Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 45495 times)

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Free Range Hippy Chick

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #270 on: August 29, 2012, 06:29:48 PM »
I've seen these being misused on here more than once: presumptuous is not the same as presumptive.

Presumptive means based on a reasonable belief about what is likely to be the case. Hence the heir presumptive is the person likely to inherit a position or honour, but who may be supplanted by the birth of another person with a better claim. If Lord Thing has no children, his brother is the heir presumptive. If Lord Thing dies childless, the brother gets the title. If Lord Thing marries and has a son (we won't go into titles passing in the female line, it's too difficult), that son is the heir apparent - he definitely gets the title if he lives, and the brother doesn't.

Presumptive has nothing to do with good manners.

Presumptuous means behaving in a way you have no right to do and which may seem rude. If I ask you about your medical history, scrabble habits, and financial status, I'm presumptuous, not presumptive.

Thipu1

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #271 on: August 29, 2012, 07:50:37 PM »
Regarding 'gurls' vs. 'girl's', is it possible that the posters went one step away from 'grrls'?

That was a term used by some feminists to indicate that they were not polite, little shrinking violets.

Think about the 'Guerilla Girls' and how they seek to bring attention to women artists. 

squeakers

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #272 on: August 29, 2012, 08:47:47 PM »
I think this is more of a spelling issue than a grammar one - but gurl instead of girl.   

I know not everyone is a brilliant speller, but really, girl is not a hard one to learn!


http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1914111 has a nice explanation and an interesting coincidence "PS From the mighty Webster: "Girl" comes from the old English "girle", that was also spelled "gerle" and "gurle""

(Some of the posts are in Italian but not all.)
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Elfmama

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #273 on: August 29, 2012, 09:40:05 PM »
I think this is more of a spelling issue than a grammar one - but gurl instead of girl.   

I know not everyone is a brilliant speller, but really, girl is not a hard one to learn!


http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1914111 has a nice explanation and an interesting coincidence "PS From the mighty Webster: "Girl" comes from the old English "girle", that was also spelled "gerle" and "gurle""

(Some of the posts are in Italian but not all.)
And was originally a term used for all young people, female AND male!
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AfleetAlex

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #274 on: August 30, 2012, 02:53:20 PM »
A spelling one from the fair: carmel apples. No, no, no, it's CARAMEL. Carmel is a place.  :D
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

Thipu1

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #275 on: August 31, 2012, 09:49:03 AM »
A spelling one from the fair: carmel apples. No, no, no, it's CARAMEL. Carmel is a place.  :D

Very true, however here, caramel is usually pronounced 'CAR-mel'.  It's still a spelling error but it's a somewhat understandable one.

AfleetAlex

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #276 on: August 31, 2012, 11:52:40 AM »
Very true, and I do say it carmel instead of cara-mel. But the spelling kinda makes me wince, just a little.  ;D
I have a chronic case of foot-in-mouth disease.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #277 on: August 31, 2012, 11:59:18 AM »
Separate was another favorite of my English professor's words - not seperate, aggh.

My freshman English teacher was a fan of "Separate. It has 'a rat' in it. And you’d want to separate a rat from you, right?"
Depends -- some people have pet rats, and love them dearly  :) ...

Another remembering-device for "separate" which I've come across, goes: "Se and Rate were fighting; their Pa came in and separated them." (That, for me, is one of the kind re which it would seem simpler just to remember the information itself; but people's mileages vary.)

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #278 on: August 31, 2012, 12:16:42 PM »
Separate was another favorite of my English professor's words - not seperate, aggh.

My freshman English teacher was a fan of "Separate. It has 'a rat' in it. And you’d want to separate a rat from you, right?"
Depends -- some people have pet rats, and love them dearly  :) ...

Another remembering-device for "separate" which I've come across, goes: "Se and Rate were fighting; their Pa came in and separated them." (That, for me, is one of the kind re which it would seem simpler just to remember the information itself; but people's mileages vary.)

I agree. But I know some things like that do work, or you end up remembering them as they’re crammed into your head.

For instance, I can’t write onomatopoeia without my brain saying "O, no ma! To poe I a!" because said English teacher also drilled that into us.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #279 on: August 31, 2012, 01:03:01 PM »
For sure -- different mnemonics suit different people.

I remember reading a book of memoirs by the novelist Anthony Burgess, one of whose hobbies was learning foreign languages. He mentioned that in the course of doing same, he often thought up mnemonics which were so complicated / just plain silly, that he'd be embarrassed to tell them to anyone else. One which he did vouchsafe, was: in the course of a spell of employment in Malaysia, he set about learning Malay. A word in that language is "bermastautin", meaning to settle, or take up residence, in a place. Burgess's memory-aid for this, was: he thought of a Scotsman, with a fondness for the "stout" variety of beer, domiciled out east. This imaginary character walks into a house and takes possession of it, doing all the territory-marking stuff; then sinks into an armchair and calls to his native "bearer": "Ah'm settled here; bear ma stout in".

MamaMootz

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #280 on: August 31, 2012, 06:26:28 PM »
I know this isn't technically a grammatical issue, but a pronunciation one. It still makes me crazy.

There is a woman on the Weather Channel that persistently pronounces "Gulf of Mexico" as "GOLF of Mexico". It makes me insane.

Golf is a game. The gulf is the place with lots of water.
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Elfmama

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #281 on: August 31, 2012, 08:00:10 PM »
I know this isn't technically a grammatical issue, but a pronunciation one. It still makes me crazy.

There is a woman on the Weather Channel that persistently pronounces "Gulf of Mexico" as "GOLF of Mexico". It makes me insane.

Golf is a game. The gulf is the place with lots of water.
The ones in the Baltimore area cannot say "temperature" with all four syllables.  They usually slur it to "temchur."
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Oh Joy

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #282 on: August 31, 2012, 08:09:04 PM »
Separate was another favorite of my English professor's words - not seperate, aggh.

My freshman English teacher was a fan of "Separate. It has 'a rat' in it. And you’d want to separate a rat from you, right?"
Depends -- some people have pet rats, and love them dearly  :) ...

Another remembering-device for "separate" which I've come across, goes: "Se and Rate were fighting; their Pa came in and separated them." (That, for me, is one of the kind re which it would seem simpler just to remember the information itself; but people's mileages vary.)

I've liked "Sep's wife saw a rat and yelled, 'Sep!  A rat!  Eeeeeee!'"
 

Thipu1

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #283 on: August 31, 2012, 09:32:47 PM »
I know this isn't technically a grammatical issue, but a pronunciation one. It still makes me crazy.

There is a woman on the Weather Channel that persistently pronounces "Gulf of Mexico" as "GOLF of Mexico". It makes me insane.

Golf is a game. The gulf is the place with lots of water.
The ones in the Baltimore area cannot say "temperature" with all four syllables.  They usually slur it to "temchur."

In NYC, temperature is us usually pronounced as 'TEM-per-chur'.

Venus193

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #284 on: September 01, 2012, 08:52:42 AM »
Pronunciation gets me, too.  Too many examples to list.