Author Topic: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions  (Read 19261 times)

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RubyCat

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #75 on: November 28, 2011, 11:27:49 AM »
My mother actually loved canned veggies.  She was a really picky eater and I think I only saw her eat canned peas, canned green beans, canned corn, fresh cooked spinach, carrots, and maybe squash.  And she boiled them all to near mush.  I used to love the canned cranberry sauce and thought it was extra special if I was able to get the end piece with the imprint of the can on it.  I really don't care for it anymore and rarely eat it.  I do enjoy fresh cranberry/orange sauce but nobody else in the family does...sigh..

My mother used to make stuffing the way her mother made it:  boiled up some potatoes and mash them, soak some bread in water then squeeze the water out by hand, mix it all together with chopped onion, Bell's Seasoning (a seasoning mix that is mostly sage), and an egg.  It was stuffed inside the bird.  A lot of people thought it was a strange recipe but as a child, I loved it. 

I've tried to make it myself but it never comes out right.  My own kids prefer my own bread stuffing, but I still miss Ma's stuffing.

Roe

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #76 on: November 28, 2011, 12:09:55 PM »
Got to have tamales on Christmas morning.

I'm kinda worried about this year as we now live in an area where homemade tamales are almost unheard of and buying frozen tamales...no way!  I think my family would disown me. 

I'm going to have to bite the bullet and actually attempt to make some this year, if I can manage to find the ingredients.  (heard Wegmans has corn husks and maza so I'm excited) 

Valentines Mommy

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #77 on: November 28, 2011, 12:22:16 PM »
If you can find a mexican backery, ask them if they will sell you some masa.  Then tamale assembly should get easier.  Amazon also has a good selection of ethnic groceries, including the corn husks.

BabyMama

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #78 on: November 28, 2011, 02:11:44 PM »
OzDiva, you should send me your address so I can send you any church cookbook from my state. About 80% of the recipes will ask for some sort of condensed soup. The other 20% will consist of Jell-o recipes, Ritz crackers, Cool Whip, or something completely bizarre and off the wall, like beaver meat.  ;D
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Bethalize

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #79 on: November 28, 2011, 02:29:32 PM »
^ I actually like those...

Seconded. . .

I second these too.  the most exotic flavor is grapefruit.  Absolutely delicious.

Really? Are they the ones made with sugar, glucose syrup and pectin? Chuck in a bit of citric acid for flavour and some colour and bam! Festive sweeties. We don't have any other flavour available here.

Kimblee

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #80 on: November 28, 2011, 02:39:29 PM »
We had the relish tray too. Sweet gerkins, sour gerkins, black olives, green olives and slices of bread and butter pickles.

But i never could figure out what it was for. My grandmother would slap me in the face if I ate the little things off it and tell me it "wasn't for snacking" but I swear that's what the adults did too. (and my male cousins, who were allowed to 'snack")

I miss the relish tray because my mom always made it and it was so pretty, but even when i was grown I looked, i didn't touch.

Are you saying that your grandmother expected the relish tray to remain uneaten?  ???

Something like that. I think it was more an excuse to smack the **** out of me. (and occasionally my female cousins, but I was the youngest so I wasn't smart enough to avoid her.)

She seemed to think the relish tray was for some purpose beyond just snagging a few salty yummies and eating them. But male cousins and adults could do whatever they wanted with it. Our family is a complicated toxic mess. I'm glad i got out of that nastiness years ago.

Now the only weirdness at holidays is my stepmom who makes dates stuffed with peanut butter and rolled in suger... YUM!
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Zilla

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #81 on: November 28, 2011, 02:42:56 PM »
Interesting assumption. I think a lot of people actually prefer the taste or texture of the canned jelly.


Yep.  While I am not a fan of it but I do like the bright red of it sitting on a plate quivering in it's excitement at being sliced.  And the ribbed sides aid in letting those who slice it know how thick or if they wanted a double.


(at least that is how I see it in my head at this boring dinners growing up lol)

weeblewobble

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #82 on: November 28, 2011, 03:12:15 PM »
Got to have tamales on Christmas morning.


We have enchiladas for Easter.  My sister's birthday usually falls close to Easter, and enchiladas are her favorite food. :)

The Wild One, Forever

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #83 on: November 28, 2011, 04:34:12 PM »
Got to have tamales on Christmas morning.

