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  • February 26, 2017, 08:59:21 AM

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Author Topic: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22  (Read 1915 times)

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PastryGoddess

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #30 on: January 26, 2017, 10:28:10 PM »
For a company magazine, the cover art wouldn't matter to me at all, with or without an explanation.  Unless there was a blurb on the cover that was of interest to me, the magazine would probably be going directly in the recycle bin.  Maybe your magazine has more useful stuff in it than the ones I have experience with.  :-\

I think that OP is an in house designer for a company/association.  So the clientele would be internal rather than the average consumer. 

Please correct me if I'm wrong OP

And?  The consulting company I used to work for sent in-house magazines to its employees monthly.  Hardly any of the content was of interest to me.

I'm sorry Harriet Jones, I thought I was responding to Ellen S...not your post. 
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Twik

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #31 on: January 27, 2017, 10:16:55 AM »
Actually, I quite like hearing about the creative process. This doesn't sound like "the gooey tarlike substance on the top left is indicative of the bifurcated dualism of western metamedia conversations about capitalism and existentialism" as an explanation. It's "how I chose to put the cover together to have an effect on the reader and make them want to pick it up."
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Onyx_TKD

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #32 on: January 27, 2017, 04:28:22 PM »
Actually, I quite like hearing about the creative process. This doesn't sound like "the gooey tarlike substance on the top left is indicative of the bifurcated dualism of western metamedia conversations about capitalism and existentialism" as an explanation. It's "how I chose to put the cover together to have an effect on the reader and make them want to pick it up."

But for choosing the cover art that will make a reader want to pick it up (which seems like the relevant goal for a magazine cover), then shouldn't the choice be made based solely on the cover? A behind-the-scenes explanation,  however interesting it may be, can play no role in helping to grab the reader's attention, since the reader won't see it (or won't read it until after picking up the magazine, even if the blurb is included). An explanation/discussion of the artistic choices might be very valuable in terms of guiding future designs, but doesn't seem relevant to choosing the best existing design unless the design is just a concept that will be reworked/improved before publication.

jpcher

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #33 on: January 27, 2017, 04:43:57 PM »
For a company magazine, the cover art wouldn't matter to me at all, with or without an explanation.  Unless there was a blurb on the cover that was of interest to me, the magazine would probably be going directly in the recycle bin.  Maybe your magazine has more useful stuff in it than the ones I have experience with:-\

I think that OP is an in house designer for a company/association.  So the clientele would be internal rather than the average consumer. 

Please correct me if I'm wrong OP

And?  The consulting company I used to work for sent in-house magazines to its employees monthly.  Hardly any of the content was of interest to me.

PastryGoddess -- You are correct. It is an internal magazine, sometimes used as a give-away to certain customers due to certain content that month.

Harriet Jones -- (to the bold) I certainly hope so! I'd hate to see all our hard work ending up in the trash! Our magazine features different departments and explains technical things in layman's terms. It includes company events (like Engineers Week, TEAACH, STEM, Leadership conferences, etc.) with lots of employee photos. There's monthly sections about community involvement and outstanding achievements along with human interest stories. It's a good mix of what our business does and what our people do inside/outside the company. We have won many external awards for both the writing and design.

The magazine is distributed via racks placed around the buildings. People can take an issue or not, their choice. The racks are pretty much close to empty before the next issue hits the stands. I think that's a good indication that people enjoy the magazine.



Op, your update makes the question a bit different for me. (I wanted to post earlier, but hadn't gotten a chance.)

(snip -- but I appreciate your thoughts here and apologize to everyone if the update is vastly different from the OP.)

is there any metric of feedback by which you can go back and reevaluate how Sally's covers (or all of them) are actually working? Sales figures, or a focus group of customers/readers that can give feedback on them?


LOL! Metrics and feedback is Sally's forte. She's a research fanatic! When the team was talking about including a snippet about the cover Sally piped up and said that her husband (who works for the company) said that his co-workers LOVE the idea. A bit one-sided to me and not official research ::). I didn't say anything because I didn't know what to say or how to put it so that it didn't sound, I dunno, negative?

Honestly? I don't think the cover has a lot to do with how many people pick up the magazine. I think that people read it for the content, no matter what's on the cover. We (Sally's spearhead) are in the process of getting a survey together in order to see how effective our magazine is and this would be a great question "Does what's on the cover make you choose to pick up a copy" or something like that.



I like your thinking Onyx_TKD (you posted while I was typing)

eta: Onyx, after re-reading your post, can I use your exact words to in order to argue my point? You very eloquently put my thoughts into words, which is something that I am unable to do. Thank you.
« Last Edit: January 27, 2017, 05:42:05 PM by jpcher »

Onyx_TKD

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #34 on: January 27, 2017, 05:47:46 PM »
I like your thinking Onyx_TKD (you posted while I was typing)

eta: Onyx, after re-reading your post, can I use your exact words to in order to argue my point?

