Author Topic: Secrets from a Baker  (Read 26751 times)

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Zilla

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #60 on: April 17, 2012, 08:38:30 PM »
I am so appreciative of these suggestions, and am looking forward to trying them *all*!

wheeitsme, I will much appreciate that recipe.

Zilla, I love you.  I had not heard of lemon juice powder.  I googled.  King Arthur makes some, and I use and love many of their products.

NyaChan, as much as I lurv lemon curd, I thank you for suggesting I use it to good effect beyond occasional toast.  And the idea of a thicker flavored syrup, too.

Cakeberet, ooh, cream cheese icing in combo with a cake which has lemon juice and peel.  Sighing with happiness at the thought.

Thank you!
I also forgot they carry this in most grocery stores in the US. (if you are here)


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Isometric

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #61 on: April 17, 2012, 08:41:25 PM »
You need to use 1 tsp of Xantham gum plus a tsp of liquid for each cup of substituted GF flour.  I also find that cake recipes with a lot of natural moisture, like carrot cake, fare better than dryer cakes.

I've made my chocolate chip cookies with GF flour.  You couldn't tell they were GF.

I can't help with the eggs, though.

Thanks Outdoor Girl  :)

PastryGoddess

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #62 on: April 17, 2012, 09:27:13 PM »
You need to use 1 tsp of Xantham gum plus a tsp of liquid for each cup of substituted GF flour.  I also find that cake recipes with a lot of natural moisture, like carrot cake, fare better than dryer cakes.

I've made my chocolate chip cookies with GF flour.  You couldn't tell they were GF.

I can't help with the eggs, though.

Not an expert on gluten free, but I POD to what Outdoor Girl has said
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PastryGoddess

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #63 on: April 17, 2012, 09:36:03 PM »
Hi Pastry Goddess,

Thanks for making me hungry!

Some allergy related baking questions...

Any tips on working with gluten free flour? It seems to crumble and fall apart. This is following any normal recipe but substituting normal flour for GF.

What can I use instead of egg in a cake recipe? I use eggs as little as possible because they kind of freak me out! (weird, I know)

Thanks  :D

Here are some egg substitutes
Silken Tofu: 1/4 cup per egg.  Blend it in a mixer or food processor first to make it absolutely smooth
Applesauce & baking powder: 1/4 cup of applesauce and 1 tsp baking powder per egg
Yogurt: 1/4 cup per egg
Buttermilk: 1/2 cup per egg
Vegetable oil: 1/4 cup per egg
Bananas: 1/2 banana per egg
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EmmaJ.

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #64 on: April 17, 2012, 09:49:55 PM »
What can I use instead of egg in a cake recipe? I use eggs as little as possible because they kind of freak me out! (weird, I know)

Thanks  :D

Have you tried an egg substitute?  I use Egg Beaters.  It comes as a perfectly homogenized liquid in a carton - it's almost like pouring a cup of milk.


Isometric

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #65 on: April 17, 2012, 09:52:13 PM »
Hi Pastry Goddess,

Thanks for making me hungry!

Some allergy related baking questions...

Any tips on working with gluten free flour? It seems to crumble and fall apart. This is following any normal recipe but substituting normal flour for GF.

What can I use instead of egg in a cake recipe? I use eggs as little as possible because they kind of freak me out! (weird, I know)

Thanks  :D

Here are some egg substitutes
Silken Tofu: 1/4 cup per egg.  Blend it in a mixer or food processor first to make it absolutely smooth
Applesauce & baking powder: 1/4 cup of applesauce and 1 tsp baking powder per egg
Yogurt: 1/4 cup per egg
Buttermilk: 1/2 cup per egg
Vegetable oil: 1/4 cup per egg
Bananas: 1/2 banana per egg

Thank you PastryGoddess! :) :)

Isometric

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #66 on: April 17, 2012, 09:53:59 PM »
What can I use instead of egg in a cake recipe? I use eggs as little as possible because they kind of freak me out! (weird, I know)

Thanks  :D

Have you tried an egg substitute?  I use Egg Beaters.  It comes as a perfectly homogenized liquid in a carton - it's almost like pouring a cup of milk.

Thanks for the suggestion! We don't have Egg Beaters where I live, I've tried a powdered substitute with some fritters, it worked ok but but great!

wheeitsme

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #67 on: April 18, 2012, 12:04:40 AM »
Here it is.  The most moist, lemony cake I have ever had.  And one of my favorite desserts ever.

http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=115366.0

Dindrane

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #68 on: April 18, 2012, 12:09:27 AM »
My question:

Is there a way to get softer, fluffier biscuits or rolls out of whole wheat flour, without adding white flour? I've tried using vital wheat gluten and it helps a bit, but I just cannot get that perfectly soft fluffiness without using 1/2 white and 1/2 wheat flour.