I'm kinda worried about this year as we now live in an area where homemade tamales are almost unheard of and buying frozen tamales...no way!  I think my family would disown me. 

I'm going to have to bite the bullet and actually attempt to make some this year, if I can manage to find the ingredients.  (heard Wegmans has corn husks and maza so I'm excited)

I became addicted to tamales at Christmas time when we lived in California.  I miss them so, and am bound and determined to find some this year.  Since Katrina, our area's Mexican population has increased quite a bit, so I'm thinking with a little research, I'll be able to find them.  I do the whole turkey and ham dinner with all the sides at Christmas, but tamales make a nice addition! 

Let us know how yours turn out!  I don't have time to attempt them this year, and never have tried to make them, but I recently saw corn husks at the Winn-Dixie. 
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Sweettooth

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #84 on: November 28, 2011, 04:51:33 PM »
Everyone who has married into my family finds it bizarre that we have chicken instead of turkey for both Thanksgiving and Christmas. I guess my grandmother never cared for turkey, and so we don't have it--just roasted chicken (not carved at the table) and country ham. The funny part is, my brother (who is 36) didn't know until just last year that we've been eating chicken all these years. He just assumed it was turkey . . .

This year we went wild and had TWO kinds of cranberries, the canned sliced kind and the whole berry kind, but I think that's just because someone picked up the wrong can at the store.

jimithing

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #85 on: November 28, 2011, 05:14:52 PM »
For me personally, I find it to be an odd juxtaposition that people often spend hours slaving over a home cooked turkey, and then serve sides that are made with canned, processed foods. As a PP mentioned it does seem to be a holdover from the 1950s marketing targeted towards house wives. People became used to those tastes and are now nostalgic about them, and pass that nostalgia down. I guess since as I've gotten older, my palate for very salty and processed foods has gone way down, I don't fully relate to that view. For one, I blow up like a blimp from water retention if I have too much salt and carbs at the same time.  I do love certain processed foods in certain contexts - White Castle anyone? - but a meal with sides primarily consisting of them? No thanks :).

I find this akin to saying that people just "don't know better." You are forgetting one important factor. There are people who genuinely like those overprocessed, canned foods.

We had a thread on here a couple of years ago, that actually got quite heated, about canned frosting vs. homemade. I will pick frosting made with shortening any day, compared to home made frosting. People think it's disgusting, but I can't get enough. There is a local grocery store that makes cupcakes piled with that artificial frosting, and I get one weekly, because I like it.

Kaesha

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #86 on: November 28, 2011, 05:23:37 PM »
My mom found a turkey-shaped cookie cutter years ago and now takes slices of the gelled, canned cranberry sauce and cuts them into turkeys. Each dinner guest gets a cranberry turkey on a small plate. One year, as a joke, she told her son-in-law (my sis' husband) that his Thanksgiving task was to cut disks of carrots into the shape of turkey feet. Two for each cranberry turkey. Despite the laughter and being told she wasn't serious, he carefully cut two tiny turkey feet for each cranberry turkey out of the carrot slices. New family tradition born.

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Kariachi

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #87 on: November 28, 2011, 05:35:50 PM »
My Solstice Scone. I make it every Christmas for breakfast, going so far as to be the first one up so that it'll be ready before we're done with gifts.

It's the singular that hints to the bizarre, my ex refused to even call it a scone.

One pound white cheddar cheese and one pound applewood smoked bacon, mixed with enough dough for a recipe calling for four strips of bacon and 1/4 cup cheddar cheese, plop into round cake pan, bake while it fries in it's own grease, slice, serves four to six.

Not warthog sweat bizarre, but certainly something different.

Um, that would be shredded cheddar cheese? And do you cook the bacon first? Because this would send my family into raptures on Christmas morning.

Shredded white cheddar (from NYS if you want to be true to my 'recipe'), and you chop the bacon, then fry it crisp.
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Shores

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #88 on: November 28, 2011, 05:50:22 PM »
I find green bean casseroles made without condensed cream soup and cranberry sauce that doesn't come from a can utterly bizarre.
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Brentwood

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Re: Bizarre Holiday Food Traditions
« Reply #89 on: November 28, 2011, 06:55:39 PM »
I just put a post-Thanksgiving casserole into the oven: Layer leftover stuffing and slices of turkey in a baking dish. Top with mashed potatoes. Pour gravy over all, bake about 20 minutes at 375. Serve with vegetables and leftover cranberry sauce.