Author Topic: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions  (Read 2583 times)

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cabbagegirl28

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #45 on: April 11, 2014, 11:53:32 AM »
The version I was taught of Pop Goes the Weasel is:

All around the cobbler's bench
The monkey chased the weasel.
The preacher kissed the cobbler's wife.
Pop! goes the weasel.

Yeah, great for the kids.


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emwithme

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #46 on: April 11, 2014, 03:51:59 PM »
Nobody's mentioned the little piggies!

Bare-footed child, starting with the big toe:

This little piggy went to market,
this little piggy stayed at home.
This little piggy had roast beef
and this little piggy had none.
And this little piggy cried 'wee wee wee' all the way home! (as you tickle up the child's leg to their tummy)

The piggies and the teddy bear can keep a little one busy for ages.

I actually used this in my teens when I had broken two toes doing gymnastics (I was Very Disappointed with a vault I did and kicked the vaulting horse).  My whole foot started swelling during the rest of the practice, to the point that I couldn't get dressed afterwards, so my mum took me to A&E to get it checked out.  I told the doctors that I had kicked the vaulting horse and the corner went between "home" and "roast beef". 

Bethczar

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #47 on: April 11, 2014, 09:11:25 PM »
East coast US

All around the mulberry bush
The monkey chased the weasel
The monkey thought it was all in fun
Then pop goes the weasel
That's how I learned it in Wisconsin, too.

GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #48 on: April 11, 2014, 09:29:38 PM »
Criss cross apple sauce (trace lines in a X up and down the back)
Spider climbing up your back (walk your fingers up the spine) - every kid wriggles as you get up near the neck)
Cool breeze (blow in their ear)
Tight squeeze (Hug the kid)
Now you've got the giggles (tickle them)

I like to leave a gap between the 2nd last and last lines to enhance the 'terror'. 😝

We had an extra line for that and different actions

Criss cross apple sauce (trace lines in a X up and down the back)
Spider climbing up your back (walk your fingers up the spine)
Tight squeeze (Squeeze their shoulders)
Light breeze (blow on the back of their neck)
Bang an egg on your head and let it dribble down your back (mimics mushing an egg into someones hair and raking your fingers down their back)
Now you've got the shivers (tickle them)

For us it was:
Cross, cross, line line (trace crosses and lines on the back)
Spider crawling up your spine (scurry fingers up the spine)
Cool breeze (blow on the back of the neck)
Tight squeeze (squeeze the back of the neck with your fingers, not hard!)
Now you've got the shiveries!

Also, where I grew up (Alberta, Canada) we sing,

All around the mulberry bush
The monkey chased the weasel
The monkey thought it was all in fun,
Pop! Goes the weasel!

And I grew up singing:
Ring around the rosey
A pocket full of posies.
Hush-a! Hush-a!
We all fall down!

I have never heard of these clip-clopping, galloping, trit-trotting horses though.  That's not a rhyme I'm familiar with.
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jmarvellous

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #49 on: April 11, 2014, 11:05:53 PM »
East coast US

All around the mulberry bush
The monkey chased the weasel
The monkey thought it was all in fun
Then pop goes the weasel

That's the version we know!
I don't know the lady trotting one or the teddy bear one people have been citing, at all. And my mother (Michigan) was big on nursery rhymes/songs.

We did the spiders on the back thing, but only amongst my preteen friends at slumber parties. I don't remember the base form, as we were always trying to add more and more absurd things to spook each other.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #50 on: April 13, 2014, 03:52:34 PM »
The version I was taught of Pop Goes the Weasel is:

All around the cobbler's bench
The monkey chased the weasel.
The preacher kissed the cobbler's wife.
Pop! goes the weasel.

Yeah, great for the kids.

An interesting crossover with a verse of Robert Burns's ballad "My Love She's But A Lassie Yet" (metaphor for new whisky, needing to be left alone for a fair stretch of time to mature and improve in quality):

"We're a' dry wi' the drinking o't,
 We're a' dry wi' the drinking o't;
 The minister kissed the fiddler's wife,
 And couldnae preach for thinking o't."

katycoo

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #51 on: April 14, 2014, 01:15:46 AM »
Australia here.
<snip>
The other one I've discovered that is different to most people's versions is Pop goes the weasel. The one my family always said is:

Round and round the mulberry bush
The monkey chased the weasel
The monkey stopped to pull up his socks
Pop, goes the weasel.

I suspect that it was just my family that did it that way, though.

Mine was

Round and round the mulberry bush
The monkey chased the weasel
The monkey thought it was a joke
Pop, goes the weasel.

Another Aussie.

Ring a rosey is same as cakeeater.

Can't remember the third line of pop goes the weasel now I've seen that version, darn it. Remember there were other verses. Something about tuppeny something. Aargh! Will probably wake up at 3am and remember exactly.  :)

The one I've now seen goes:

Half a pound of tuppeny rice
Half a pound of treacle
Stir it up and make it nice
Pop, goes the weasel

Half a pound of  tuppenny rice,
Half a pound of treacle
That's the way the money goes
Pop! Goes the weasel.

I knew the next bit as

Penny for a spool of thread
Penny for a needle
That's the way the money goes
Pop! Goes the weasel.

