Author Topic: Is this rude or standard? Etiquette from a cashier's point of view....  (Read 9920 times)

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sparksals

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I concur not rude by the customer. How on earth would they know that they aren't supposed to put their purchased on the counter for the staff member to process?   

I would look at solutions to make the work less difficult, such as a stool to alleviate the height issue or similar.   I really don't think there's much you can say.  Even if you could, that would influence that customer only, not those who follow, so you'd still run into the same issue. Plus you risk offending the ones you do tell and driving away business - not a good strategy as an employee!  I sympathize, but not a lot you can do here.


The same way they know to unload their cart contents onto the conveyor belt?

Not analogous. When items are in a cart, the cashier can't reach the items at all. Putting a basket on the counter right in front of a cashier gives them easy access to the items.


The problem is, many of us who have worked as cashiers, including the OP say it is NOT easy access.  It may seem easy for you, but it isn't on the other side of the coin.


camlan

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The problem is, many of us who have worked as cashiers, including the OP say it is NOT easy access.  It may seem easy for you, but it isn't on the other side of the coin.

I think the disconnect comes from those of us who have not worked as cashiers in a situation where the baskets are in use.

It simply would never had occurred to me that lifting things out of a basket would cause problems for the cashier. Now that I've read this thread, I can see that it might. But it was simply not on my radar before.

And when you have a cart full of stuff, it's clear when you need to unload it on a conveyor belt or counter--so that the cashier can reach the items. It's not as clear that you need to unload a basket.

I always do when there's a conveyor belt, or room to unload things as the customer ahead of me is finishing up, but more because it helps to speed the transaction along than an awareness that the cashier might like me to do so. There are some stores where the setup of the line of waiting customers and the counter and cash register setup do not signal "unload the basket." If that's what's expected of customers, then there needs to be clear signs spelling that out, or a setup that clearly indicates that's what's supposed to happen.

I can't see calling people rude because they expect a cashier to empty the basket. Clueless, yes. Rude, no.

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Judah

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The problem is, many of us who have worked as cashiers, including the OP say it is NOT easy access.  It may seem easy for you, but it isn't on the other side of the coin.

I think the disconnect comes from those of us who have not worked as cashiers in a situation where the baskets are in use.

It simply would never had occurred to me that lifting things out of a basket would cause problems for the cashier. Now that I've read this thread, I can see that it might. But it was simply not on my radar before.

And when you have a cart full of stuff, it's clear when you need to unload it on a conveyor belt or counter--so that the cashier can reach the items. It's not as clear that you need to unload a basket.

I always do when there's a conveyor belt, or room to unload things as the customer ahead of me is finishing up, but more because it helps to speed the transaction along than an awareness that the cashier might like me to do so. There are some stores where the setup of the line of waiting customers and the counter and cash register setup do not signal "unload the basket." If that's what's expected of customers, then there needs to be clear signs spelling that out, or a setup that clearly indicates that's what's supposed to happen.

I can't see calling people rude because they expect a cashier to empty the basket. Clueless, yes. Rude, no.

I don't even think it's clueless. I've worked as a cashier and never found it a problem to reach into the basket.
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artk2002

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I like the way Trader Joe's handles it. There's no room at the checkout for you to unload, but they have a low shelf where the cashier puts your basket to unload it. The shelf fits underneath the basket of a cart if you're using a cart, so the cashier has an easy job of unloading that one, too. That also prevents those annoying people who start unloading on the belt before you're finished.
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Syrse

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I don't even think it's clueless. I've worked as a cashier and never found it a problem to reach into the basket.

As a fellow cashier, it really depends on the level of the basket and the height of the cashier. Sometimes customers put a box on top of another box and expect me to load the groceries in there. Fellow cashiers who are two heads bigger than me don't mind doing this, so I can understand how it might confuse the customers. But once I ask politely to put the box somewhere else because I cannot lift upwards, it's no problem.
Lots of stores, lots of different systems. I still vote for a polite explanation and request. Nine customers out of ten are not going to mind.

Cami

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If I see a place to put my basket, I unload it. If I don't see a place to put my basket, I don't unload it.

lowspark

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Well, someone has to unload the basket - whether it is the cashier or the customer. So, being somewhat short myself (5'3") I gotta figure that if the counter is at a height which would make unloading difficult for the cashier, it's almost certainly going to be difficult for me too.

I very seldom use a basket (I almost always just use a cart on wheels) but when I do, and when I see other people do, I don't remember seeing them unload it. They (and I) just plop it down on the counter or conveyer belt. And in drug stores (IME), as others have noted, there isn't room on that small counter for both the basket and the unloaded items so am I supposed to continue holding the basket while unloading it onto the counter? I'm not gonna do that.

I think the problem here lies with the design of the cashier station. It's not done right and it's causing the cashier undue stress. And that issue is between the cashier and the employer. As the custumer, it's really not my concern if the store has designed the cashier station badly unless it affects me. And the only way it's going to affect me is if I'm required to unload my purchases from the basket and if there's potential for me to hurt myself in so doing.

I think we do tend to see things others do as rude when it affects us in a negative manner as in this case, even though it's really not rude at all. It seems to me that just based on how many people responded to this thread with opposing habits of unloading vs not, there really is no accepted SOP for these hand-held baskets. So I don't think these people are rude. I think it's a case of - some people do it one way, some do it the other.

The real issue is the set up and that is something the OP has to work with the store management/ownder to resolve.