Author Topic: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real  (Read 5173 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Ereine

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1114
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2012, 12:28:32 PM »
I'm in Finland. Here the cards need to be signed and can be taken away by a cashier if they aren't, then you have to pay your bank to get it back and it isn't cheap. Fortunately, when that happened to me the cashier was nice and didn't take it and lost the reward she would have received. Many people have combination credit/debit cards and all news cards of any type have chips. I can't remember when was the last time I signed anything. When paying online many places use something like Verified by Visa which requires me to identify myself with my online banking id, which seems quite secure. Apart from having to enter the credit card number I also have to know the password for my account and have to have access to a small card with codes that my bank sent to me, the codes change every time.   

I have to jump in because the Verified by Visa / Mastercard SecureCode program is a huge pet peeve of mine. It is actually designed very badly and is not more secure. The main effect (when you sign the TOS) is to push liability for transactions onto the consumer rather than the merchant or the bank.

Here is a short and very readable white paper on the subject by Stephen Murdoch and Ross Anderson:
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/Papers/fc10vbvsecurecode.pdf

Now back to your regularly scheduled thread.

Thank you, but that seems to be very different from the way it works here. There are no pop-up windows, I am transferred to my bank's website (of course that could be faked, I'm sure scammers could find out which bank issued my credit card) and the url is shown. Then I sign in (every time) with my customer number and a password that I have chosen myself. Then there's a number on the screen and I have to look at a small plastic card to find a number it corresponds to (the card has pairs of numbers, for example 9765 and 246643 and when I get prompted for 9765 I'll enter 246643. A pair of numbers is only used once and they're chosen in random order so you never know what the next one is and I get sent a new card before I run out of numbers). So not really a single sign system, to me it almost seems as secure as paying bills online in general, though obviously the scammers could get my credit card number but that would happen even without the verification system. You don't have to opt in to use it here, so you don't accept any terms of conditions that say that's it's all your fault.     

Harriet

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 235
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #16 on: June 14, 2012, 12:30:33 PM »
I'm in Finland. Here the cards need to be signed and can be taken away by a cashier if they aren't, then you have to pay your bank to get it back and it isn't cheap. Fortunately, when that happened to me the cashier was nice and didn't take it and lost the reward she would have received. Many people have combination credit/debit cards and all news cards of any type have chips. I can't remember when was the last time I signed anything. When paying online many places use something like Verified by Visa which requires me to identify myself with my online banking id, which seems quite secure. Apart from having to enter the credit card number I also have to know the password for my account and have to have access to a small card with codes that my bank sent to me, the codes change every time.   

I have to jump in because the Verified by Visa / Mastercard SecureCode program is a huge pet peeve of mine. It is actually designed very badly and is not more secure. The main effect (when you sign the TOS) is to push liability for transactions onto the consumer rather than the merchant or the bank.

Here is a short and very readable white paper on the subject by Stephen Murdoch and Ross Anderson:
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/Papers/fc10vbvsecurecode.pdf

Now back to your regularly scheduled thread.

Thank you, but that seems to be very different from the way it works here. There are no pop-up windows, I am transferred to my bank's website (of course that could be faked, I'm sure scammers could find out which bank issued my credit card) and the url is shown. Then I sign in (every time) with my customer number and a password that I have chosen myself. Then there's a number on the screen and I have to look at a small plastic card to find a number it corresponds to (the card has pairs of numbers, for example 9765 and 246643 and when I get prompted for 9765 I'll enter 246643. A pair of numbers is only used once and they're chosen in random order so you never know what the next one is and I get sent a new card before I run out of numbers). So not really a single sign system, to me it almost seems as secure as paying bills online in general, though obviously the scammers could get my credit card number but that would happen even without the verification system. You don't have to opt in to use it here, so you don't accept any terms of conditions that say that's it's all your fault.   

That's very interesting and it does sound much superior to the US version, especially the separate plastic card-with-code bit. Thanks for explaining!

