Author Topic: Phrases/sayings you hate  (Read 82689 times)

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poundcake

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Re: Phrases/sayings you hate
« Reply #1575 on: December 15, 2014, 06:17:19 AM »
I overheard someone say "It is what it is" a half-dozen times in an argument, and remembered again how irritating and pointless that phrase is.

atirial

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Re: Phrases/sayings you hate
« Reply #1576 on: December 17, 2014, 04:58:31 AM »
"[Deity] does not give you more then you can handle" Heard it the first time after a friend's death and I kept wanting to ask whether that included terminal conditions. Most of the time I've encountered it it has been used as an excuse by the speaker not to help - after all, if events are no more than the person can handle then they don't need any assistance.

As a result, I absolutely loathe the phrase. It's right up there with "Smile!"

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Phrases/sayings you hate
« Reply #1577 on: December 17, 2014, 05:04:30 AM »
"[Deity] does not give you more then you can handle" Heard it the first time after a friend's death and I kept wanting to ask whether that included terminal conditions. Most of the time I've encountered it it has been used as an excuse by the speaker not to help - after all, if events are no more than the person can handle then they don't need any assistance.

As a result, I absolutely loathe the phrase. It's right up there with "Smile!"

"[Deity] helps those that help themselves."  So, infants can go suck a lemon?
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Smulkin

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Re: Phrases/sayings you hate
« Reply #1578 on: December 17, 2014, 08:26:24 AM »
'Going forward'.
 It sounds so awkwardly artificial. Disjointed and fake-sounding and doing odd things with tense.
 It adds nothing- there's a clutch of existing phrases (in future, from now on, henceforth), so the lexicon was not impoverished before it. It seems to have glommed onto the speech of many people, arriving suddenly- which would make sense if is indeed a borrowing from business daftspeak- and spawning like a lot of horrible little identikit mushrooms.

ladyknight1

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Re: Phrases/sayings you hate
« Reply #1579 on: December 17, 2014, 08:26:43 AM »
"[Deity] does not give you more then you can handle" Heard it the first time after a friend's death and I kept wanting to ask whether that included terminal conditions. Most of the time I've encountered it it has been used as an excuse by the speaker not to help - after all, if events are no more than the person can handle then they don't need any assistance.

As a result, I absolutely loathe the phrase. It's right up there with "Smile!"

"[Deity] helps those that help themselves."  So, infants can go suck a lemon?

Yeah. I have had to tell my mom that she should find the scriptural basis for that statement when she said it in a uncharitable way. It isn't in there, I've looked.

daen

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Re: Phrases/sayings you hate
« Reply #1580 on: December 18, 2014, 11:34:52 AM »
"[Deity] does not give you more then you can handle" Heard it the first time after a friend's death and I kept wanting to ask whether that included terminal conditions. Most of the time I've encountered it it has been used as an excuse by the speaker not to help - after all, if events are no more than the person can handle then they don't need any assistance.

As a result, I absolutely loathe the phrase. It's right up there with "Smile!"

"[Deity] helps those that help themselves."  So, infants can go suck a lemon?

Yeah. I have had to tell my mom that she should find the scriptural basis for that statement when she said it in a uncharitable way. It isn't in there, I've looked.

And I thought it was Shakespeare, but apparently its origin is Ancient Greece, and that phrasing of the sentiment is from Poor Richard's Almanack.  I have no issues with any of the above sources, but I don't really consider them canonical.  :)