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Author Topic: Who came up with this useless product?  (Read 155468 times)

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Mental Magpie

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #345 on: May 07, 2012, 10:00:38 AM »
FIT . The stuff you clean vegetables with.   Domestic goddess Martha Stewart said that if something was that dirty to begin with, she wasn't going to eat it.

But... veggies are grown in the dirt... some dirt is bound to get on them! (Not that I have any idea what Fit is; I just do a vinegar & salt soak to kill the bugs.)

I think Martha Stewart was saying that if water couldn't get it off, she wasn't going to eat it.  (As in if the dirt was so bad that she had to buy a product (FIT) instead of just using water, the vegetable was in too bad a condition for her to eat).

lady_disdain

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #346 on: May 07, 2012, 12:22:46 PM »
FIT . The stuff you clean vegetables with.   Domestic goddess Martha Stewart said that if something was that dirty to begin with, she wasn't going to eat it.

But... veggies are grown in the dirt... some dirt is bound to get on them! (Not that I have any idea what Fit is; I just do a vinegar & salt soak to kill the bugs.)

I think Martha Stewart was saying that if water couldn't get it off, she wasn't going to eat it.  (As in if the dirt was so bad that she had to buy a product (FIT) instead of just using water, the vegetable was in too bad a condition for her to eat).

That strikes me as a rather precious attitude. Where does she think food is grown and how does it get to her kitchen? The great outdoors has bugs and germs, animals pee on plants, machines (or people) harvested the food, it has been placed in wooden containers that have been used many times and exposed to the elements, people have handled it, etc. Each of those interactions adds a chance that some harmful bacteria is on the food. It seems to make a lot of sense to me to use some sort of cleaner on things you are going to eat. I saw a couple of cholera epidemics and that taught me to always clean food.

And I am very much not a germophobe.

Namárië

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #347 on: May 07, 2012, 12:27:45 PM »
FIT . The stuff you clean vegetables with.   Domestic goddess Martha Stewart said that if something was that dirty to begin with, she wasn't going to eat it.

But... veggies are grown in the dirt... some dirt is bound to get on them! (Not that I have any idea what Fit is; I just do a vinegar & salt soak to kill the bugs.)

I think Martha Stewart was saying that if water couldn't get it off, she wasn't going to eat it.  (As in if the dirt was so bad that she had to buy a product (FIT) instead of just using water, the vegetable was in too bad a condition for her to eat).

That strikes me as a rather precious attitude. Where does she think food is grown and how does it get to her kitchen? The great outdoors has bugs and germs, animals pee on plants, machines (or people) harvested the food, it has been placed in wooden containers that have been used many times and exposed to the elements, people have handled it, etc. Each of those interactions adds a chance that some harmful bacteria is on the food. It seems to make a lot of sense to me to use some sort of cleaner on things you are going to eat. I saw a couple of cholera epidemics and that taught me to always clean food.

And I am very much not a germophobe.

Not to mention that poop is used as a fertilizer...  :-X
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Mental Magpie

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #348 on: May 07, 2012, 02:19:54 PM »
I still think y'all are missing the point.  She does want her food to be clean, but if water won't get it off (which is really how most people wash their vegetables), then whatever is on there that needs chemicals to get it off is something she doesn't want to eat.  Water will get off almost everything (dirt, fertilizer, germs, et cetera); if she needs chemicals to clean her food, then there is something wrong with the food.  It's overkill, I guess, to need chemicals to clean your food when water does just fine.

To me it's like getting sanitizer for way down in the depths of your toilet (past where you can see); why does that need to be germ free?  Clean, yes, but germ free?  What are you reaching down there with or to get that you need there to be no germs all the way down there?

Namárië

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #349 on: May 07, 2012, 02:33:12 PM »
I think I get what she means. I just disagree, though my methods don't involve chemicals. I don't want any extra bug protein in my salads. :)
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I mostly don't make stuff, but sometimes I do: http://initiationcreation.blogspot.com

#borecore

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #350 on: May 07, 2012, 02:51:57 PM »
FIT . The stuff you clean vegetables with.   Domestic goddess Martha Stewart said that if something was that dirty to begin with, she wasn't going to eat it.

But... veggies are grown in the dirt... some dirt is bound to get on them! (Not that I have any idea what Fit is; I just do a vinegar & salt soak to kill the bugs.)

I think Martha Stewart was saying that if water couldn't get it off, she wasn't going to eat it.  (As in if the dirt was so bad that she had to buy a product (FIT) instead of just using water, the vegetable was in too bad a condition for her to eat).

