Author Topic: Secrets from a Baker  (Read 28051 times)

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SoCalVal

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #75 on: April 22, 2012, 01:55:03 AM »
Cake Beret, I believe the King Arthur Flour referenced is not bleached..

Yup - looked it up - unbleached - http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/king-arthur-white-whole-wheat-flour-5-lb

KAF is often more expensive than the store brands, but I have found in my baking that it is worth the cost.

Yeah, I recall my instructor last year in pastry class telling us that there is now grown white wheat that is used for making white whole wheat flour.



oz diva

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #76 on: April 22, 2012, 07:37:30 AM »
What can I use instead of egg in a cake recipe? I use eggs as little as possible because they kind of freak me out! (weird, I know)

Thanks  :D
You can use baking powder  oops,  bicarb of soda and vinegar. The resulting chemical reaction causes the rise. Here's a recipe http://allrecipes.com.au/recipe/4534/egg-free-chocolate-cake.aspx

I baked bread yesterday and it was very yummy. Now I am attempting to make a sour dough mother.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2012, 12:35:23 AM by oz diva »

Victoria

Zilla

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #77 on: April 22, 2012, 07:42:54 AM »
Anyone have a source for AP flour and Bread Flour? 


For various reasons we have been making our own breads for all our needs.  And I would like to find a source for the flour.  I can get great prices on whole wheat and any of the specialty stuff.


I would like to buy them in 25 or 50 pounds bags if possible.  Any idea where to start looking?  I am in the Southeast part of the US.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #78 on: April 23, 2012, 12:08:05 AM »
You may want to try Sysco if you have one there or just contact King Arthur directly and see if they'll sell you the 50 pound bags.  Also try googling wholesale flour + your state

CakeBeret

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #79 on: April 23, 2012, 10:27:52 AM »
I just wanted to thank this thread. :D

I found the white whole wheat flour and I could actually get the off-brand for $.50/lb. Over the weekend I made a loaf of bread and a batch of rolls using part whole wheat and part white whole wheat flour. They are DELICIOUS. Very soft and fluffy and slightly chewy. Just like the taste/texture you would get from using part wheat and part white flour.

Also I got an itch to make a key lime cake. I don't particularly like key lime or cake, but it sounded like a fun cake to make. I used 4 limes, and boiled the lime rinds and excess pulp into a simple syrup to brush the layers with. I made it into 3 layers and used cream cheese frosting on it. It looks pretty fantastic. We're going to take it over to the in-laws tonight, so I haven't tasted it yet, but I've been admiring it on my counter.
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Frog24

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #80 on: July 19, 2012, 03:13:26 PM »
What can I use instead of egg in a cake recipe? I use eggs as little as possible because they kind of freak me out! (weird, I know)

Thanks  :D

I found a recipe online (not taking credit for this bit of genius in ANY way) where the chef made an egg substitute out of flax.  Here's a single batch, but it's easy to up the quantities.

25g whole flax seed
250 ml water

put flax seeds in water and bring to boil.
simmer for 30 minutes
strain out the flax seeds using a sieve and discard them

the resulting goo is the egg substitute.  let it cool to room temperature and it's ready to go.

The only thing that wasn't provided was how much to use per egg.  The original recipe said to freeze the excess in ice cube trays. 1 ice cube = 1 egg.  But there wasn't anything in the recipe that said "1tbsp (or 2... or 3) of this goo = 1 egg".

Still, it worked like a charm.  The egg-free, dairy-free, gluten-free cupcakes I made were a hit, and rose as though they had eggs in them.

Frog

PastryGoddess

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #81 on: July 19, 2012, 05:46:23 PM »
What can I use instead of egg in a cake recipe? I use eggs as little as possible because they kind of freak me out! (weird, I know)

Thanks  :D

I found a recipe online (not taking credit for this bit of genius in ANY way) where the chef made an egg substitute out of flax.  Here's a single batch, but it's easy to up the quantities.

25g whole flax seed
250 ml water

put flax seeds in water and bring to boil.
simmer for 30 minutes
strain out the flax seeds using a sieve and discard them

the resulting goo is the egg substitute.  let it cool to room temperature and it's ready to go.

The only thing that wasn't provided was how much to use per egg.  The original recipe said to freeze the excess in ice cube trays. 1 ice cube = 1 egg.  But there wasn't anything in the recipe that said "1tbsp (or 2... or 3) of this goo = 1 egg".

Still, it worked like a charm.  The egg-free, dairy-free, gluten-free cupcakes I made were a hit, and rose as though they had eggs in them.

Frog

This is really great and you can find flax seed at the grocery store these days.

