The Good Things in Life > Random acts of kindness and grace

story from the past

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doodlemor:

--- Quote from: Jones on June 12, 2012, 05:15:37 PM ---My MIL is into ancestry. She called me up recently, crying because she was discovering how many children her ancestral relatives lost in infancy/young childhood. I managed to cheer her up eventually with a crack about how she had a 100% success rate because she had one child and he made it to adult hood. Then I hung up the phone and held my kiddies a little tighter.

I don't know if it's a random act of kindness, per se, but family lore talks about DH's grandmother, who as a child was dying of some fever. Her parents had been kind to the Indians on the reservation about 30 miles away, and when he heard, the medicine man came to help her. He went to the backyard and "picked some flowers", made teas of some and burnt others. DH's grandmother is now into her 90s, and one of the few people of her generation in this area from whom I've never heard a racist comment.

--- End quote ---

Wow!  What a wonderful story!

I bet that the teas did a lot of good.  I've been drinking rose hip tea lately, and have more energy.  It's too bad that so few people know which herbs are medicinal any more.

Jones:
Yeah; my husband drinks a lot of tea from herbs we grow, things like raspberry leaf, peppermint and ginger. I don't care for them but I will drink them when I feel the need and they do work. DH has been teaching himself about the local plants, but he still couldn't do what the medicine man did; so much knowledge has been lost in a relatively short time.

HungryHungryKitties:
Mine is not so much re-telling a story, as it is speculation.

In the genealogy research I have been doing, I found out that my great-great-grandparents moved with their two young daughters ages 2 and 3 from South Carolina to Mississippi in the late 1860's.  The 3-yo was my great-grandmother (GGM).  The family was there for only a few weeks when the parents contracted yellow fever and both died at the age of 24 within a weeks of each other.

After their parents' death, the girls were raised by their maternal grandmother in South Carolina.  The speculation is, how did they get back?  There were no family members in Mississippi that I can tell, so kind people either

1. cared for the girls until their relatives arrived to collect them, or
2. they were escorted by kind people back to their kin. 

Either way, there must have been community support that helped out.   I learned of this story recently from a newly acquainted cousin who is in his 90's, and remembers GGM (his grandmother) well.   

The whole story makes me a bit sad, appreciative of our medical care today, and appreciative of how we care for each other.   

doodlemor:

--- Quote from: HungryHungryKitties on June 12, 2012, 06:27:49 PM ---Mine is not so much re-telling a story, as it is speculation.

In the genealogy research I have been doing, I found out that my great-great-grandparents moved with their two young daughters ages 2 and 3 from South Carolina to Mississippi in the late 1860's.  The 3-yo was my great-grandmother (GGM).  The family was there for only a few weeks when the parents contracted yellow fever and both died at the age of 24 within a weeks of each other.

After their parents' death, the girls were raised by their maternal grandmother in South Carolina.  The speculation is, how did they get back?  There were no family members in Mississippi that I can tell, so kind people either

1. cared for the girls until their relatives arrived to collect them, or
2. they were escorted by kind people back to their kin. 

Either way, there must have been community support that helped out.   I learned of this story recently from a newly acquainted cousin who is in his 90's, and remembers GGM (his grandmother) well.   

The whole story makes me a bit sad, appreciative of our medical care today, and appreciative of how we care for each other.

--- End quote ---

What a poignant story, HungryHungryKitties!  How awful it must have been for that young couple, to be so sick and dying and knowing that their daughters would be alone.

I wonder if there are any old newpaper archives that would give you more information.  Victorians had soft hearts for sad stories, and situations like this would be big news in small towns.

HungryHungryKitties:

--- Quote from: doodlemor on June 12, 2012, 07:22:55 PM ---
--- Quote from: HungryHungryKitties on June 12, 2012, 06:27:49 PM ---Mine is not so much re-telling a story, as it is speculation.

In the genealogy research I have been doing, I found out that my great-great-grandparents moved with their two young daughters ages 2 and 3 from South Carolina to Mississippi in the late 1860's.  The 3-yo was my great-grandmother (GGM).  The family was there for only a few weeks when the parents contracted yellow fever and both died at the age of 24 within a weeks of each other.

After their parents' death, the girls were raised by their maternal grandmother in South Carolina.  The speculation is, how did they get back?  There were no family members in Mississippi that I can tell, so kind people either

1. cared for the girls until their relatives arrived to collect them, or
2. they were escorted by kind people back to their kin. 

Either way, there must have been community support that helped out.   I learned of this story recently from a newly acquainted cousin who is in his 90's, and remembers GGM (his grandmother) well.   

The whole story makes me a bit sad, appreciative of our medical care today, and appreciative of how we care for each other.

--- End quote ---

What a poignant story, HungryHungryKitties!  How awful it must have been for that young couple, to be so sick and dying and knowing that their daughters would be alone.

I wonder if there are any old newpaper archives that would give you more information.  Victorians had soft hearts for sad stories, and situations like this would be big news in small towns.

--- End quote ---

Great tip, doodlemor!  I'll give that a try.  Thanks!

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