Author Topic: Fancy names for non-fancy food  (Read 4935 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Kimblee

  • I look good in white....
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6615
  • "Hugs don't go Boom." "They don't? Since when?"
    • My Blog
Fancy names for non-fancy food
« on: November 18, 2011, 08:35:50 PM »
In particular, i would like a fancy name for the dish "Pigs In a Blanket" (Aka sausages wrapped in dough, sometimes with cheese tucked in with it.)

A friend of mine is going to culinary school (yay! :D) and keeps telling me about all these fancy things she's been cooking, then asks what i have cooked. I'm tired of saying things like "Chili Pie", "Hamburger Helper" and of course, "Pigs In a Blanket"

So i want fancy names for non-fancy food. :P Anyone have an idea?

rose red

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7243
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #1 on: November 18, 2011, 08:39:59 PM »
Sausage pastries? 

Outdoor Girl

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12874
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #2 on: November 18, 2011, 08:45:25 PM »
We always called PIAB sausage rolls.

From Quebec, a specific kind of meat pie was called tortiere.  So maybe your chilli pie could be tomato tortiere?

Salsbury steak is a fancy name for what is essentially a hamburger patty served in mushroom gravy so your hamburger helper could be (something) steak.

I would say, for the most part, translate the name of the dish into French or Italian or Spanish and it will sound fancier.   :D
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

Kimblee

  • I look good in white....
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6615
  • "Hugs don't go Boom." "They don't? Since when?"
    • My Blog
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2011, 08:48:06 PM »
Sausage pastries?

Hmm... It does sound better than pigs in a blanket. lol

My brother just came in and says I should use "Pasteles salchicha con queso" I can't even pronounce it.

I know its spanish, but only because that's the homework he's doing.  ;)

Kimblee

  • I look good in white....
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6615
  • "Hugs don't go Boom." "They don't? Since when?"
    • My Blog
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2011, 08:48:47 PM »
We always called PIAB sausage rolls.

From Quebec, a specific kind of meat pie was called tortiere.  So maybe your chilli pie could be tomato tortiere?

Salsbury steak is a fancy name for what is essentially a hamburger patty served in mushroom gravy so your hamburger helper could be (something) steak.

I would say, for the most part, translate the name of the dish into French or Italian or Spanish and it will sound fancier.   :D

Tarte au Chili?

Outdoor Girl

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12874
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2011, 08:51:39 PM »
Tarte, in my mind, indicates sweet rather than savoury. But yeah, something like that.   :)
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

Mikayla

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3957
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2011, 08:53:38 PM »
How about "saucisson en croute"?  That's French for sausage in pastry :)

Hamburger Helper could be "ground kobe casserole with savory herbs". 

I've been watching too much Iron Chef.

Kimblee

  • I look good in white....
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6615
  • "Hugs don't go Boom." "They don't? Since when?"
    • My Blog
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2011, 09:02:28 PM »
How about "saucisson en croute"?  That's French for sausage in pastry :)

Hamburger Helper could be "ground kobe casserole with savory herbs". 

I've been watching too much Iron Chef.

Heehee. I love it.

I just old her I made "saucisson en croute" for dinner.

She replied with "Pigs in Blankets again? When's dinner, I'll bring the wine."

When I pointed out that she's three states away she told me to mail her some.  ::) lol

Paper Roses

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4771
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2011, 09:04:59 PM »
Hamburger Helper - Ground sirloin of beef mixed with reconstitued gently seasoned base served mixed with al dente pasta.  One of word-renowned chef Elizabeth Crocker's famous recipes!

Pigs in a blanket - Lightly seasoned miniature tube steaks wrapped in flaky puff pastry, oven-roasted to perfection.
No, you can't, because you wishpishabonnyfish.

amandaelizabeth

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 733
    • Amanda's home based ece
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2011, 09:46:14 PM »
I remember reading as a teenager a short story by Frances Parkinson Keyes (and yes I realize how that must date me) where an American Ambassadress in Paris wows the French at a dinner party by creatively naming traditional southern food in a French manner.  To a non American things like grits an hush puppies sounded far more exotic than anything she came up with

Layla Miller

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2675
  • I know stuff.
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2011, 10:13:14 AM »
Sausages inna bun?   :D
I searched for nothing on the Internet and got 175,000,000 hits.

glacio

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 181
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #11 on: November 19, 2011, 11:33:02 AM »
Kolaches. Of course, Polish is not known for being one of the fancier world languages, so that might not help your case.

nutraxfornerves

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1842
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2011, 12:09:48 PM »
Let me suggest Google Translate.  Enter the name of the dish, pick a language & see how it looks. You can even click on a little speaker symbol to hear how it sounds, so you can practice.

Think she'd recognize "in porcos saga" or "battaniye domuzlardan"? How about "torta di peperoncino"?  "Hamburguesa de ayuda"?

Bonus dish: Thunfisch Nudelauflauf


Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

nutraxfornerves

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1842
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2011, 12:34:27 PM »
I just thought of something. I speak a bit of Turkish. In Turkish pasta is not spaghetti and noodles (that's makarna); it means pie or cake.

So, that chili pie is a pasta. I fooled around with different ways to say it, and decided that "bean pie with peppers" would be the easiest for you to say.

biberli fasulye pasta

Bee-behr-lih fah-sool-yeh pahs-tah

The fun thing about this is that your friend has probably heard of the Italian soup, pasta e fagioli, which is often called "pasta fazool*" in the US. So she just might think you cooked a vat of homemade soup.

* "When the stars make you drool, joos-ta like pasta fazool, that's amore".

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

Ms_Cellany

  • The Queen of Squee
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5340
  • Big white goggie? No. Hasn't seen him.
Re: Fancy names for non-fancy food
« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2011, 04:08:06 PM »

Bonus dish: Thunfisch Nudelauflauf


Tunafish noodle fluff?
Current foster kittens: Friday (F: green collar), Duffy (M: blue), Fez (M: orange), Kipling (M: pink), Thirteen (F: yellow).