That strikes me as a rather precious attitude. Where does she think food is grown and how does it get to her kitchen? The great outdoors has bugs and germs, animals pee on plants, machines (or people) harvested the food, it has been placed in wooden containers that have been used many times and exposed to the elements, people have handled it, etc. Each of those interactions adds a chance that some harmful bacteria is on the food. It seems to make a lot of sense to me to use some sort of cleaner on things you are going to eat. I saw a couple of cholera epidemics and that taught me to always clean food.

And I am very much not a germophobe.

Family friends who know Ms. Stewart report that she has been known to be both prima donna and germaphobe. Also something of an actress/expert celebrity who knows when to say what, so I'm not certain her comments about this product are to be taken as absolute truth (either about the value of the product or her desire to eat things that have merely been rinsed).

To add a product to the mix:
Why are there incense cones? They always seem to smell worse or be more cheaply made than the sticks, for which there are many more holders made already.
Is there something I'm missing?

Midnight Kitty

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #351 on: May 07, 2012, 03:00:21 PM »
Not to mention that poop is used as a fertilizer...  :-X
OK, I understand the sentiment, but I can't let this one pass without clarification since this is my profession and we are trying to get the general population over the "ick factor."

Biosolids in the United States are used to replenish nutrients in agricultural land.  The biosolids are treated to reduce pathogens (bacteria and viruses) and their attractiveness to vectors such as flies and vermin.  They are stabilized to reduce odors.  Then they are tested to make sure the metal concentrations do not pose a threat to the environment or human health.  The land application sites are carefully selected and permitted.

Biosolids are better for the crops than inorganic fertilizers which are often made from petroleum products.  Their nutrients are in a form which plants can use and they contain trace nutrients not available in inorganic fertilizers.

Feed the land so the land can feed us.

[MK gets off her soapbox and returns this thread to its original topic]
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lady_disdain

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #352 on: May 07, 2012, 03:12:06 PM »
I still think y'all are missing the point.  She does want her food to be clean, but if water won't get it off (which is really how most people wash their vegetables), then whatever is on there that needs chemicals to get it off is something she doesn't want to eat.  Water will get off almost everything (dirt, fertilizer, germs, et cetera); if she needs chemicals to clean her food, then there is something wrong with the food.  It's overkill, I guess, to need chemicals to clean your food when water does just fine.

To me it's like getting sanitizer for way down in the depths of your toilet (past where you can see); why does that need to be germ free?  Clean, yes, but germ free?  What are you reaching down there with or to get that you need there to be no germs all the way down there?

I understand that point. I just don't agree with it. To me, washing food with just water is like washing your hands with just water after going to the bathroom and heading towards the kitchen. After all, I am going to eat the food (unlike the depths of the toilet).

Considering cholera, salmonella contamination, leptospirosis and other food borne disease, it doesn't seem like overkill at all.

Kimblee

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #353 on: May 07, 2012, 03:59:34 PM »
To add a product to the mix:
Why are there incense cones? They always seem to smell worse or be more cheaply made than the sticks, for which there are many more holders made already.
Is there something I'm missing?

Maybe you've used bad quality cones? Because the ones i buy are really good. They smell wonderful and i like them because the ash is kept in a neat little cone shape and easily disposed of instead of "dripping" all over my dresser. (I have a nice marble combo incense burner, but the darn sticks still drip.)

I still buy sticks of course, since one of my favorite brands has just the type of cones you described (they smell awful!) but when I can get good quality cones I prefer them.

RingTailedLemur

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #354 on: May 07, 2012, 04:01:53 PM »
Not to mention that poop is used as a fertilizer...  :-X
OK, I understand the sentiment, but I can't let this one pass without clarification since this is my profession and we are trying to get the general population over the "ick factor."

Biosolids in the United States are used to replenish nutrients in agricultural land.  The biosolids are treated to reduce pathogens (bacteria and viruses) and their attractiveness to vectors such as flies and vermin.  They are stabilized to reduce odors.  Then they are tested to make sure the metal concentrations do not pose a threat to the environment or human health.  The land application sites are carefully selected and permitted.

Biosolids are better for the crops than inorganic fertilizers which are often made from petroleum products.  Their nutrients are in a form which plants can use and they contain trace nutrients not available in inorganic fertilizers.

Feed the land so the land can feed us.

[MK gets off her soapbox and returns this thread to its original topic]

I don't know where Namarie is, but it may not be the case there.  Where I am, the fertiliser is quite often taken direct from horse to ground!

#borecore

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #355 on: May 07, 2012, 04:03:34 PM »
To add a product to the mix:
Why are there incense cones? They always seem to smell worse or be more cheaply made than the sticks, for which there are many more holders made already.
Is there something I'm missing?

Maybe you've used bad quality cones? Because the ones i buy are really good. They smell wonderful and i like them because the ash is kept in a neat little cone shape and easily disposed of instead of "dripping" all over my dresser. (I have a nice marble combo incense burner, but the darn sticks still drip.)