One product that I really love, if you can find it at your grocery store, is King Arthur Flour White Whole Wheat.  I use it in place of all-purpose white flour.  I think KAF recommends subbing half the regular all-purpose flour with the white whole wheat, but I don't ever have regular all-purpose.  I haven't done any really stringent comparisons, but I don't find that using all white whole wheat impacts my recipes in a particularly noticeable way, and it has almost as much fiber/nutrients as regular whole wheat flour does.

So you might try using that to make biscuits, and see how it does.

Also, speaking of bread products, the very best recipe for white bread (which I used to make rolls when I tried it out for Thanksgiving) also came from my King Arthur Flour Baking Companion cookbook.  It had more ingredients than any bread recipe I've ever used, but it was so worth it.  I had to go on a bit of a hunt for potato flour (which I did manage to find at one of my usual grocery stores), but I'm convinced that that and the small amount of butter were what made the bread so utterly fantastic.

Since I grew up making bread from the Tassajara Bread Book and using only the whole-grainiest of whole grains, white bread (even made with white whole wheat flour) always feels rather decadent to me.  There are definite benefits to slow-rising whole grain bread, but sometimes you just want some delicious and fluffy white bread.


PastryGoddess

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #69 on: April 18, 2012, 10:03:10 AM »
My question:

Is there a way to get softer, fluffier biscuits or rolls out of whole wheat flour, without adding white flour? I've tried using vital wheat gluten and it helps a bit, but I just cannot get that perfectly soft fluffiness without using 1/2 white and 1/2 wheat flour.

One product that I really love, if you can find it at your grocery store, is King Arthur Flour White Whole Wheat.  I use it in place of all-purpose white flour.  I think KAF recommends subbing half the regular all-purpose flour with the white whole wheat, but I don't ever have regular all-purpose.  I haven't done any really stringent comparisons, but I don't find that using all white whole wheat impacts my recipes in a particularly noticeable way, and it has almost as much fiber/nutrients as regular whole wheat flour does.

So you might try using that to make biscuits, and see how it does.

Also, speaking of bread products, the very best recipe for white bread (which I used to make rolls when I tried it out for Thanksgiving) also came from my King Arthur Flour Baking Companion cookbook.  It had more ingredients than any bread recipe I've ever used, but it was so worth it.  I had to go on a bit of a hunt for potato flour (which I did manage to find at one of my usual grocery stores), but I'm convinced that that and the small amount of butter were what made the bread so utterly fantastic.

Since I grew up making bread from the Tassajara Bread Book and using only the whole-grainiest of whole grains, white bread (even made with white whole wheat flour) always feels rather decadent to me.  There are definite benefits to slow-rising whole grain bread, but sometimes you just want some delicious and fluffy white bread.

If you can't find potato flour for some reason, instant potato flakes will do in a pinch
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Dindrane

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #70 on: April 18, 2012, 10:38:47 AM »
The recipe itself mentioned that you could substitute potato flakes, but I didn't really want to unless I had to.  Fortunately, the quasi-health food grocery store sells small packages of all kinds of different flours.  The recipe doesn't use much potato flour, so a small package of it was all I needed.


CakeBeret

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #71 on: April 18, 2012, 11:18:35 AM »
My question:

Is there a way to get softer, fluffier biscuits or rolls out of whole wheat flour, without adding white flour? I've tried using vital wheat gluten and it helps a bit, but I just cannot get that perfectly soft fluffiness without using 1/2 white and 1/2 wheat flour.

One product that I really love, if you can find it at your grocery store, is King Arthur Flour White Whole Wheat.  I use it in place of all-purpose white flour.  I think KAF recommends subbing half the regular all-purpose flour with the white whole wheat, but I don't ever have regular all-purpose.  I haven't done any really stringent comparisons, but I don't find that using all white whole wheat impacts my recipes in a particularly noticeable way, and it has almost as much fiber/nutrients as regular whole wheat flour does.

I've heard of using white whole wheat, but I've been less than eager to try it because it's bleached, plus it's way more expensive. I might give it a shot though.
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CuriousParty

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #72 on: April 18, 2012, 11:42:18 AM »
Cake Beret, I believe the King Arthur Flour referenced is not bleached..

Yup - looked it up - unbleached - http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/king-arthur-white-whole-wheat-flour-5-lb

KAF is often more expensive than the store brands, but I have found in my baking that it is worth the cost.

CuriousParty

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #73 on: April 18, 2012, 11:42:39 AM »
Here it is.  The most moist, lemony cake I have ever had.  And one of my favorite desserts ever.

http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=115366.0
Woot!

Thank you!

CakeBeret

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #74 on: April 18, 2012, 11:53:42 AM »
Cake Beret, I believe the King Arthur Flour referenced is not bleached..

Yup - looked it up - unbleached - http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/king-arthur-white-whole-wheat-flour-5-lb

KAF is often more expensive than the store brands, but I have found in my baking that it is worth the cost.

Ooh. Neat. I'll have to see if I can find that. I pay about $1/lb for organic whole wheat now, so I'd love it if I could find the white wheat comparably priced.
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