News: IT'S THE 2ND ANNUAL GUATEMALA LIBRARY PROJECT BOOK DRIVE!    LOOKING FOR DONATIONS OF SCIENCE BOOKS THIS YEAR.    Check it out in the "Extending the Hand of Kindness" folder or here: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=139832.msg3372084#msg3372084   

  • November 18, 2017, 05:46:14 PM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 139449 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Thipu1

  • Member
  • Posts: 7439
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #435 on: October 26, 2012, 08:08:24 AM »
No.  You go to then to lab to pick up your pictures. 

Films are movies with sub-titles that play in very small cinemas.  Disney makes movies, not films. 

Diane AKA Traska

  • Member
  • Posts: 4637
  • Or you can just call me Diane. (NE USA EHellion)
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #436 on: October 26, 2012, 08:22:13 AM »
No, you use a SD card reader to get your pictures.  :D
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

starry diadem

  • Member
  • Posts: 485
  • διάδημα: The Glass Hat
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #437 on: October 26, 2012, 10:54:40 AM »
NO the theatre is where you have your operation, the surgery is where your GP practices

No, the theater is where you go to watch movies.  :D

No, the theatre is where you go to see live plays.  The cinema is where you go to watch films.

Ah, the joys of a common language.

No, you go to the cinema to watch movies.  You pick up your films from the photo lab.

Nope, I pick up my photos from the photo lab.  And the negatives.   At least I did, in the good old days before we digitalised our entire lives.

I only go to the movies when I'm in the US.
Mysterious ravens go after local farmer's potatoes


bansidhe

  • Member
  • Posts: 1991
    • The Menagerie
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #438 on: October 26, 2012, 01:59:32 PM »
Films are movies with sub-titles that play in very small cinemas.  Disney makes movies, not films.

Thank you. The indiscriminate use of "film" is one of my big pet peeves. I once saw a magazine article titled The Films of Keanu Reeves. That dude most definitely does not make films. In fact, I would characterize most of them as flicks.
Esan ozenki!

Arizona

Mental Magpie

  • Member
  • Posts: 4138
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #439 on: October 26, 2012, 06:37:46 PM »
I meant to say you "drop off" your film at the photo lab, not pick up them.

Thipu1

  • Member
  • Posts: 7439
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #440 on: October 26, 2012, 07:38:40 PM »
Well, first you drop off your pictures at the photo lab,  then you pick up the prints. 

Ah, the old complaint about photo labs, 'Someday my prints will come'.


Mental Magpie

  • Member
  • Posts: 4138
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #441 on: October 26, 2012, 07:40:25 PM »
Well, first you drop off your pictures at the photo lab,  then you pick up the prints. 

Ah, the old complaint about photo labs, 'Someday my prints will come'.

I drop off my film and pick up my pictures.

wendelenn

  • Member
  • Posts: 1503
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #442 on: October 26, 2012, 07:50:00 PM »
Films are movies with sub-titles that play in very small cinemas.  Disney makes movies, not films.

Thank you. The indiscriminate use of "film" is one of my big pet peeves. I once saw a magazine article titled The Films of Keanu Reeves. That dude most definitely does not make films. In fact, I would characterize most of them as flicks.

Maybe, but flicks are also chocolate flavored candy (says this San Francisco-bred girl)

http://www.oldtimecandy.com/flicks.htm

Couldn't resist :)
"I don't mean to be rude", he began, in a tone that threatened rudeness in every syllable.

"--yet sadly, accidental rudeness occurs alarmingly often," Dumbledore finished the sentence gravely.  "Best to say nothing at all."

oz diva

  • Member
  • Posts: 1212
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #443 on: October 26, 2012, 08:59:51 PM »
Well, first you drop off your pictures at the photo lab,  then you pick up the prints. 

Ah, the old complaint about photo labs, 'Someday my prints will come'.

I drop off my film and pick up my pictures.
I used to do that, probably even in this century, but not this decade.

