The Good Things in Life > Random acts of kindness and grace

story from the past

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doodlemor:
A line in a song about a cow going dry reminded me of something my grandmother told me that happened around the year 1900, and about the kindness of a neighbor.

My grandma was born on a small farm in rural Pennsylvania in 1891, on what could be called a subsistence farm.  She had 5 living brothers and sisters.  Food was not plentiful there - she told me how she and her siblings upset her mother by snatching half grown vegetables out of the garden to eat because they were always hungry. [My great-grandmother was afraid that all of the vegetables would be gone before they were big enough to harvest.]

Grandma told me that all of the children got the measles at the same time, and that they were very ill indeed.  They were hungry, and the cow had gone dry.  A poor, older, widowed woman who lived in a hut in the woods nearby had a cow which was still fresh.  Every day after she milked that cow she walked down to my grandma's home with a bucket of milk for the sick children.  This milk was all that they could digest for awhile.  I don't think that she expected any reward or recognition, she just was concerned for the family.  The widow likely shorted her own food intake for the sake of my grandma and her siblings.  All of those children lived to be adults, too.

How wonderful to think of such extraordinary kindness!  So, do any of you ehellions have stories to share of generousness and kindness in days gone by?



snowdragon:
No story to share but that made me go all misty.

doodlemor:
I get pretty misty too, snowdragon. 

It must have been so hard to be on an isolated farm with a bunch of sick kids.  Sometimes we forget how much easier life is today.

Jones:
My MIL is into ancestry. She called me up recently, crying because she was discovering how many children her ancestral relatives lost in infancy/young childhood. I managed to cheer her up eventually with a crack about how she had a 100% success rate because she had one child and he made it to adult hood. Then I hung up the phone and held my kiddies a little tighter.

I don't know if it's a random act of kindness, per se, but family lore talks about DH's grandmother, who as a child was dying of some fever. Her parents had been kind to the Indians on the reservation about 30 miles away, and when he heard, the medicine man came to help her. He went to the backyard and "picked some flowers", made teas of some and burnt others. DH's grandmother is now into her 90s, and one of the few people of her generation in this area from whom I've never heard a racist comment.

Sensei Otousan:

--- Quote from: Jones on June 12, 2012, 05:15:37 PM ---My MIL is into ancestry. She called me up recently, crying because she was discovering how many children her ancestral relatives lost in infancy/young childhood. I managed to cheer her up eventually with a crack about how she had a 100% success rate because she had one child and he made it to adult hood. Then I hung up the phone and held my kiddies a little tighter.

I don't know if it's a random act of kindness, per se, but family lore talks about DH's grandmother, who as a child was dying of some fever. Her parents had been kind to the Indians on the reservation about 30 miles away, and when he heard, the medicine man came to help her. He went to the backyard and "picked some flowers", made teas of some and burnt others. DH's grandmother is now into her 90s, and one of the few people of her generation in this area from whom I've never heard a racist comment.

--- End quote ---


That is a truly touching story....sniff.. :'(

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