. Really, every decade was well represented. And some people had been there for several years, and others for only a few months--wide spectrum, in almost all ways.

I don't know what it's like now, of course, but I wouldn't imagine it's that different.

LadyL

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3106
2.  New York Housing Connect - which appears to be some kind of rent-controlled/sliding scale *in* the city. you need to register, apply and then wait till your number comes up.

Does anyone have any information on these? or other ideas? (I am pretty well set as to where i would move to in queens/brooklyn or nj if i decide to do that. but the prices offered in these two options were mucho lower).

Re: option #2, here is some info you might find useful: http://www.brickunderground.com/blog/2014/08/8020_affordable_housing_guide

There is another option you didn't mention - live in a boarding house/air bnb/long term stay hotel while apartment hunting aggressively. If you're really aggressive, due to the sheer number of rentals that exist you can usually find things priced under market, it just takes a ton of on-the-ground legwork. For example, I know people who've taken over the lease on rent controlled units when the original leaseholder had to move suddenly, and they are incredible deals BUT they also had to be in the right place at the right time. There are also the old-school landlords who just hang a "for rent" sign and rely on word of mouth to rent apartments - often those are priced less competitively. But you have to be there to find those places.


cicero

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 18826
2.  New York Housing Connect - which appears to be some kind of rent-controlled/sliding scale *in* the city. you need to register, apply and then wait till your number comes up.

Does anyone have any information on these? or other ideas? (I am pretty well set as to where i would move to in queens/brooklyn or nj if i decide to do that. but the prices offered in these two options were mucho lower).

Re: option #2, here is some info you might find useful: http://www.brickunderground.com/blog/2014/08/8020_affordable_housing_guide

There is another option you didn't mention - live in a boarding house/air bnb/long term stay hotel while apartment hunting aggressively. If you're really aggressive, due to the sheer number of rentals that exist you can usually find things priced under market, it just takes a ton of on-the-ground legwork. For example, I know people who've taken over the lease on rent controlled units when the original leaseholder had to move suddenly, and they are incredible deals BUT they also had to be in the right place at the right time. There are also the old-school landlords who just hang a "for rent" sign and rely on word of mouth to rent apartments - often those are priced less competitively. But you have to be there to find those places.
thanks for the tips LadyL. that link is *very* useful - it gives the whole process, "what to expect when..."

I also like the idea of boarding house/hotel while searching.

Sounds like a plan.

            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools