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Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye

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CakeBeret:
I just avoid saying it :)

If I were to say it, I would say foy-yay.

Teenyweeny:

--- Quote from: Thipu1 on March 28, 2012, 10:48:59 AM ---But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

--- End quote ---

I think someone's been pulling your leg there. We say 'buff-ay' in the UK too.

MrsJWine:
I'm from the US, born in South Dakota. Until we moved to Wisconsin, I'd only ever heard "foyer." Then again, South Dakotans pronounce the capital (Pierre) as "peer." Now I hear a mix of both "foyer" and "foyay." Both now sound wrong to me, even though they're both in the dictionary; I just avoid using the word altogether.

cabbageweevil:

--- Quote from: Thipu1 on March 28, 2012, 10:48:59 AM ---NYC here and we would say foy-er. 

I've noticed that people in the UK tend to use the pronunciation of a term's original language. 

Some years ago we were on a ship.  The theater was named after Vincent Van Gogh.  Here, the name is usually pronounced Van Go.  When making announcements about the day's schedule, the English Social Director always referred to the place as the Van Khok Lounge.  There were people who had a hard time finding the place for a day or two.

But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

Ah, the glories of the English language.

--- End quote ---

"It's always a problem to know --
  Is the chap called Van Gokh, or Van Go?
  This doubt re the name,
  I confess, to my shame,
  Makes my highbrows go terribly low."

And just to add to the confusion -- I (lifelong Brit) call the self-serve jobbie, a BUFF-ay. (Teenyweeny -- just noticed your post -- but which syllable do you put the accent on?)
 

Teenyweeny:

--- Quote from: cabbageweevil on March 28, 2012, 11:07:08 AM ---
--- Quote from: Thipu1 on March 28, 2012, 10:48:59 AM ---NYC here and we would say foy-er. 

I've noticed that people in the UK tend to use the pronunciation of a term's original language. 

Some years ago we were on a ship.  The theater was named after Vincent Van Gogh.  Here, the name is usually pronounced Van Go.  When making announcements about the day's schedule, the English Social Director always referred to the place as the Van Khok Lounge.  There were people who had a hard time finding the place for a day or two.

But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

Ah, the glories of the English language.

--- End quote ---

"It's always a problem to know --
  Is the chap called Van Gokh, or Van Go?
  This doubt re the name,
  I confess, to my shame,
  Makes my highbrows go terribly low."

And just to add to the confusion -- I (lifelong Brit) call the self-serve jobbie, a BUFF-ay. (Teenyweeny -- just noticed your post -- but which syllable do you put the accent on?)

--- End quote ---

I would probably give both syllables equal stress. I think we can both agree, though, that it isn't a 'buffette'. (Although, I do sometimes say that as a little joke. I also enjoy saying 'ballette'.  ;D )

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