123sandy

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 548
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #17 on: June 14, 2012, 05:46:41 PM »
I was shopping in Edinburgh a couple of years ago and the assistant would not make my sale as I had my husbands credit card. I had to leave empty handed and get him to go in and finish the purchase.

Ereine

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1114
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #18 on: June 15, 2012, 12:31:18 AM »
I was shopping in Edinburgh a couple of years ago and the assistant would not make my sale as I had my husbands credit card. I had to leave empty handed and get him to go in and finish the purchase.

Here they probably would have taken the card away (and you'd have to pay the ransom to get it back), if there weren't more serious consequences.

baglady

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4607
  • A big lass and a bonny lass and she loves her beer
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #19 on: June 18, 2012, 03:49:18 PM »
Last month I got asked for ID for the first time since can't remember when. I was paying with a card that I hadn't signed ... it's so rare for a merchant to compare sigs (or to actually handle the card, for that matter -- in a lot of stores you scan it yourself), that I just never bothered. And wouldn't you know it, I didn't *have* my license on me. I'd literally left it in my other pants. The nice ladies at the store let the transaction go through anyway and joked about how I'd had the bad luck to be waited on by "The Enforcer" that day.
My photography is on Redbubble! Come see: http://www.redbubble.com/people/baglady

Bales

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 127
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #20 on: June 18, 2012, 07:15:57 PM »
I'm in the U.S. and I have found that the only time I'm asked to see my card - and my ID to be sure it matches - is when I'm shopping in stores that cater to younger clientele.  For example, I just bought a top at H&M and Forever 21 and both asked me for my ID.  And those are the only two stores that I can recall asking for my ID in the past three years - and I shop a lot more than I should!  I figured they must get more fraud in those stores so have higher security precautions (that all stores are supposed to do, but don't.)

Jones

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2556
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #21 on: June 18, 2012, 08:10:12 PM »
I used to be asked for my ID when I lived in an area with a higher crime rate. However I have no problem using my husband's card, or my boss's, in the area where I now live.

siamesecat2965

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8653
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2012, 03:49:47 PM »
Once in a blue moon I'll get asked for ID, but other than that, either I swipe my card, or they take it and swipe at the register.  I know at TJ Maxx, even at the register, they will ask to see your card as they need to put in the security code as well. 

And as a cashier, I have to say, I don't check signatures.  We do so many transactions its hard to keep up, and most customers use their store card, and many are regulars, so not a big deal.

CakeBeret

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4247
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #23 on: June 19, 2012, 04:12:26 PM »
I did have one experience where I was denied a purchase after an ID check. It was at JC Penney, and I was using a store card in my husband's name. The cashier checked my ID and, even though our last names are the same, denied the sale because the card had a different first name. While I do understand if it's store policy, I rarely shop there anymore because it's a PITA to take my hubby with me.
"From a procrastination standpoint, today has been wildly successful."

Brisvegasgal

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 171
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #24 on: June 20, 2012, 06:41:43 AM »
Wow...it is so very different in Australia. I am surprised especially that a cashier will accept the quoting of a card number.  That would never happen here.

Venus193

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 15852
  • Backstage passes are wonderful things!
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #25 on: June 20, 2012, 07:05:27 AM »
If credit card companies would require a photo on them they could solve a lot of these problems. One of my banks now puts photos on debit and other ATM cards.  I think this is a Good Thing.

CakeBeret

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4247
Re: Credit Cards...is what happens on TV real
« Reply #26 on: June 20, 2012, 12:01:55 PM »
If credit card companies would require a photo on them they could solve a lot of these problems. One of my banks now puts photos on debit and other ATM cards.  I think this is a Good Thing.

I've seen that around here, too. It doesn't change anything, though. I used a co-worker's card with his photo on it, and the cashier let me use it anyway.
"From a procrastination standpoint, today has been wildly successful."