Author Topic: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye  (Read 22567 times)

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Ceallach

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Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« on: March 28, 2012, 06:36:40 AM »
I've heard a character on a US show say "foy-aye" before and assumed it was meant to be funny (e.g. a joke),  but I just heard it on another show and wondered if this is simply a regional difference in pronunciation that goes beyond accents.

Here, the entryway type area of a home (foyer) is called "foy-er".    Or perhaps "foy-ah".  What I've heard on these shows that sounds completely different is definitely more "foy-aye" or "foy-yay".  Very different.

So how do you pronounce Foyer, AKA the entryway.  Or if you've never heard that word before, tell us!
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Teenyweeny

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2012, 06:43:16 AM »
I wouldn't usually say foyer (I'd be more likely to say 'hall' or 'entrance'), but if I did, I'd say foy-yay. I'm in the UK, if that helps.



Irishkitty

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2012, 06:55:11 AM »
I wouldn't usually say foyer (I'd be more likely to say 'hall' or 'entrance'), but if I did, I'd say foy-yay. I'm in the UK, if that helps.
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blue2000

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2012, 09:43:57 AM »
I would say foy-yay (Canada). Although it is mostly fancy houses and businesses that have foyers here. If you live in a regular house, you just have an entrance/front hall.
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Thipu1

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2012, 10:48:59 AM »
NYC here and we would say foy-er. 

I've noticed that people in the UK tend to use the pronunciation of a term's original language. 

Some years ago we were on a ship.  The theater was named after Vincent Van Gogh.  Here, the name is usually pronounced Van Go.  When making announcements about the day's schedule, the English Social Director always referred to the place as the Van Khok Lounge.  There were people who had a hard time finding the place for a day or two.

But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

Ah, the glories of the English language. 
« Last Edit: March 28, 2012, 10:53:54 AM by Thipu1 »

CakeBeret

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2012, 10:50:52 AM »
I just avoid saying it :)

If I were to say it, I would say foy-yay.
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Teenyweeny

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2012, 10:59:12 AM »
But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

I think someone's been pulling your leg there. We say 'buff-ay' in the UK too.



MrsJWine

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2012, 11:01:09 AM »
I'm from the US, born in South Dakota. Until we moved to Wisconsin, I'd only ever heard "foyer." Then again, South Dakotans pronounce the capital (Pierre) as "peer." Now I hear a mix of both "foyer" and "foyay." Both now sound wrong to me, even though they're both in the dictionary; I just avoid using the word altogether.


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cabbageweevil

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2012, 11:07:08 AM »
NYC here and we would say foy-er. 

I've noticed that people in the UK tend to use the pronunciation of a term's original language. 

Some years ago we were on a ship.  The theater was named after Vincent Van Gogh.  Here, the name is usually pronounced Van Go.  When making announcements about the day's schedule, the English Social Director always referred to the place as the Van Khok Lounge.  There were people who had a hard time finding the place for a day or two.

But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

Ah, the glories of the English language.

"It's always a problem to know --
  Is the chap called Van Gokh, or Van Go?
  This doubt re the name,
  I confess, to my shame,
  Makes my highbrows go terribly low."

And just to add to the confusion -- I (lifelong Brit) call the self-serve jobbie, a BUFF-ay. (Teenyweeny -- just noticed your post -- but which syllable do you put the accent on?)
 

Teenyweeny

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2012, 11:11:46 AM »
NYC here and we would say foy-er. 

I've noticed that people in the UK tend to use the pronunciation of a term's original language. 

Some years ago we were on a ship.  The theater was named after Vincent Van Gogh.  Here, the name is usually pronounced Van Go.  When making announcements about the day's schedule, the English Social Director always referred to the place as the Van Khok Lounge.  There were people who had a hard time finding the place for a day or two.

But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 

Ah, the glories of the English language.

"It's always a problem to know --
  Is the chap called Van Gokh, or Van Go?
  This doubt re the name,
  I confess, to my shame,
  Makes my highbrows go terribly low."

And just to add to the confusion -- I (lifelong Brit) call the self-serve jobbie, a BUFF-ay. (Teenyweeny -- just noticed your post -- but which syllable do you put the accent on?)

I would probably give both syllables equal stress. I think we can both agree, though, that it isn't a 'buffette'. (Although, I do sometimes say that as a little joke. I also enjoy saying 'ballette'.  ;D )



Thipu1

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2012, 11:18:17 AM »
People like to have fun with words. 

Most people would call a platter of raw vegetables served with dip 'Croo-da-TAYS'. A friend, who knows better, enjoys calling them 'CRUDD-ites'.  He also likes to call hors oeuvres 'Horse Doovers'. 

Gumbysqueak

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2012, 11:23:19 AM »
foy-yay for our house. When you enter there is a large space with foy-yay table with flowers. Foy-er is also common in Colorado/USA. If you enter a traditional post WII house we call it an entry room.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2012, 11:33:36 AM »


But then, when referring to a self-serve display of food in a restaurant, most People in the US would call it a 'Buff-AY' while those in rhe UK would call it a 'BUFFette' 


Quote
And just to add to the confusion -- I (lifelong Brit) call the self-serve jobbie, a BUFF-ay. (Teenyweeny -- just noticed your post -- but which syllable do you put the accent on?)

Quote
I would probably give both syllables equal stress. I think we can both agree, though, that it isn't a 'buffette'. (Although, I do sometimes say that as a little joke. I also enjoy saying 'ballette'.  ;D )

A "buffette", whatever else, it sure isn't. Confusion English / French: in our island's own language, we have the word in its own right, "buffet" (accent on first syllable) -- to hit someone, with considerably-less-than-lethal violence.  Then along came the Frogs -- same word, same spelling, totally different meaning.  And please, let us not get into the business with the world's most famous arachnophobe...

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2012, 11:49:11 AM »
I'm Canadian.  I say foy-eh.   ;D  (So foy-yay)
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Re: Foyer / Foy-yay / Foy-er / Foy-ah / For-aye
« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2012, 02:02:43 PM »
NYC here.  We say "foy-er" unless we are being goofy, then its a foy-ay (like Tar-zhay for Target, or on-deeve for endive (N-dive)).

People like to have fun with words. 

Most people would call a platter of raw vegetables served with dip 'Croo-da-TAYS'. A friend, who knows better, enjoys calling them 'CRUDD-ites'.  He also likes to call hors oeuvres 'Horse Doovers'.

I call them hoors doovers ala Homer Simpson  ;D