Author Topic: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions  (Read 19285 times)

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blue2000

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #60 on: November 28, 2011, 08:56:09 AM »

*My mom's personal "favorite" was vegetable Jell-O, a vegetable brother flavored jello that my grand added carrots, olives and other veggies to before molding.  :o

I don't like jello, but I think I would have enjoyed that as a child. ;D
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wx4caster

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #61 on: November 28, 2011, 09:08:38 AM »
In my family's culture, it is traditional to eat fish on Christmas Eve -- specifically carp. The problem was that no one in my family has ever been that keen on fish, and particularly not carp. (And where I grew up, in Canada, I don't think it is even possible to buy -- carp except maybe koi for your pond.) So one year we decided to have some fish that we all do like: smoked salmon. Served with fresh bagels and cream cheese. So now the Christmas Eve tradition is bagels, lox and cream cheese.

DH grew up in a fishing village.  His family's tradition (and now ours) is lobster on Christmas Eve.
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wendelenn

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #62 on: November 28, 2011, 09:30:12 AM »
^ I actually like those...

Seconded. . .
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Kariachi

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #63 on: November 28, 2011, 10:17:52 AM »
My Solstice Scone. I make it every Christmas for breakfast, going so far as to be the first one up so that it'll be ready before we're done with gifts.

It's the singular that hints to the bizarre, my ex refused to even call it a scone.

One pound white cheddar cheese and one pound applewood smoked bacon, mixed with enough dough for a recipe calling for four strips of bacon and 1/4 cup cheddar cheese, plop into round cake pan, bake while it fries in it's own grease, slice, serves four to six.

Not warthog sweat bizarre, but certainly something different.
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Cami

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #64 on: November 28, 2011, 10:22:27 AM »
Interesting assumption. I think a lot of people actually prefer the taste or texture of the canned jelly.

I didn't say anything about the taste or texture, it's the presentation I find unusual.

ETA: When looking for a picture as an example, I learned that presentation of the canned sauce is apparently the source of lots of (hilarious) debate:
http://www.fark.com/comments/6758556/Canned-Cranberry-sauce-It-looks-like-a-log-of-happiness.

I guess it's actually a "thing." Who knew!
I saw a program on Thanksgiving foods and they interviewed a spokeswoman from Ocean Spray. She explained that at one point, they removed the ridges from the cans (because they are unnecessary) and there was massive complaints from customers. So the ridges came back.

camlan

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #65 on: November 28, 2011, 10:22:39 AM »
My Solstice Scone. I make it every Christmas for breakfast, going so far as to be the first one up so that it'll be ready before we're done with gifts.

It's the singular that hints to the bizarre, my ex refused to even call it a scone.

One pound white cheddar cheese and one pound applewood smoked bacon, mixed with enough dough for a recipe calling for four strips of bacon and 1/4 cup cheddar cheese, plop into round cake pan, bake while it fries in it's own grease, slice, serves four to six.

Not warthog sweat bizarre, but certainly something different.

Um, that would be shredded cheddar cheese? And do you cook the bacon first? Because this would send my family into raptures on Christmas morning.
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Luci

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #66 on: November 28, 2011, 10:28:17 AM »
My Solstice Scone. I make it every Christmas for breakfast, going so far as to be the first one up so that it'll be ready before we're done with gifts.

It's the singular that hints to the bizarre, my ex refused to even call it a scone.

One pound white cheddar cheese and one pound applewood smoked bacon, mixed with enough dough for a recipe calling for four strips of bacon and 1/4 cup cheddar cheese, plop into round cake pan, bake while it fries in it's own grease, slice, serves four to six.

Not warthog sweat bizarre, but certainly something different.

Wait! This sounds perfect! I get to serve breakfast for 7 - 12 on the 26th. I'm online searching for recipes. There seem to be lots of good ones.

Thanks for punching my creative must-have-different-food streak.

Thipu1

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #67 on: November 28, 2011, 10:33:26 AM »
^ I actually like those...

Seconded. . .

I second these too.  the most exotic flavor is grapefruit.  Absolutely delicious.

Ambrosia Hino

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #68 on: November 28, 2011, 10:44:18 AM »
SMIL makes homemade flan for just about every holiday get-together. Not complaining though, because I love flan (hmmm, maybe knowing how much I like it is why she makes it? Hadn't thought of that...)

Maybe its not that weird, but holidays since FIL got married to her were the first time I've gotten real homemade flan, much less on a semi-regular basis ;D Flan and spanish rice just look a bit odd on the Thanksgiving table

bopper

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #69 on: November 28, 2011, 10:47:20 AM »
The post in the "hill to die on" thread about the SIL serving frozen food for Thanksgiving inspired this thread.

