Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 43719 times)

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Slartibartfast

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #240 on: August 15, 2012, 04:23:56 PM »
I didn't re-read the whole thread to see if this had been addressed, but I don't recall it.

I do an inner eyeroll when people start a statement with 'Honestly,...' or 'To tell the truth,...'  Do you lie otherwise?  Next time, try 'Frankly,...' or 'To be blunt...'  Please?

Not lie, necessarily, but "honestly . . ." usually seems to mean "I am choosing to say this bluntly instead of sugar-coating it with little white lies and lies of omission."  So I get what you're saying  :P but I don't think they're meaningless.

scotcat60

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #241 on: August 16, 2012, 12:07:52 PM »
I heard someone on TV last night saying that supplies of a certain product had to be "Aired in" from abroad. I would have said they'd had to be "Flown" in from abroad.

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #242 on: August 16, 2012, 01:09:58 PM »
I know someone who somehow twisted being told never to say "Iím good" in favor of "Iím well" to essentially never use the word good.

So, Iíll ask them their opinion on how something looks (like a new project, etc), and they respond with "It looks well."  My quilt looks to be in good health?

Trogdor

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #243 on: August 16, 2012, 01:20:15 PM »
A pet peeve of mine: Confusing than and then. One is comparative, the other is consecutive.

I see "I'm taller then her" and "He got out of the car, than I did" all the time.

Mental Magpie

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #244 on: August 16, 2012, 01:46:40 PM »
A pet peeve of mine: Confusing than and then. One is comparative, the other is consecutive.

I see "I'm taller then her" and "He got out of the car, than I did" all the time.

TROGDOR!!!!! (sorry, it came unbidden! :-[ )

I hate that, too.  I have also heard it said incorrectly, which only makes it worse for me.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #245 on: August 17, 2012, 10:04:54 AM »
Itís voilŗ.

Not wah-la. Not walla. Not viola.

Voilŗ.

I can excuse voila, if accents are beyond your technical capability.

(Or, when in doubt, just use English)

Elfmama

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #246 on: August 17, 2012, 04:31:32 PM »
Overheard one last night that made me get stabby: "I and her don't get along."
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Giggity

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #247 on: August 21, 2012, 09:25:26 AM »
In the vast majority of cases, it's "simple," not "simplistic." I just saw that on another thread. "I used to think X was complicated, then I Googled it and it's so simplistic, I can't wait to try it."
Words mean things.

Thipu1

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #248 on: August 21, 2012, 10:04:35 AM »
'Simplistic' isn't positive. 

I posted on another thread here about a pamphlet reviewing children's books.  The author consistently used 'simplistic' when 'simple' would have been correct. 

Some people think that adding a syllable or two makes their writing sound more sophisticated.  It doesn't. 

Another thing that irritates me is the phrase, 'a couple things' for 'several'.  'A couple OF things' is fine.



Editeer

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #249 on: August 21, 2012, 04:27:18 PM »
"It's in our/their DNA"--referring to a principle, practice, or custom of a company or team, or something they are committed to.
 "At XYZ Company, we care about quality. It's in our DNA."
"Our team gives 110%. It's in our DNA."
"The user experience is my highest priority--it's in my DNA!"

No. Brown eyes are in your DNA. Blood type is in your DNA. You are not responsible for them, and they do not reflect positively or negatively on you--they just are. A concern for customer service is something you can choose to have and to act on.

This one is really common where I work.  :P 
I wonder if anyone would say it at, say, a biotech company?  ;)


stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #250 on: August 21, 2012, 04:32:52 PM »
Iíve come to the conclusion that Iíd rather see apostrophe use die out than see another apostrophe carelessly plunged into a plural.

In the mean time, I cope by inserting attributes or words after the plural to make it be a possessive.

"All CDís on sale!" becomes "All CDís puppies on sale!" (not that it makes any more sense, but at least it is closer to correct grammar!)

Slartibartfast

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #251 on: August 21, 2012, 05:44:48 PM »
"It's in our/their DNA"--referring to a principle, practice, or custom of a company or team, or something they are committed to.
 "At XYZ Company, we care about quality. It's in our DNA."
"Our team gives 110%. It's in our DNA."
"The user experience is my highest priority--it's in my DNA!"

No. Brown eyes are in your DNA. Blood type is in your DNA. You are not responsible for them, and they do not reflect positively or negatively on you--they just are. A concern for customer service is something you can choose to have and to act on.

This one is really common where I work.  :P 
I wonder if anyone would say it at, say, a biotech company?  ;)

DH works for a lab which does gene sequencing.  The answer is no, you don't hear this, but you do hear a lot of people gripe about it  :P

starry diadem

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #252 on: August 25, 2012, 05:56:09 AM »
I found these on LiveJournal this morning and thought I'd share:



Mysterious ravens go after local farmer's potatoes


CakeEater

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #253 on: August 26, 2012, 12:38:02 AM »
'Simplistic' isn't positive. 

I posted on another thread here about a pamphlet reviewing children's books.  The author consistently used 'simplistic' when 'simple' would have been correct. 

Some people think that adding a syllable or two makes their writing sound more sophisticated.  It doesn't. 

Another thing that irritates me is the phrase, 'a couple things' for 'several'.  'A couple OF things' is fine.

Is the bolded a regional thing in the US? I read a series of books, which I really liked, but the characters were always grabbing a 'couple beers' or grilling a 'couple steaks' or making a 'couple phone calls'. I chose not to start on another series of that author's because it made my eyes sore.

Thipu1

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #254 on: August 26, 2012, 10:01:14 AM »
I don't know if it's regional but it's getting more and more common in news reports and published non-fiction.  It's one thing to see it in novels.  It's quite another to find it in magazines and newspapers.