Author Topic: stupid questions on official forms  (Read 8337 times)

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hobish

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #30 on: June 06, 2012, 11:09:48 AM »

I almost forgot about the release forms for skydiving. They covered every possible scenario. I think i agreed that if they tied a brick to my ankles and threw me out of the plane shuteless that was A-Ok and neither i or anyone acting on my behalf could sue.
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scotcat60

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #31 on: June 27, 2012, 06:05:34 PM »
The nurse ding the checklist for  my Mum before an operation siad "I think the answer to Question 5 is "No"  Question 5 was "are you, or do you think you might be pregnant". My Mum was 83. Asked if she had ever used recreational drugs, she said no, and later told me "I said no, but what is a recreational drug anyway?" I said she had anwered correctly.

I was asked on a survey "On a scale of 1-10, how tired do you expect to be by the end of your radiotherapy treatment?" I wrote, "I have no idea"

Sirius

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #32 on: June 30, 2012, 04:21:18 PM »
I've stopped filling out the questionnaire at our pediatricians' office at our wellness visits. 

I understand where they're coming from with carseats and firearms and sugary drink intake, but it's just too much.  For example, the domestic safety question includes asking if anyone in your family has ever been yelled at.  At (mumbledy-mumble) years old, of course DH and I have been yelled at in our lives.

I like this one from our citizenship application:
*  Have you ever been a habitual drunkard?

A friend's citizenship application asked, "Were you involved in **long spiel about Nazi activities during WWII**?  He answered "no."  The next question was, "Are you sure?"  Since my friend was in his early 20s and the year was 1981 or so I think he could state with a pretty high degree of certainty that he wasn't involved.  Since he was a Dutch citizen born in Belgium the form might have been tailored to that, but I don't know for sure.   

Sirius

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #33 on: July 13, 2012, 01:54:33 AM »
Got another one.

This one arrived today:  "The following information on the listed individual is required:  Great Aunt (GA) who is deceased."  GA passed away in 1996, and I sent in a copy of GA's death certificate when I originally submitted the paperwork for survivors' benefits for my aunt who passed away in April 2012 (Aunt P).  Apparently there's either a procedure they have to go through or no one bothered to look at the copy of the death certificate. 

Back to the form:  The information on GA that is requested is for things like address, phone number, etc. which are things I can't provide.  I have to admit I toyed with the idea of giving her present address as the cemetery where she's buried, but Mr. Sirius advised against it. (Not that he didn't think it was hilarious, he just thought that it would be counterproductive.  He's right.)  There's also a section that states, "If you are unable to provide the requested information please write in the space below the name and complete address of someone who is able to supply the information and return this page to us."  Really, no one else in the family has more information than I do. 

Mr. Sirius suggested that what might happen is that the authority might insist that the survivors' benefits be paid to GA's estate.  However, I have a copy of GA's will, and she left her estate to Aunt P.  So we're right back where we started from.  I told him to keep his ideas to himself, but I'll be very surprised if he isn't right. 


hermanne

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #34 on: July 24, 2012, 02:06:29 PM »
Not a question on a form, but the form itself...

I signed DD and myself up for a family campout that's being held on our town's ball fields. Kids under 18 have to camp with a parent or guardian.

So I signed us up on-line, and got an email with med forms for both of us. I read through it; this was the same form the town sends to their day campers who were dropped off, basically giving the camp counsellors permission to seek emergency medical attention if the parent couldn't be contacted. I'm thinking "What?! I'm going to be right there with her! I'm required to be right there with her!"

What makes it more fun is that they sent the exact same form for me even though I listed myself as an adult during sign-up. ::)  Maybe I can fax it to my mom. ;)
« Last Edit: July 24, 2012, 02:09:47 PM by hermanne »
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rashea

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #35 on: July 24, 2012, 02:23:11 PM »
Does it ever bother you that official forms so often contain questions where you cannot possibly truthfully answer no, and yet you still know that a yes will get you in trouble.

Like the visa form I just filled out that had the following question:

"Have you been in a country that has infectious deceases within the last 30 days?"

Well unless you've spent the last 30 days on Antarctica how can you say no to that one.