Victoria

scotcat60

  • Member
  • Posts: 720
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #444 on: October 27, 2012, 09:44:59 AM »
I drop my film off at Boots, a large chemists chain in the UK, they sened it off to be developed, and then I collected the prints later on.

starry diadem

  • Member
  • Posts: 485
  • διάδημα: The Glass Hat
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #445 on: October 27, 2012, 10:59:28 AM »
To get us back on track re grammar, I wanted to test your views on 'shined' versus 'shone'. 

I can't think of a situation where I'd use "shined" for the past tense of the verb 'to shine'.  I'd always use 'shone'.  So the moon shone in the sky; the light of the torch (flashlight, in the US) shone on the path to light our way etc.  I don't ever shine my shoes: I polish them.  To me, 'shined' sounds totally wrong. 

So, is this just another transatlantic difference that we should forget about or is there a real case to be made to regularise all our irregular verbs?  I can't say I'd like that concept, but I can understand that it would make English an easier language to learn!




Mysterious ravens go after local farmer's potatoes


Thipu1

  • Member
  • Posts: 7439
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #446 on: October 27, 2012, 01:47:45 PM »
'Shined' vs 'Shone' is a tough one. 

One could say that someone had, 'beautifully shined shoes'.  'Shone' would never be used there. 

After an evening storm, one could say that, 'In the morning, the Sun shone beautifully'.

As I understand it, 'shined' is usually used when someone polishes something.

'Shone' is used when something or someone is doing their own shining. 

A middle situation may be when Jimmy makes a good performance.  You can say that, 'Jimmy really shined in that role' or that 'Jimmy really shone in that role'.

That's because Jimmy made the role shine from both meanings. 


pinkyblue

  • Member
  • Posts: 224
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #447 on: October 27, 2012, 10:50:48 PM »
"Laundrymat."  Please ... it's "laundromat."  AARRGGHH!

Specky

  • Member
  • Posts: 762
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #448 on: October 27, 2012, 11:50:59 PM »
Liberry
Alot
Him and me
Myself and her
APOSTROPHES!

starry diadem

  • Member
  • Posts: 485
  • διάδημα: The Glass Hat
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #449 on: October 28, 2012, 02:07:44 AM »
From Thipu1 :

'Shined' vs 'Shone' is a tough one. 

One could say that someone had, 'beautifully shined shoes'.  'Shone' would never be used there. 

Well, 'shined' is acting as an adjective in that phrase, rather than a verb, but even so I'd say 'Joe had beautifully polished shoes'.  Or maybe 'Joe's shoes are beautifully shiny!"


After an evening storm, one could say that, 'In the morning, the Sun shone beautifully'.

Yes!  Thumbs up!



As I understand it, 'shined' is usually used when someone polishes something.

'Shone' is used when something or someone is doing their own shining. 


I've seen this distinction before  - and of course, I've heard of 'shoe-shine boys' - but I'm coming to the conclusion that it's a transatlantic difference.  Shoe-shine machines or stations (you see the odd one here and there here.  I know there's one in Canary Wharf, for all those banking executives who need shiny shoes!) are probably the only example I can think of in the UK where this might apply. 

Of course, that may be regional here, and 'shined' as a verb may be more common elsewhere in the UK.  And I may be thoroughly old fashioned and other UK EHellions are sniggering at me!



A middle situation may be when Jimmy makes a good performance.  You can say that, 'Jimmy really shined in that role' or that 'Jimmy really shone in that role'.

That's because Jimmy made the role shine from both meanings.


Again, it would be 'shone', for me.

An intractable problem, I fear!




On another note, I read a lot of US authored fanfiction, and increasingly I see things like:

"That is so cliché!"  rather than what I'd write, which would be "That is so clichéd!" 

Or

"You are so prejudice!"  instead of "You are so prejudiced."   


For me, 'cliché'  and 'prejudice' are nouns, not an adjectives.
Mysterious ravens go after local farmer's potatoes