White Lotus

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #82 on: September 05, 2012, 07:26:08 PM »
In response to Isometric's question:  For a good non-egg egg substitute in baking, try En-r-g Egg Replacer.  I love the stuff.  Gives a great result in baked goods.  Someone else on another thread doesn't care for it -- it seems to kind of creep her out as eggs do you and egg derived egg substitutes do me, or maybe she notices a difference in result that I don't.  So YMMV.  There are various home-made versions involving flax seed but I haven't used them since I found Egg Replacer and can't remember them any more, but I bet the Internet can. <g>

jayhawk

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #83 on: May 31, 2013, 04:12:35 PM »
I just now read this thread and have been enjoying it, so thought I'd throw this out there.  I agree that King Arthur Flour is AWESOME, but if you're ever traveling through Kansas, look for Hudson Cream flour.  I use it because it's local and, hey, Kansas is the Wheat State afterall!

Here's some information:  http://www.hudsoncream.com/  I usually use their unbleached white and whole wheat.

whatsanenigma

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #84 on: May 31, 2013, 04:58:22 PM »
I know this thread isn't brand new, but it's been a very interesting read!

Now, I know rice crispie treats aren't exactly "baked", but they are a dessert so maybe someone reading this thread will know the answer I am looking for.  I follow the recipe on the back of the box exactly and I swear, you could break a tooth on the ones I make.  They end up like cement.

Ordinarily I am a decent cook and baker but rice crispie treats baffle me, for some unknown reason.

Also, chocolate chip cookies do strange things when I try to make them.  I have tried several different recipes and the final cookie product always seems to melt into a puddle and be really thin, not a cookie-like texture at all.  Anybody know why that might be happening? Thanks!

magicdomino

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #85 on: May 31, 2013, 05:16:49 PM »
I know this thread isn't brand new, but it's been a very interesting read!

Now, I know rice crispie treats aren't exactly "baked", but they are a dessert so maybe someone reading this thread will know the answer I am looking for.  I follow the recipe on the back of the box exactly and I swear, you could break a tooth on the ones I make.  They end up like cement.Ordinarily I am a decent cook and baker but rice crispie treats baffle me, for some unknown reason.

Also, chocolate chip cookies do strange things when I try to make them.  I have tried several different recipes and the final cookie product always seems to melt into a puddle and be really thin, not a cookie-like texture at all.  Anybody know why that might be happening? Thanks!

My guess is that the marshmallow is getting too hot and cooking to a harder candy stage.  I have an electric stove, and find that if I turn off the heat just as the marshmallows start to melt, there is enough residual heat to finish melting.

Library Dragon

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #86 on: May 31, 2013, 05:30:45 PM »
I'm looking for a recommendation for a brotform.  (For those unfamiliar with them, it's a basket used to proof bread.)

I've seen the nice ones, but my mind rebels at spending over $30 for a rattan basket. 

I'll even try one of the plastic ones if anyone has a brand they like.

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hyzenthlay

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #87 on: May 31, 2013, 07:03:23 PM »
According to my bread bible 'The Bread Baker's Apprentice' the cheap wicker baskets do just as good a job and are about 2 bucks a piece at Cost Plus World Imports.  There are professional bakeries that use them :)

They don't feel as nice, but they do what needs to be done.

You can also proof in a stainless steel bowl if you have a large smooth cloth you can line it with.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #88 on: May 31, 2013, 07:19:13 PM »
I know this thread isn't brand new, but it's been a very interesting read!

Now, I know rice crispie treats aren't exactly "baked", but they are a dessert so maybe someone reading this thread will know the answer I am looking for.  I follow the recipe on the back of the box exactly and I swear, you could break a tooth on the ones I make.  They end up like cement.

Ordinarily I am a decent cook and baker but rice crispie treats baffle me, for some unknown reason.

Also, chocolate chip cookies do strange things when I try to make them.  I have tried several different recipes and the final cookie product always seems to melt into a puddle and be really thin, not a cookie-like texture at all.  Anybody know why that might be happening? Thanks!
No advice on the Rice Krispie treats.

On the cookies, try reducing the oven temp by 10 degrees or chilling your dough first.

What type of fat are you using? I'm thinking it might be high in water.

Library Dragon

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Re: Secrets from a Baker
« Reply #89 on: May 31, 2013, 11:12:47 PM »
According to my bread bible 'The Bread Baker's Apprentice' the cheap wicker baskets do just as good a job and are about 2 bucks a piece at Cost Plus World Imports.  There are professional bakeries that use them :)

They don't feel as nice, but they do what needs to be done.

You can also proof in a stainless steel bowl if you have a large smooth cloth you can line it with.

Thank you. I'll check it out.  I didn't know I could proof in stainless steel.

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