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Author Topic: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter  (Read 2686 times)

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heathert

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S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« on: February 15, 2012, 04:34:59 PM »
I am moving at the end of March to another state and unfortunately I can't take my hairdresser with me.  :'(  I have wavy-yet-fine hair that has a cowlick in the back. I really NEED to know when I call a beauty salon or shop if they have someone equipped to handle this kind of hair (or better yet, has this kind of hair themselves).   

I am not sure why but usually the general reaction to my inquiry is "Oh, well ALL of our stylists can handle that kind of hair!"  What I want to say back is "Actually, I can guarantee most, if not all of them, cannot handle it."  Instead I usually sigh and just end the call.  I realize they all want a shot at making money off of me,  but it took me years to find my current hairdresser after much dissatisfaction.  My hair is not easy to cut, I admit it. I do have photos of myself after my current hairdresser has cut my hair in the past that I plan to take with me, but I will be living out in a rural area; with gas prices being what they are, I prefer not to drive an hour one-way and traipse all over the closest city with this photo only to be disappointed.  Plus, I am planning on getting a job in sales, so I need to look my best.

Can the hairstylists out there (or anyone who has had this issue) give me some suggestions on what I can say to explain not just anyone will do? I have actually said that very thing to no avail, so is there some turn of phrase that would make them realize that they need to just say if they have someone specific who can accommodate me? Also, any insight on why this has to be so difficult is appreciated as well.  :)

hobish

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2012, 04:44:05 PM »
When you get out there, look for someone with hair like yours and ask where they go. I've been doing that lately since my hairdresser can't cut hair anymore, and even total strangers have been very receptive and helpful.

It's alright, man. I'm only bleeding, man. Stay hungry, stay free, and do the best you can.
~Gaslight Anthem

doodlemor

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2012, 06:05:36 PM »
My hairdresser is thinking about retiring, and I have been going to the same salon for many, many  years.  My hair is curly/wavy and very fine also.

My research has been online.  My hair is curly.  I think that you need to do research on curly hair specialists in your new area, even though your hair is wavy, because curly/wavy hair needs a much different treatment than straight hair.

I have been driving for an hour to my appointments, and expect that I will need to continue this, only in another direction. 

I think that you need to go and talk to someone and perhaps get a shampoo or something minor at a salon before you get something major done, like a haircut. 

In my youth I encountered too many beauticians who decided that they were *artists*, and should have carte blanche with my hair.  Don't put up with any nonsense like that from anyone. 

When I change hairdressers I will be watching everything very closely.  The moment that anything is cut from my head that seems excessive the appointment will be over.

You might check the Devachan websites for someone with training in your hair type in your new area.  Another possibility is Ouidad, but I don't know exactly what that company might offer.

Asking others is super advice, also.  A few years back when I thought that I might have to change salons I did that, and the women that I asked were helpful and very flattered.

bopper

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2012, 09:17:27 AM »
Ask your current hairdresser how to ask a new hairdresser if they can cut it (what terms would they use) and how to tell the new hairdresser what you want.

Yvaine

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2012, 09:24:06 AM »
When you get out there, look for someone with hair like yours and ask where they go. I've been doing that lately since my hairdresser can't cut hair anymore, and even total strangers have been very receptive and helpful.

This is really good advice. When I wanted a drastic cut some years back, I went to a friend who had similar hair to mine (and always looked great) and asked her who she went to, and got not just a salon name but a stylist name. It was the best haircut I've ever had. I haven't kept going back--it's a bit out of my usual price range and I'm going long right now anyway--but I looked fantastic there for a while.

QueenofAllThings

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #5 on: February 16, 2012, 06:18:08 PM »
And remember that consults are usually free! If a new hairdresser doesn't spend time with you, looking at your (dry) hair and discussing what you want BEFORE the shampoo etc - get up and leave.

RandomAngel

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2012, 10:00:24 AM »
Ask your current hairdresser how to ask a new hairdresser if they can cut it (what terms would they use) and how to tell the new hairdresser what you want.

This is a great idea!

I'd also suggest staying rigidly on-message.

"ALL of our stylists are great with that!"
"Oh, so there's no one you'd recommend for my hair type, specifically?"

"Um, let me just book you an appointment with ____."
"Oh, does ____ specialize in my type of hair?"

You'll probably get a lot more evasiveness before you're done, but hang in there!

felix

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2012, 10:38:37 AM »
My hair is wavy and my daughter's is curly.  I started going to my hair dresser because he is a curly hair specialist.  He is amazing.  There is a website that helps you find salons who have someone who specializes in curly hair.  These also have reviews.  Try this www.naturallycurly.com  There is a tab for Salon Finder.  Good luck.

heathert

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2012, 10:48:22 AM »
Thanks everyone, that really does help!  ;D

Sirius

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #9 on: February 17, 2012, 11:12:05 AM »
My hair is very similar to yours, and I actually had a beautician tell me that I "shouldn't expect a decent cut with my hair."  I stopped going there and started going to a place close to where I live; this shop is manned by two cousins, and they both do an excellent job on my hair.  I told the first cousin who cut my hair about what the original beautician had said, and she said, "That's just an excuse to do a bad job."  Mr. Sirius still patronizes the original shop, but he sees someone who is very good with beards.

Aquamarine

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Re: S/O of S/O Ask the waiter
« Reply #10 on: February 17, 2012, 12:45:40 PM »
I have never had a bad experience going to an Aveda salon, going to different ones for 30 years now.  I would start there and use the terms your hairdresser tells you to use.
Always be polite, even to nasty people. Not because they are nice, but because you are.