Sorry, I'm laughing at the typo.
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lady_disdain

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #36 on: July 24, 2012, 02:58:15 PM »
Not a question on a form, but the form itself...

I signed DD and myself up for a family campout that's being held on our town's ball fields. Kids under 18 have to camp with a parent or guardian.

So I signed us up on-line, and got an email with med forms for both of us. I read through it; this was the same form the town sends to their day campers who were dropped off, basically giving the camp counsellors permission to seek emergency medical attention if the parent couldn't be contacted. I'm thinking "What?! I'm going to be right there with her! I'm required to be right there with her!"

What makes it more fun is that they sent the exact same form for me even though I listed myself as an adult during sign-up. ::)  Maybe I can fax it to my mom. ;)

If the camp is large or has many simultaneous activities, it makes sense (for you daughter, not you :)). She could get hurt while you were in some other part of the camp and need an ambulance, for example. Being able to request help immediately may save precious minutes, instead of having to wait around until you could arrive. In some situations, even 10 minutes can make a difference.

hermanne

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #37 on: July 24, 2012, 04:16:41 PM »
Not a question on a form, but the form itself...

I signed DD and myself up for a family campout that's being held on our town's ball fields. Kids under 18 have to camp with a parent or guardian.

So I signed us up on-line, and got an email with med forms for both of us. I read through it; this was the same form the town sends to their day campers who were dropped off, basically giving the camp counsellors permission to seek emergency medical attention if the parent couldn't be contacted. I'm thinking "What?! I'm going to be right there with her! I'm required to be right there with her!"

What makes it more fun is that they sent the exact same form for me even though I listed myself as an adult during sign-up. ::)  Maybe I can fax it to my mom. ;)

If the camp is large or has many simultaneous activities, it makes sense (for you daughter, not you :)). She could get hurt while you were in some other part of the camp and need an ambulance, for example. Being able to request help immediately may save precious minutes, instead of having to wait around until you could arrive. In some situations, even 10 minutes can make a difference.

The camp is for one night and in a small open field next to a playground we frequent, and the only way I couldn't help her is if I was incapacitated as well. (Great, now I'm paranoid something's going to happen. ;))

But I am somewhat amused that I was auto-sent the same form.
« Last Edit: July 24, 2012, 04:18:48 PM by hermanne »
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lady_disdain

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #38 on: July 24, 2012, 04:22:16 PM »
I don't want to feed your paranoia. I am sure nothing bad will happen. It is not like a meteor could fall on the camp site, causing a mass extinction on Earth. >:D

Moray

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Re: stupid questions on official forms
« Reply #39 on: July 24, 2012, 04:25:02 PM »
Not a question on a form, but the form itself...

I signed DD and myself up for a family campout that's being held on our town's ball fields. Kids under 18 have to camp with a parent or guardian.

So I signed us up on-line, and got an email with med forms for both of us. I read through it; this was the same form the town sends to their day campers who were dropped off, basically giving the camp counsellors permission to seek emergency medical attention if the parent couldn't be contacted. I'm thinking "What?! I'm going to be right there with her! I'm required to be right there with her!"

What makes it more fun is that they sent the exact same form for me even though I listed myself as an adult during sign-up. ::)  Maybe I can fax it to my mom. ;)

If the camp is large or has many simultaneous activities, it makes sense (for you daughter, not you :)). She could get hurt while you were in some other part of the camp and need an ambulance, for example. Being able to request help immediately may save precious minutes, instead of having to wait around until you could arrive. In some situations, even 10 minutes can make a difference.

The camp is for one night and in a small open field next to a playground we frequent, and the only way I couldn't help her is if I was incapacitated as well. (Great, now I'm paranoid something's going to happen. ;))

But I am somewhat amused that I was auto-sent the same form.

And if something happens to either of you they will have the appropriate information re: allergies, emergency contacts, etc. They aren't asking you to fill it out because they think something will happen, but to protect themselves from liability and to ensure you get appropriate care if something does happen.

What if you become incapacitated? They're going to want to know that you're allergic to bees or whathaveyou, and they're also protecting themselves from a lawsuit if they want to hand you a Benadryl while acting as camp employees. We live in a litigious society, so I can't blame them for covering themselves.
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