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Author Topic: Who came up with this useless product?  (Read 154766 times)

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allthelittledaisies

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #540 on: August 23, 2014, 06:11:01 PM »
The most interesting thing about this thread is that for every person who thinks, "who came up with this useless product?" there's someone else who actually thinks that product is useful! What a wonderful world!

After reading the whole thread so far, that is my favorite part, too! Also I now have several uses, and a burning need for, a melon-baller. How fabulous!

Sirius

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #541 on: August 23, 2014, 08:24:34 PM »
I use a melon baller to scoop the seeds out of apple halves. Beat better than trying to wrestle with a paring knife.

I have seen banana and hot dig slicers at stores.  Cutting a banana is so difficult it requires a special tool?

I'm tired, and I saw that as "hog slicers." 

Back when I was a youngster we had a cheese slicer - rectangle shaped, with what looked like small serrated knives equally spaced.  Looked like this:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/161378073042?item=161378073042&lgeo=1&vectorid=229466

What my mother had to say when she tried to use it to slice cheese almost blistered the paneling.

JoW

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #542 on: August 23, 2014, 10:39:26 PM »
A hotdog or banana slice is about the same diameter as a toddler's windpipe.  Cutting those slices in half before giving them to a toddler is important.  But I think the slicer is a gimmick.  Especially since the one I saw in a store was made to look like a dachshund.




shhh its me

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #543 on: August 24, 2014, 11:18:53 AM »
A hotdog or banana slice is about the same diameter as a toddler's windpipe.  Cutting those slices in half before giving them to a toddler is important.  But I think the slicer is a gimmick.  Especially since the one I saw in a store was made to look like a dachshund.

The hotdog slicer seem to be more dicer but the banana slicers seem to just slice.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #544 on: August 24, 2014, 01:11:44 PM »
I'm sure many will find it useful but it made me giggle. I was looking for something to ahem, enhance my cleavage, with some of my outfits for my upcoming vacation. Settled on some inserts you put in your bra designed to push the boobage up.but that's not it.

I also came across some for the nether regions; some sort of padding/insert to hide camel toe! Ok, whatever but I laughed.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #545 on: August 24, 2014, 02:06:03 PM »
The Swash

http://www.cincinnati.com/story/money/business/2014/07/16/pg-takes-on-the-dry-cleaner-with-a-new-at-home-device/12728113/

This is a rather large piece of equipment that deodorizes clothing and smooths out wrinkles between washings or dry cleanings. The device is plugged in to an electrical outlet but does not require a water source. A piece of clothing is hung inside the machine and a "pod" is added. The process takes ten minutes. The process does not remove stains. The swash costs $499 and the pods are $6.99 each. The article mentions that the device may be useful in airport lounges but is designed for home use.

I can almost see the airport lounge application if someone is someone is reeking and wrinkled and  is in a furious hurry to meet somebody important but no way on earth can I see giving house space to this thing. There are dry cleaner sheets that work in the dryer and cost a fraction of the pod price.  The sheets deodorize and the dryer action will take out the wrinkles. You can also use the sheets to remove stains which the swash cannot do. The worst thing about the swash, in my opinion, is the space it would take up. I have small rooms and there isn't anywhere in my closet, bathroom or bedroom where this thing would fit without causing  a problem.

Someone didn't do their research. They have a product that already does that.   It's called Dryel, you can buy it at Walmart or the grocery store for about $10.00.

Twelve pods are $6.99, which helps considerably. "A package of 12 Swash pods will cost $6.99 and come in a variety of scents."

There are very few times I would use it, particularly since we don't go into smoky bars or parties anymore, so I pretty much agree: useless product for most of us.

I saw a comparison of the Swash versus steam dryer or plain dryeron GMA.The swash really did perform much better in removing odor & wrinkles. A chambray shirt looked pressed even around the colar. If I still did a bunch of weekly dry cleaning I might invest. We used to spend a minimum of $120 a month on dry cleaning. If I could have cut that by 40% I could recover my cost in less than a year. Also the convenience of being able to refresh an item that I had forgotten to get cleaned at home would be beneficial. They said you could do 2 items at a time so around .30 for each piece for the pods.

#borecore

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #546 on: August 24, 2014, 02:29:27 PM »
If you figure that you want to 'pay it off' in a year, and you're doing a shirt and a pair of pants a week, and a suit (two pieces) twice a month, then it's actually $3.58 per item (if you clean double the shirts & pants, it's $2.24/item; if you mete out the cost over 5 years, it goes down to $.93/item & $.68/item, respectively), plus the cost of electricity. Still cheaper than dry cleaning (for suit pieces at least), but as far as I can tell, it's not a substitute for dry cleaning period (i.e., you'll still want to get things thoroughly cleaned every few cycles). The main thing keeping up the cost is the assumption of fixed prices for the pods.

Of course, if you price it out over the life of the machine, it gets lower, but I am not sure how many households need it enough to justify that initial output. So I guess I wouldn't call it a "useless product," just not one that's going to be commonplace anytime soon.

My not-quite-useless but still "What?!" product: Cellphone cases that absorb every speck of dirt. I just replaced my perfectly functional red Body Glove case (with a black and metallic one that's equally functional) because I felt like a slob. No amount of soaking, washing, scrubbing and stain removing got the black smudges off all eight corners of the thing. Manufacturers know that the modern consumer carries a phone everywhere, so why not make the case non-absorbent? (The label says it's "antimicrobial," but apparently not antifilth!)

BioformCassie

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #547 on: December 19, 2014, 07:31:37 AM »

Try a pickle picker upper
http://smile.amazon.com/Animewild-1365-Norpro-Deluxe-Pincher/dp/B000PSBNCG/ref=sr_1_1?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1407980331&sr=1-1&keywords=pickle

Thank you for posting this. I've seen one before and couldn't possibly imagine what its purpose was.

We've always used melon ballers for scooping out the insides of zuchinni to make stuffed zucchini boats.

wheeitsme

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Re: Who came up with this useless product?
« Reply #548 on: December 19, 2014, 11:37:45 AM »

Try a pickle picker upper
http://smile.amazon.com/Animewild-1365-Norpro-Deluxe-Pincher/dp/B000PSBNCG/ref=sr_1_1?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1407980331&sr=1-1&keywords=pickle

Thank you for posting this. I've seen one before and couldn't possibly imagine what its purpose was.

We've always used melon ballers for scooping out the insides of zuchinni to make stuffed zucchini boats.

We actually have one of those.  Great for olive jars!