Cricket

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #52 on: May 01, 2014, 05:06:56 AM »
Criss cross apple sauce (trace lines in a X up and down the back)
Spider climbing up your back (walk your fingers up the spine) - every kid wriggles as you get up near the neck)
Cool breeze (blow in their ear)
Tight squeeze (Hug the kid)
Now you've got the giggles (tickle them)

I like to leave a gap between the 2nd last and last lines to enhance the 'terror'. 😝

Wow, my version is very different:

Going on a treasure hunt, forgot to mark the spot (drawing a big infinity symbol over and over on their back)
Dit dot dit dot (drumming back with fingertips - I don't really know what this line means: maybe digging in different places for the treasure?)
Spider crawling up your back (walk fingers up spine to neck)
Bites you on the neck (pinch neck ... not too hard :) )
Blood runs up (Lightly run fingers upwards over their head)
Blood runs down (same as ^ but downwards)
Cool breeze (blow on neck)
Tight squeeze (squeeze neck)
Now you've got the goosebumps!

Kids usually get the shivers and then goosebumps on their arms. And want you to do it over and over and over and ...



Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #53 on: May 01, 2014, 06:15:46 AM »
Australia here.
<snip>
The other one I've discovered that is different to most people's versions is Pop goes the weasel. The one my family always said is:

Round and round the mulberry bush
The monkey chased the weasel
The monkey stopped to pull up his socks
Pop, goes the weasel.

I suspect that it was just my family that did it that way, though.

Mine was

Round and round the mulberry bush
The monkey chased the weasel
The monkey thought it was a joke
Pop, goes the weasel.

Another Aussie.

Ring a rosey is same as cakeeater.

Can't remember the third line of pop goes the weasel now I've seen that version, darn it. Remember there were other verses. Something about tuppeny something. Aargh! Will probably wake up at 3am and remember exactly.  :)

The one I've now seen goes:

Half a pound of tuppeny rice
Half a pound of treacle
Stir it up and make it nice
Pop, goes the weasel

Half a pound of  tuppenny rice,
Half a pound of treacle
That's the way the money goes
Pop! Goes the weasel.

I knew the next bit as

Penny for a spool of thread
Penny for a needle
That's the way the money goes
Pop! Goes the weasel.

Up and down the City Road
In and out the Eagle
That's the way the money goes
Pop! goes the weasel.

That at least makes sense if there's a pub called the Eagle on City Road.

As a child I had a book - the title and author are long gone from my memory - with a character who was a weasel called Popghose.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #54 on: May 02, 2014, 07:14:05 AM »


Can't remember the third line of pop goes the weasel now I've seen that version, darn it. Remember there were other verses. Something about tuppeny something. Aargh! Will probably wake up at 3am and remember exactly.  :)

The one I've now seen goes:

Half a pound of tuppeny rice
Half a pound of treacle
Stir it up and make it nice
Pop, goes the weasel

Half a pound of  tuppenny rice,
Half a pound of treacle
That's the way the money goes
Pop! Goes the weasel.

I knew the next bit as

Penny for a spool of thread
Penny for a needle
That's the way the money goes
Pop! Goes the weasel.

Up and down the City Road
In and out the Eagle
That's the way the money goes
Pop! goes the weasel.

That at least makes sense if there's a pub called the Eagle on City Road.

As a child I had a book - the title and author are long gone from my memory - with a character who was a weasel called Popghose.

I may have messed up the quote tree a bit -- anyway: Wiki says that no-one is sure what (if anything) the bit about the weasel going pop, actually means; but one of the better-liked explanations, is that it refers to London artisans in bygone days, pawning ("popping") the tools of their trade (known in their slang, as "weasels"), to buy the necessities of life, and / or strong drink.  Hatters, tailors, and furriers are among the "weasel" owners, suggested.  There is indeed a pub called the Eagle in City Road, London; which bears on its wall, a plaque with the rhyme, and the "pawning" explanation of it.  I'd heard, as of long ago, this interpretation of the ditty -- with hatters named as the tradesmen concerned.

I once saw a splendid cartoon, showing an old-fashioned grocers' shop; inside, assorted characters -- some human, some clothed-and-talking animals, a la Beatrix Potter. No. 3  I think, in the queue for the counter, is a weasel.  The customer being served is saying to the proprietor, per cartoon speech-bubble: "Half a pound of tuppenny rice and half a pound of treacle, please." The caption underneath is: "Weasel didn't like the sound of this."

PaintingPastelPrincess

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #55 on: May 03, 2014, 09:48:36 PM »
We did:

Riding a little pony all downtown
Whoops! (Dip the baby to the side) Little baby, don't fall down!

cabbageweevil

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Re: Nursery Rhymes - regional versions
« Reply #56 on: May 04, 2014, 04:42:19 PM »
Just come to mind, re the "meme" referring to "tuppenny rice": this is an expression with which English folk-verse might appear to be mildly obsessed.

A long-time English "thing", concerning England's south-western peninsula (the West Country): by popular repute, a backward and extremely rural part of the kingdom, populated by unsophisticated rustics speaking in broad-bordering-on-incomprehensible dialect.  Fun has long been had with genuine, or fabricated, West-Country folk-songs -- often nonsensical to non-West-Country folk, or nonsensical, full stop. (Also -- popular pirate-speech: "Aaaar !  Me 'earties !", etc. -- a disproportionate number of pirates supposedly came from the English West Country, hence pirates traditionally talking in West-Country dialect.)

Anyway -- part of a comic mock-folk-song from those parts (not meant to make much sense);


'Alf a pound of tupp'ny rice
Makes a lovely clagger.
Boil it up and make it nice --
Gor, [rude word] Jagger.
Oh, 'ow 'appy us'll be
When us gets to the West Country,
Where the oggies* grow on trees --
Gor, [rude word] Jagger.

* "oggy", or "tiddy-oggy": alternative term for Cornish Pasty (West Country delicacy involving meat, potato, onion and turnip, baked in a sort of hump-form pastry casing).