What bizarre food tradition have you encountered that still has you perplexed? For me, it's my in-laws preference for how they serve the canned cranberry sauce- they extricate it from the can in one piece so the can imprint is intact, and they serve it like that - a perfect cylinder with a can imprint, sitting on a china serving dish. Everyone slices off pieces of it like it's a loaf of bread.

I asked LordL, "why do they almost seem to celebrate how artificial it is?" Our conclusion is that it's a holdover from the era when "home made" meant "too poor to afford store bought" and "store bought = fancy."

Every time we eat somewhere and there is canned cranberry sauce, and you can see even just a little bit of the can imprint on part of it, we look at each other and say "Fancy!"

This made me laugh, but yum! Cylindrical cranberry sauce!   That is how I serve it too...except we slice it all up and perhaps gently fan it down on the plate.

lady_disdain

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #70 on: November 28, 2011, 10:49:15 AM »
I think using condensed soup as a base for a casserole or sauce is strange. The texture is off, the taste is too concentrated and it is much too salty - it is meant to be diluted, after all. I guess that it comes from living in a country where there is a lot less processed food available and a lot more cooking from fresh ingredients. I can understand why some people would feel it is "bizarre". Just as I understand that some people would feel that some of our habits are bizarre (fried manioc flour with egg anyone?)

RobinJ

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #71 on: November 28, 2011, 10:53:25 AM »
My mother takes cherry tomatoes and stuffs them with crabmeat.  I believe that she may mix mayo in with the crabmeat?  Not sure.  I don't do raw tomatoes so I have never tried these.  But they are a Must Have at Thanksgiving, Christmas, Easter, birthdays, etc....

O'Dell

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #72 on: November 28, 2011, 10:58:01 AM »
I gusee for me the definition of "bizarre" is different.  Casseroles with cream soup/white sauce/tomato base - matters of taste.  One or the other does not make it "bizarre".  Now if you told me the base was the sweat of a young warthog - bizarre.  Cranberry jelly in log, slices or sqished up - style choices.  I don't quite see the "bizarre" in it.  Maybe if you made people eat it by sipping it through a straw?

Force feeding somebody a prune comes the closest IMO, mostly because I imagine an internal monolouge "You will be regular in the coming year."

See in this context I'm reading it as "unusual" or "what tradition you do not get". I personally am amused by the cranberry sauce in a can. In a way it is rather beautiful...the glistening rich color...but really people are looking at the decorative qualities of the inside of a tin can. That to me is pretty bizarre once you break it down. Nothing wrong with that...but yes bizarre. And when I lived in California with many latino friends, they'd ask me what my midwest family ate and they thought some of my traditional family meals were bizarre and borderline repulsive (not that they said that but it's the impression I got). When I first heard about my friend's family that did the whole Tamale Xmas Eve thing, I thought it was sorta' bizarre....I would have paid good money to attend and learn how to make tamales and be a part of it. It sounded like a lot of fun and absolutely fascinating. Even other family's in the area thought it was strange that they had stuck with such an old-fashioned tradition.

And the prune thing cracks me up, but then I'm fascinated in all the superstitions that people have. I don't believe in them, but I'll partake of just about any if it suits me. There are even some superstitions I go along with for continuity of family traditions sake. Can't think of any to do with food though. And for sure a prune would be good luck! How else are you gonna' poo with all the rich foods that people eat at the holidays? :P
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Dorrie78

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #73 on: November 28, 2011, 11:00:55 AM »
My mom found a turkey-shaped cookie cutter years ago and now takes slices of the gelled, canned cranberry sauce and cuts them into turkeys. Each dinner guest gets a cranberry turkey on a small plate. One year, as a joke, she told her son-in-law (my sis' husband) that his Thanksgiving task was to cut disks of carrots into the shape of turkey feet. Two for each cranberry turkey. Despite the laughter and being told she wasn't serious, he carefully cut two tiny turkey feet for each cranberry turkey out of the carrot slices. New family tradition born.

LadyL

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #74 on: November 28, 2011, 11:03:12 AM »
For me personally, I find it to be an odd juxtaposition that people often spend hours slaving over a home cooked turkey, and then serve sides that are made with canned, processed foods. As a PP mentioned it does seem to be a holdover from the 1950s marketing targeted towards house wives. People became used to those tastes and are now nostalgic about them, and pass that nostalgia down. I guess since as I've gotten older, my palate for very salty and processed foods has gone way down, I don't fully relate to that view. For one, I blow up like a blimp from water retention if I have too much salt and carbs at the same time.  I do love certain processed foods in certain contexts - White Castle anyone? - but a meal with sides primarily consisting of them? No thanks :).