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Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 135452 times)

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Elfmama

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #270 on: August 29, 2012, 08:40:05 PM »
I think this is more of a spelling issue than a grammar one - but gurl instead of girl.   

I know not everyone is a brilliant speller, but really, girl is not a hard one to learn!


http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1914111 has a nice explanation and an interesting coincidence "PS From the mighty Webster: "Girl" comes from the old English "girle", that was also spelled "gerle" and "gurle""

(Some of the posts are in Italian but not all.)
And was originally a term used for all young people, female AND male!
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

AfleetAlex

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #271 on: August 30, 2012, 01:53:20 PM »
A spelling one from the fair: carmel apples. No, no, no, it's CARAMEL. Carmel is a place.  :D
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

Thipu1

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #272 on: August 31, 2012, 08:49:03 AM »
A spelling one from the fair: carmel apples. No, no, no, it's CARAMEL. Carmel is a place.  :D

Very true, however here, caramel is usually pronounced 'CAR-mel'.  It's still a spelling error but it's a somewhat understandable one.

AfleetAlex

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #273 on: August 31, 2012, 10:52:40 AM »
Very true, and I do say it carmel instead of cara-mel. But the spelling kinda makes me wince, just a little.  ;D
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #274 on: August 31, 2012, 10:59:18 AM »
Separate was another favorite of my English professor's words - not seperate, aggh.

My freshman English teacher was a fan of "Separate. It has 'a rat' in it. And you’d want to separate a rat from you, right?"
Depends -- some people have pet rats, and love them dearly  :) ...

Another remembering-device for "separate" which I've come across, goes: "Se and Rate were fighting; their Pa came in and separated them." (That, for me, is one of the kind re which it would seem simpler just to remember the information itself; but people's mileages vary.)

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #275 on: August 31, 2012, 11:16:42 AM »
Separate was another favorite of my English professor's words - not seperate, aggh.

My freshman English teacher was a fan of "Separate. It has 'a rat' in it. And you’d want to separate a rat from you, right?"
Depends -- some people have pet rats, and love them dearly  :) ...

Another remembering-device for "separate" which I've come across, goes: "Se and Rate were fighting; their Pa came in and separated them." (That, for me, is one of the kind re which it would seem simpler just to remember the information itself; but people's mileages vary.)

I agree. But I know some things like that do work, or you end up remembering them as they’re crammed into your head.

For instance, I can’t write onomatopoeia without my brain saying "O, no ma! To poe I a!" because said English teacher also drilled that into us.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #276 on: August 31, 2012, 12:03:01 PM »
For sure -- different mnemonics suit different people.

I remember reading a book of memoirs by the novelist Anthony Burgess, one of whose hobbies was learning foreign languages. He mentioned that in the course of doing same, he often thought up mnemonics which were so complicated / just plain silly, that he'd be embarrassed to tell them to anyone else. One which he did vouchsafe, was: in the course of a spell of employment in Malaysia, he set about learning Malay. A word in that language is "bermastautin", meaning to settle, or take up residence, in a place. Burgess's memory-aid for this, was: he thought of a Scotsman, with a fondness for the "stout" variety of beer, domiciled out east. This imaginary character walks into a house and takes possession of it, doing all the territory-marking stuff; then sinks into an armchair and calls to his native "bearer": "Ah'm settled here; bear ma stout in".

MamaMootz

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #277 on: August 31, 2012, 05:26:28 PM »
I know this isn't technically a grammatical issue, but a pronunciation one. It still makes me crazy.

There is a woman on the Weather Channel that persistently pronounces "Gulf of Mexico" as "GOLF of Mexico". It makes me insane.

Golf is a game. The gulf is the place with lots of water.
"I like pie" - DD's Patented Bean Dip Maneuver

Elfmama

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #278 on: August 31, 2012, 07:00:10 PM »
I know this isn't technically a grammatical issue, but a pronunciation one. It still makes me crazy.

There is a woman on the Weather Channel that persistently pronounces "Gulf of Mexico" as "GOLF of Mexico". It makes me insane.

Golf is a game. The gulf is the place with lots of water.
The ones in the Baltimore area cannot say "temperature" with all four syllables.  They usually slur it to "temchur."
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Oh Joy

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #279 on: August 31, 2012, 07:09:04 PM »
Separate was another favorite of my English professor's words - not seperate, aggh.

My freshman English teacher was a fan of "Separate. It has 'a rat' in it. And you’d want to separate a rat from you, right?"
Depends -- some people have pet rats, and love them dearly  :) ...

Another remembering-device for "separate" which I've come across, goes: "Se and Rate were fighting; their Pa came in and separated them." (That, for me, is one of the kind re which it would seem simpler just to remember the information itself; but people's mileages vary.)

I've liked "Sep's wife saw a rat and yelled, 'Sep!  A rat!  Eeeeeee!'"
 

Thipu1

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #280 on: August 31, 2012, 08:32:47 PM »
I know this isn't technically a grammatical issue, but a pronunciation one. It still makes me crazy.

There is a woman on the Weather Channel that persistently pronounces "Gulf of Mexico" as "GOLF of Mexico". It makes me insane.

Golf is a game. The gulf is the place with lots of water.
The ones in the Baltimore area cannot say "temperature" with all four syllables.  They usually slur it to "temchur."

In NYC, temperature is us usually pronounced as 'TEM-per-chur'.

Venus193

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #281 on: September 01, 2012, 07:52:42 AM »
Pronunciation gets me, too.  Too many examples to list.





crella

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #282 on: September 02, 2012, 07:32:08 PM »
'A large amount of people' is really common but bugs me.

Mental Magpie

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #283 on: September 05, 2012, 07:13:52 AM »
It is not a pant.  A pant is only one part of it, hence why it is called a pair of pants.  A pant is just one side, so please do not insist on finding me a pant that fits my shape as I want a pair of them sewn together.  I realize this is big in the garment/fashion industry and that only bothers me more because it seems to me that it came about to make those saying it feel more refined.  This may not be the case, they may have always called it a pant but it is only leaking out of the fashion/garment world recently, but that is still how I interpret it.  I also just think it sounds stupid.

Elfmama

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #284 on: September 05, 2012, 12:04:38 PM »
Two of my real biggies: "He gots a apple." I've stomped on my kids and grandkids any time I hear one or the other.  My girls were quick to understand, but the grandsons were much more stubborn about it.

We're still working on when one uses "Bob and I" vs. "Bob and me."
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~