Author Topic: What American recipes would interest you?  (Read 22420 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Moray

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1869
  • My hovercraft is full of eels!
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #30 on: June 25, 2012, 06:31:51 PM »
Pecan Pie would definitely be a good one.

Chicken pot pie might be a good choice, or pot roast.
Utah

Sophia

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11729
  • xi
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #31 on: June 25, 2012, 11:22:33 PM »
I would imagine the pecans would be expensive, and maybe not so good. 

Iris

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3867
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2012, 12:07:08 AM »
As a non-American I am usually fascinated by the things I read about in books etc. that I have no experience of at all and even seem weird. For example I have read about people making smores by the campfire - I don't know what that actually means, other than it has something to do with marshmallows. It also (as an outsider) seems quite American to mix savoury and sweet - pancakes with bacon, for example.

So I would go with some of the great suggestions you have here and then throw in the occassional 'funny American' recipe or combination. I know that when I TRIED pancakes with bacon they were delicious, so it may be good to broaden people's horizons without too much cooking effort.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

violinp

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3543
  • cabbagegirl28's my sister :)
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2012, 01:20:21 AM »
As a non-American I am usually fascinated by the things I read about in books etc. that I have no experience of at all and even seem weird. For example I have read about people making smores by the campfire - I don't know what that actually means, other than it has something to do with marshmallows. It also (as an outsider) seems quite American to mix savoury and sweet - pancakes with bacon, for example.

So I would go with some of the great suggestions you have here and then throw in the occassional 'funny American' recipe or combination. I know that when I TRIED pancakes with bacon they were delicious, so it may be good to broaden people's horizons without too much cooking effort.

Smores are a marshmallow and part of a Hershey's candy bar mashed between two graham cracker halves. It's really delicious, but is really only eaten when camping in my experience.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Iris

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3867
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #34 on: June 26, 2012, 03:04:10 AM »
As a non-American I am usually fascinated by the things I read about in books etc. that I have no experience of at all and even seem weird. For example I have read about people making smores by the campfire - I don't know what that actually means, other than it has something to do with marshmallows. It also (as an outsider) seems quite American to mix savoury and sweet - pancakes with bacon, for example.

So I would go with some of the great suggestions you have here and then throw in the occassional 'funny American' recipe or combination. I know that when I TRIED pancakes with bacon they were delicious, so it may be good to broaden people's horizons without too much cooking effort.

Smores are a marshmallow and part of a Hershey's candy bar mashed between two graham cracker halves. It's really delicious, but is really only eaten when camping in my experience.

Thanks. I have only heard (read) of them in conjunction with camping, but my suggestion would be to include something like that with a local comparison (eg what local biscuits are most like Graham crackers) on some weeks rather than a recipe a such. I know I'd be interested and probably give it a go whereas I may not make NY cheesecake(say) because I rarely cook desserts anymore.

Just an idea.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

Sharnita

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 21387
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #35 on: June 26, 2012, 08:08:40 AM »
As an MAerican I have to say that Chicken Pot Pie and Pecan Pie are two of my favorites, I I jsut never thought of them as being "American".  I also really love chocolate  chip cookies and brownies.

PastryGoddess

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4656
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #36 on: June 26, 2012, 11:42:35 AM »
mmmmm smores...

They also taste quite yummy from a fireplace too :)

SoCalVal

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2442
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #37 on: July 01, 2012, 01:54:47 AM »
what local biscuits are most like Graham crackers

I think Digestive biscuits are closest.



Venus193

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 15857
  • Backstage passes are wonderful things!
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #38 on: July 01, 2012, 05:42:42 AM »
Don't forget Chocolate Chip cookies.  Those have to be the most popular in the country.

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6690
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #39 on: July 01, 2012, 10:33:01 AM »
As an American living in Germany, I am most often asked for Brownies and Chocolate Chip Cookies.

Someone mentioned Split Pea Soup -- there is nothing particulalry American about that!

Corn on the cob is also a good one.

Yes.  American split pea soup uses green peas.  there's also an excellent Swedish version that uses yellow peas. 

Ms_Cellany

  • The Queen of Squee
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5722
  • Big white goggie? No. Hasn't seen him.
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #40 on: July 01, 2012, 10:40:20 AM »
Back to chicken fried steak - my mom and I once insisted that a German visitor try CFS as a Texas speciality. He ordered it, tasted, and mused for a second, then said "Zis is schnitzel!"

At which point we had a lightbulb moment that of course it came from the German settlers!
Current fosters: Boojum (F, adult); Zuul (F); Magpie (M); Balrog (M); Nazgul (F)

Kitty Hawk

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 235
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #41 on: July 01, 2012, 03:32:34 PM »
Meatloaf

Quite a populr dish in Germany under the name "Hackbraten".

Moray

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1869
  • My hovercraft is full of eels!
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #42 on: July 01, 2012, 04:34:52 PM »
Meatloaf

Quite a populr dish in Germany under the name "Hackbraten".

I think we'd be pretty hard-pressed to come up with something that isn't originally from someplace else. All we can really go for is "American preparation of [x dish]" :D

For example, the iconic image of American meatloaf involves a ketchup-based sauce baked on top. Although frankfurters aren't native to the USA, a Chicago dog, with all the fixins, could reasonably be considered an American institution.
Utah

purplemuse

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5851
  • This is going to be super special awesome!
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #43 on: July 02, 2012, 07:23:06 PM »
Chicken Riggies?

I haven't used this recipe myself, but it has good reviews:

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/chicken-riggies/

Kitty Hawk

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 235
Re: What American recipes would interest you?
« Reply #44 on: July 04, 2012, 02:05:24 AM »

I think we'd be pretty hard-pressed to come up with something that isn't originally from someplace else. All we can really go for is "American preparation of [x dish]" :D

For example, the iconic image of American meatloaf involves a ketchup-based sauce baked on top. Although frankfurters aren't native to the USA, a Chicago dog, with all the fixins, could reasonably be considered an American institution.

This is pretty much the point I was trying to make, although too obscurely. Many dishes may be typically American but are most certainly not exclusively American.  The trick is to find what -- if anything -- makes them unique.

One other problem is finding ingredients here in Europe.  Molasses? Cranberry sauce?  Don't exist here.  Pecans? Yes, at Christmas and barely affordable.

One of our most successful parties was an "American-style cookout" with hamburgers and cheeseburgers, chicken breasts, baked beans and watermelon.  All commonly available foods here in Germany, but perhaps not so commonly eaten (the baked beans) or prepared in different ways.

And a brownie trifle for dessert!