Author Topic: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt  (Read 1074047 times)

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magician5

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6870 on: February 02, 2013, 12:01:23 AM »
To add a third option, I was always taught the "big hand" (hour), the "little hand" (minute), and the second hand.  I distinctly remember seeing a clock with a second hand for the first time.  I'm sure they existed, but neither my parents or my schools had them.  I remember sitting in my doctor's office when I was 7 years old, already competent at telling time, and "discovering" the second hand.

All my life, when the "which hand is which" question has come up, someone always seems to say "When Micky's short hand points to three and Micky's long hand points to twelve, it's three o'Clock."
« Last Edit: February 02, 2013, 12:08:21 AM by magician5 »
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Iris

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6871 on: February 02, 2013, 12:19:17 AM »
To add a third option, I was always taught the "big hand" (hour), the "little hand" (minute), and the second hand.  I distinctly remember seeing a clock with a second hand for the first time.  I'm sure they existed, but neither my parents or my schools had them.  I remember sitting in my doctor's office when I was 7 years old, already competent at telling time, and "discovering" the second hand.

All my life, when the "which hand is which" question has come up, someone always seems to say "When Micky's short hand points to three and Micky's long hand points to twelve, it's three o'Clock."

Yes, I've always known 'big hand' for minutes and 'little hand' for hours. Distressingly I still occasionally have to teach 12-13 year olds how to tell analogue time and they are fairly universally familiar with that nomenclature for the hands, so it's certainly common around here.
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Yvaine

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6872 on: February 02, 2013, 12:45:54 AM »
I have heard long hand and short hand, now that I think of it. Just not big hand and little hand, for which I'm glad because the short/wide vs. long/narrow issue would have given me fits as a little kid.

Slartibartfast

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6873 on: February 02, 2013, 02:42:23 AM »
I had to disable the clock on my computer screen when I was a librarian, because so many of my library kids (ages 10-17) refused to try to read the time off the analog clock on the wall and leaned over my desk to read the time on my screen instead.

starry diadem

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6874 on: February 02, 2013, 04:10:59 AM »

This might make some people's brains hurt - in the UK, we have no comparable word for soda/pop/coke etc. Maybe 'fizzy drinks' or 'soft drinks' though the latter also covers stuff like juice, tea, etc. Soda means soda water, pop means a genre of music, and coke means coca cola exclusively. I do wonder why we don't have a word for that, actually.

Not quite true.  It may be a regional or an age thing, but as a child in the NE of England 40 years ago, I had pop.  It was the generic name for all soft drinks - cherryade, lemonade, coke.  I'll admit I haven't heard it since I moved away, so it may be completely regional.
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Barney girl

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6875 on: February 02, 2013, 04:21:53 AM »
I think you're right. I grew up in the north east of England too and we would say pop. It's not a term I'd hear now, but I don't know if that's because of locality, changes over the years or because I've never liked fizzy drinks, so wouldn't need to use it any way.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6876 on: February 02, 2013, 04:25:32 AM »

This might make some people's brains hurt - in the UK, we have no comparable word for soda/pop/coke etc. Maybe 'fizzy drinks' or 'soft drinks' though the latter also covers stuff like juice, tea, etc. Soda means soda water, pop means a genre of music, and coke means coca cola exclusively. I do wonder why we don't have a word for that, actually.

Not quite true.  It may be a regional or an age thing, but as a child in the NE of England 40 years ago, I had pop.  It was the generic name for all soft drinks - cherryade, lemonade, coke.  I'll admit I haven't heard it since I moved away, so it may be completely regional.

I live in Birmingham (West Midlands of England). "Pop" is the universal term hereabouts, for fizzy soft drinks.

laud_shy_girl

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6877 on: February 02, 2013, 05:22:50 AM »
The second hand of a clock is the minutes hand (the long one). 

To tell time on a clock one only needs one hand, the hour hand.  At one o'clock it will be on the one.  As the hour progresses it nudges along towards the two.  You can roughly figure out how much after one it is simply by where the hour hand falls between the one and the two (only 1/4 of the way to two?  Its 1:15ish.  Just over halfway to two?  Its 1:38ish.  etc).  To be more precise in what time it is, many clocks/watches will add a second (as in not the first, but another, second one) hand.  This hand will tell you the actual minutes after the hour the first hand is.

The third hand is the one that shows the actual seconds-as-in-unit-of-time, and is often not included.

You can google image "single hand watch" for examples of what an 'hours only' handed clock/watch look like. Sun dials are also single 'hand' clocks.

Okay, I'm glad I'm not the only one who has thought about two different meanings for the "second hand"! Maybe sunnygirl is right and it's some kind of geographic distinction, but here in the Midwest we are at the intersection of two different preferences. Kind of like how we say both "soda" and "pop." Usually I encounter this confusion when someone says, urgently, "What does the second hand read?!"  :-\ A little more pressure than requesting a carbonated beverage...

