Author Topic: Corned Beef . . .  (Read 1524 times)

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jpcher

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Corned Beef . . .
« on: March 17, 2012, 05:02:28 PM »
Not necessarily a recipe request, I always do my corned beef in the crock pot. But if you have other ways to cook corned beef, I'd appreciate a recipe. ;D

I'm more interested in the different cuts of beef. I tend to buy the cheapest, what's on sale.

This year I bought the "Point Cut Brisket" on sale for $1.99/pound.

There were 2 other choices at $3.99/pound and $6.99/pound. (I don't remember the type of cut they were.)

I know the cheaper cut is fattier. But in a crock-pot it is tender and delicious. I skim off the fat before adding potatoes and cabbage.

If I bought the $6.99/pound beef would there be a major difference in taste? Would you need to cook it differently? Would putting this cut of beef in the crock-pot  somehow insult it's flavor? Is this the type of cut that should be roasted? (I've never roasted corned beef . . . is that yummy?)




Just wondering if getting out of my rut of buying the cheapest would be worth the extra cost.




(edited to correct spelling.)
« Last Edit: March 17, 2012, 05:06:54 PM by jpcher »

Ginger G

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2012, 10:49:33 AM »
I actually prefer roasting corned beef in the oven to cooking it in liquid, I think it brings out the taste a little more and I like the packet of spices sprinkled on top.  I roast it for 20 minutes per pound at 375 degrees.   However, my significant other has a major obsession with corned beef and thinks his way of cooking it is the ONLY way.  He insists it has to be cooked in a pot on the stove (no slow cooker) with a couple of beers and some water for the liquid.   We actually had a big fight about this subject recently.  Very silly actually but we were both insisting our way was the right way.

Frog24

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #2 on: June 06, 2012, 01:48:23 PM »
I think both of you are terribly cruel for making my mouth water for corned beef without posting your recipes.   ;D

Thipu1

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2012, 10:28:33 AM »
I actually prefer roasting corned beef in the oven to cooking it in liquid, I think it brings out the taste a little more and I like the packet of spices sprinkled on top.  I roast it for 20 minutes per pound at 375 degrees.   However, my significant other has a major obsession with corned beef and thinks his way of cooking it is the ONLY way.  He insists it has to be cooked in a pot on the stove (no slow cooker) with a couple of beers and some water for the liquid.   We actually had a big fight about this subject recently.  Very silly actually but we were both insisting our way was the right way.

My mother used to boil the corned beef but once she found a recipe for roasting the meat and tried it, She always roasted the corned beef.  It was wonderful. 

The meat was tender and flavorful.  Because the recipe specified adding wedges of cabbage to the roasting pan, the vegetable was also colorful and tasty instead of looking and tasting like old laundry.  She also roasted potatoes instead of boiling them. 

Dang, now I want corned beef but we're having sausage and pepper sandwiches for Dinner. 

 

mechtilde

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2012, 02:20:26 PM »
It would depend on what the actual cut of meat was. A more expensive cut might be better roasted, for example.
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Instantkarma

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2012, 02:39:05 PM »
I actually prefer roasting corned beef in the oven to cooking it in liquid, I think it brings out the taste a little more and I like the packet of spices sprinkled on top.  I roast it for 20 minutes per pound at 375 degrees.   However, my significant other has a major obsession with corned beef and thinks his way of cooking it is the ONLY way.  He insists it has to be cooked in a pot on the stove (no slow cooker) with a couple of beers and some water for the liquid.   We actually had a big fight about this subject recently.  Very silly actually but we were both insisting our way was the right way.

My mother used to boil the corned beef but once she found a recipe for roasting the meat and tried it, She always roasted the corned beef.  It was wonderful. 

The meat was tender and flavorful.  Because the recipe specified adding wedges of cabbage to the roasting pan, the vegetable was also colorful and tasty instead of looking and tasting like old laundry.  She also roasted potatoes instead of boiling them. 

Dang, now I want corned beef but we're having sausage and pepper sandwiches for Dinner. 

 

Oh that's brilliant! I love corned beef but hate mushy cabbage. I'll have to try this out!

jpcher

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2012, 06:03:14 PM »
Thanks for bringing this back up, Ginger G.  ;D

I never even thought of roasting a corned beef, I'm betting that's what the more expensive cut would be really good for.

Now that I've got myself a brandy-new roaster, I think I'm going to have to try it this way. The roasted potatoes and cabbage sound wonderful!


Oh that's brilliant! I love corned beef but hate mushy cabbage. I'll have to try this out!

If you ever do it in a crock-pot or stove top again ;) add the cabbage during the last 15 minutes or so of cooking. The cabbage just needs to wilt a bit. Mushy cabbage = yuck!

I'm wondering with the roasting . . . do you put the cabbage in the same time you put the meat in?

penelope2017

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2012, 06:08:08 PM »
I always buy the best cut of corned beef, and steam it over beer and a tablespoon or two of sugar in the oven, tin foil over it. I can't wrap my head around the fatty corned beef. Years of my family boiling fatty corned beef made me hate it, until I tried it this way.

It is the best recipe I've ever used and it get raves whenever I make it.

I also find slicing it thin and serving it resting simmered beer is great for sandwiches.

Hillia

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2012, 06:17:57 PM »
I made a corned beef in my pressure cooker this year, and it was incredibly tasty. 

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Hmmmmm

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2012, 06:18:20 PM »
I actually prefer roasting corned beef in the oven to cooking it in liquid, I think it brings out the taste a little more and I like the packet of spices sprinkled on top.  I roast it for 20 minutes per pound at 375 degrees.   However, my significant other has a major obsession with corned beef and thinks his way of cooking it is the ONLY way.  He insists it has to be cooked in a pot on the stove (no slow cooker) with a couple of beers and some water for the liquid.   We actually had a big fight about this subject recently.  Very silly actually but we were both insisting our way was the right way.

My mother used to boil the corned beef but once she found a recipe for roasting the meat and tried it, She always roasted the corned beef.  It was wonderful. 

The meat was tender and flavorful.  Because the recipe specified adding wedges of cabbage to the roasting pan, the vegetable was also colorful and tasty instead of looking and tasting like old laundry.  She also roasted potatoes instead of boiling them. 

Dang, now I want corned beef but we're having sausage and pepper sandwiches for Dinner. 

 

I do similar to your mom.  I found a method in a 1930's cookbook.  You gently simmer in beer for 10 min per pound.  Then put a glaze on, wrap in foil and then then put a couple of bricks or a heavy cast iron skillet on top and roast fo another 10min per pound.  Then remove the foil, add a little more glaze on top, and cook for another 10 or so minutes just to the glaze.  Rest for 15 min before slicing.  The compression by the brick creates a wonderful texture. 

We roast our potatoes but put the cabbage in the pot we used for simmering the corned beef.  I'll have to try roasting the cabbage next time.

Some of our favorite glazes are stone ground mustard and brown sugar or mustard and asian plum sauce with a little brown sugar.

Our next adventure with corned beef is to smoke one.  I think I'll simmer it for a while, then but a glaze on and put on the smoker. 

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: Corned Beef . . .
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2012, 03:00:48 PM »
I made a corned beef in my pressure cooker this year, and it was incredibly tasty.

I second this.  It was so much faster and more flavorful doing it in a pressure cooker rather than just boiling it.  I never tried roasting it - need to try that next time.