I still buy sticks of course, since one of my favorite brands has just the type of cones you described (they smell awful!) but when I can get good quality cones I prefer them.

Hmm, maybe I just need to look harder! I like the idea of neater ashes, though we most often use BF's clay bowl with sand in it for incense sticks, so the ashes from the stick just blend with the sand, and it hasn't been an issue. With my wooden burner that holds the stick at an angle, it's a crapshoot.

Do they burn about the same length of time (the good ones, I mean)?

Kimblee

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #356 on: May 07, 2012, 04:11:28 PM »
To add a product to the mix:
Why are there incense cones? They always seem to smell worse or be more cheaply made than the sticks, for which there are many more holders made already.
Is there something I'm missing?

Maybe you've used bad quality cones? Because the ones i buy are really good. They smell wonderful and i like them because the ash is kept in a neat little cone shape and easily disposed of instead of "dripping" all over my dresser. (I have a nice marble combo incense burner, but the darn sticks still drip.)

I still buy sticks of course, since one of my favorite brands has just the type of cones you described (they smell awful!) but when I can get good quality cones I prefer them.

Hmm, maybe I just need to look harder! I like the idea of neater ashes, though we most often use BF's clay bowl with sand in it for incense sticks, so the ashes from the stick just blend with the sand, and it hasn't been an issue. With my wooden burner that holds the stick at an angle, it's a crapshoot.

Do they burn about the same length of time (the good ones, I mean)?

It kinda depends. My favorite type burn a little shorter than the same brand sticks, but the scent seems to stick around longer (Its not stronger per say, but it lasts.) Another brand I've bought the cones last longer and the scent is gentler. (Gonesh I think its called. my "pet" scent is "Perfumes of Ancient Times") And my favorite incense brand of all has carpy cones and they burn fast, have thick ikky smoke and smell like butt. I buy only sticks from them. A lot of "cheap" incense, where the stick is good, the cone will be awful. (And some expensive brands too I'm sure. But I stick with cheap, so i can't advise anyone of expensive incense.)

Namárië

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #357 on: May 07, 2012, 04:37:06 PM »
Not to mention that poop is used as a fertilizer...  :-X
OK, I understand the sentiment, but I can't let this one pass without clarification since this is my profession and we are trying to get the general population over the "ick factor."

Biosolids in the United States are used to replenish nutrients in agricultural land.  The biosolids are treated to reduce pathogens (bacteria and viruses) and their attractiveness to vectors such as flies and vermin.  They are stabilized to reduce odors.  Then they are tested to make sure the metal concentrations do not pose a threat to the environment or human health.  The land application sites are carefully selected and permitted.

Biosolids are better for the crops than inorganic fertilizers which are often made from petroleum products.  Their nutrients are in a form which plants can use and they contain trace nutrients not available in inorganic fertilizers.

Feed the land so the land can feed us.

[MK gets off her soapbox and returns this thread to its original topic]

I don't know where Namarie is, but it may not be the case there.  Where I am, the fertiliser is quite often taken direct from horse to ground!

Yes, it is much the same where I am. It doesn't bother me, but I sure as sugar won't eat my CSA veggies with just a water rinse! :)
Competence is a trap!
I mostly don't make stuff, but sometimes I do: http://initiationcreation.blogspot.com

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #358 on: May 07, 2012, 06:25:58 PM »
Not to mention that poop is used as a fertilizer...  :-X
OK, I understand the sentiment, but I can't let this one pass without clarification since this is my profession and we are trying to get the general population over the "ick factor."

Biosolids in the United States are used to replenish nutrients in agricultural land.  The biosolids are treated to reduce pathogens (bacteria and viruses) and their attractiveness to vectors such as flies and vermin.  They are stabilized to reduce odors.  Then they are tested to make sure the metal concentrations do not pose a threat to the environment or human health.  The land application sites are carefully selected and permitted.

Biosolids are better for the crops than inorganic fertilizers which are often made from petroleum products.  Their nutrients are in a form which plants can use and they contain trace nutrients not available in inorganic fertilizers.

Feed the land so the land can feed us.

[MK gets off her soapbox and returns this thread to its original topic]

I don't know where Namarie is, but it may not be the case there.  Where I am, the fertiliser is quite often taken direct from horse to ground!

Midnight Kitty was talking about human poop, not animal.  I'm not sure what kind Namarie was referring to.

Where I am, manure is usually aged a bit before being spread but it isn't unheard of for it to be put on the fields fresh.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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mechtilde

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #359 on: May 07, 2012, 06:44:24 PM »
Incence cones are very handy for going into one of these:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A4uchermann

He is a Rauechermann. He opens up so you can put the cone inside, and the smoke comes out of his mouth. We have a couple- one traditional, the other a witch with smoke coming out of her cauldron.
NE England