Certainly, if you want to. I'm flattered!

Honestly? I don't think the cover has a lot to do with how many people pick up the magazine. I think that people read it for the content, no matter what's on the cover. We (Sally's spearhead) are in the process of getting a survey together in order to see how effective our magazine is and this would be a great question "Does what's on the cover make you choose to pick up a copy" or something like that.

When I read your update, it struck me as a bit odd that the cover article is chosen based on who submits the best artwork, and it seems even odder if you don't think that the cover art is a major draw for readers. Is there a reason for that setup? It seems like choosing a central article based on the artwork is likely to result in it either being written by the best artist, who may not be the best writer or have the best topic, or the cover art being done by the person with the best pitch, who may not have the best artwork (as seems to be your current concern). If this process isn't completely set in stone, you might want to think about whether there is an alternative system that might work better to ensure that good stories and good artwork from all the artists/writers get featured.

jpcher

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #35 on: January 27, 2017, 06:04:30 PM »
I like your thinking Onyx_TKD (you posted while I was typing)

eta: Onyx, after re-reading your post, can I use your exact words to in order to argue my point?

Certainly, if you want to. I'm flattered!

Honestly? I don't think the cover has a lot to do with how many people pick up the magazine. I think that people read it for the content, no matter what's on the cover. We (Sally's spearhead) are in the process of getting a survey together in order to see how effective our magazine is and this would be a great question "Does what's on the cover make you choose to pick up a copy" or something like that.

When I read your update, it struck me as a bit odd that the cover article is chosen based on who submits the best artwork, and it seems even odder if you don't think that the cover art is a major draw for readers. Is there a reason for that setup? It seems like choosing a central article based on the artwork is likely to result in it either being written by the best artist, who may not be the best writer or have the best topic, or the cover art being done by the person with the best pitch, who may not have the best artwork (as seems to be your current concern). If this process isn't completely set in stone, you might want to think about whether there is an alternative system that might work better to ensure that good stories and good artwork from all the artists/writers get featured.

The cover is based on the already chosen/written story. The editors/writers pick the topic and we artists base our cover on the already written words. We have a preliminary written story and we design our covers from there along with thoughts from editors and our own research of the topic.

Oh, and thank you for your words! :D
« Last Edit: January 27, 2017, 06:06:15 PM by jpcher »

Sirius

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #36 on: January 27, 2017, 06:05:46 PM »
I like paintings, and if a painting has to be explained I probably won't like it.  My favorite artist is Claude Monet.

sammycat

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #37 on: January 27, 2017, 06:19:25 PM »
Honestly? I don't think the cover has a lot to do with how many people pick up the magazine. I think that people read it for the content, no matter what's on the cover. We (Sally's spearhead) are in the process of getting a survey together in order to see how effective our magazine is and this would be a great question "Does what's on the cover make you choose to pick up a copy" or something like that.

Pod.  There are a few community and local business magazines that I like to read regularly. I pick them up regardless of the cover as I'm interested in what's inside than what's on the front.  TBH, I couldn't even tell you what's on the cover most of the time.  All I know is, that's it's (day of the week) and the latest issue of X is out today so I must remember to pick up a copy when I'm at the shops/wherever.

Bijou

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #38 on: January 29, 2017, 06:35:00 PM »
What the artist was thinking doesn't matter.  Either I respond to it or not.  If I were taking an art appreciation class it may be different as the art is to be discussed and analyzed .  For my own self, however, either I like it or I don't.
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shhh its me

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Re: Curious questions about art . . . OP#22
« Reply #39 on: January 29, 2017, 06:51:02 PM »
I have a client who has been a gallery owner and art professor.  "Art is in the eye of the beholder what does it say to you , that;s the beauty  of art it speaks to you individually."

I have a client who is an artist who told me the story behind much of her art . most of her work is about one life event.   Her work is much more literal then I thought.   But talking to her lead me to understand her work better although I still see what I saw the first time.

So either or is fine ; If it makes the experience better read up.  If you enjoy art for the "wrong reason" doesn't matter the art said what it said to you.


WolfWay

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Re: Curious questions about art
« Reply #40 on: January 30, 2017, 02:14:59 AM »
Having spent over two decades working as a librarian in an art museum I may have something to offer here.

In a way, art is like a joke.  If you get the point of the joke or you understand what the artist intends to portray, you 'get it' and appreciate it immediately. 

If you don't understand what the artist is aiming for, you can be taught to appreciate the work of art or understand the joke.  You will learn why people enjoy the object but you will not get the initial 'jolt' that immediate recognition provides.

Not understanding a work of art is no disgrace.  It simply means that your perception is different  than that of the artist.   
Talking of arts and jokes, I've always loved one piece of modern art I saw that was a snowshovel bolted to the wall, entitled "Prelude to a broken arm". :)
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