I'm from the Midwest and have never encountered first-second-third hands, only hour-minute-second. But soda/pop was a source of endless debate at my college, with a sizable minority coming in from the South and arguing that they're all Coke.
This might make some people's brains hurt - in the UK, we have no comparable word for soda/pop/coke etc. Maybe 'fizzy drinks' or 'soft drinks' though the latter also covers stuff like juice, tea, etc. Soda means soda water, pop means a genre of music, and coke means coca cola exclusively. I do wonder why we don't have a word for that, actually.

I'm in the uk and pop as a term for cordials/squash and fizzy drinks is the norm in my region. In fact when I was a child the "Pop Man" would come round in a large open backed truck with creates and creates of different fizzy drinks. A bit like a milk man but with pop. You gave him back your old bottles and he gave you new ones filled with more carbonated heaven.
It's a midlands thing apparently. Family that live more in the north think Pop is a term only used for carbonated drinks. 

I have to go find some dandelion and burdock now.
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Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6878 on: February 02, 2013, 06:48:24 AM »

I'm in the uk and pop as a term for cordials/squash and fizzy drinks is the norm in my region. In fact when I was a child the "Pop Man" would come round in a large open backed truck with creates and creates of different fizzy drinks. A bit like a milk man but with pop. You gave him back your old bottles and he gave you new ones filled with more carbonated heaven.
It's a midlands thing apparently. Family that live more in the north think Pop is a term only used for carbonated drinks. 

I have to go find some dandelion and burdock now.

Mr Chick is from the North West and remembers the Lemonade Lorry - and money back on the empty bottles. He will join you for a dandelion and burdock; his sister drank American Cream Soda. He thinks 'pop' is carbonated drinks, the ones that went 'pop!' when you opened the bottle, not squash.

Where I was born we had white lemonade and brown lemonade. As far as I know, the only difference was that brown lemonade had a little caramel colouring in it, but I certainly thought it tasted different and I liked it better. It did mean that once you got to the age of using lemonade as a mixer, you had to specify 'martini and white, please'.

sunnygirl

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6879 on: February 02, 2013, 08:59:40 AM »
Ah, interesting, thanks. I'd never heard the word "pop" (except to refer to music) until I started reading American forums -- and then it took me ages to figure out it meant a type of drinks. (I thought it meant some kind of pudding or sweets for some reason.) I'm a Londoner and 20s. Britain has some of the most diverse regional dialects and accents. (Anyone read Bill Bryson's books on the subject? They're fascinating.)
« Last Edit: February 02, 2013, 09:33:49 AM by sunnygirl »

Luci

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6880 on: February 02, 2013, 10:23:33 AM »
I grew up in southern Illinois drinking 'soda'.

I went to college central Illinois 150 miles away, and there it was always 'pop', both with the northern Illinois kids and the local students.

Our best friends lived in Nebraska and Iowa, and they were not consistant, either.

So, I think when you talk midwest US, you still can't generalize.

I order diet cola whereever I go, and even in Atlanta GA, land of coke = anything, they understood me.

Jocelyn

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6881 on: February 02, 2013, 10:42:12 AM »
They still deny snoring.  I don't get it.
I resisted having a sleep study done, even though my parents insisted I must have sleep apnea.
They did the study on 2 nights- once for diagnostic, one night to fine-tune the CPAP machine. I've gotten quite used to it, and I do sleep much better. And after I heard that during my original sleep study, my blood oxygenation level dropped to 70% at one point, I was pretty motivated to use it.
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Jocelyn

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6882 on: February 02, 2013, 10:52:32 AM »
I grew up in southern Illinois drinking 'soda'.

I went to college central Illinois 150 miles away, and there it was always 'pop', both with the northern Illinois kids and the local students.

Our best friends lived in Nebraska and Iowa, and they were not consistant, either.

So, I think when you talk midwest US, you still can't generalize.

I order diet cola whereever I go, and even in Atlanta GA, land of coke = anything, they understood me.
And, as an Ehellion, I have taken to saying 'a refreshing beverage'. >:D

Octavia

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6883 on: February 02, 2013, 11:05:24 AM »
One of my friends is taking an introductory class on how to use a computer. The class is online. And it requires the students to download the course materials, set up accounts on the class forum, etc. before the first session. Chapter 1 of the course starts with instruction on how to turn on the computer.  ???
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Jaelle

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Re: Exchanges with People that Make Your Brain Hurt
« Reply #6884 on: February 02, 2013, 11:48:43 AM »

This might make some people's brains hurt - in the UK, we have no comparable word for soda/pop/coke etc. Maybe 'fizzy drinks' or 'soft drinks' though the latter also covers stuff like juice, tea, etc. Soda means soda water, pop means a genre of music, and coke means coca cola exclusively. I do wonder why we don't have a word for that, actually.

Not quite true.  It may be a regional or an age thing, but as a child in the NE of England 40 years ago, I had pop.  It was the generic name for all soft drinks - cherryade, lemonade, coke.  I'll admit I haven't heard it since I moved away, so it may be completely regional.

Western New Yorkers say "pop" for anything carbonated.

I know it's used elsewhere in the U.S., but it's so pervasive here that when DH and I were at Walt Disney World 10 years ago, and he ordered a Coke at one restaurant by saying "a medium pop," the clerk looked at him and said, "You're from Buffalo, aren't you?" :D
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