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Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 127191 times)

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Yvaine

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #285 on: September 05, 2012, 12:07:34 PM »
It is not a pant.  A pant is only one part of it, hence why it is called a pair of pants.  A pant is just one side, so please do not insist on finding me a pant that fits my shape as I want a pair of them sewn together.  I realize this is big in the garment/fashion industry and that only bothers me more because it seems to me that it came about to make those saying it feel more refined.  This may not be the case, they may have always called it a pant but it is only leaking out of the fashion/garment world recently, but that is still how I interpret it.  I also just think it sounds stupid.

YES!!!

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #286 on: September 05, 2012, 12:21:52 PM »
Two of my real biggies: "He gots a apple." I've stomped on my kids and grandkids any time I hear one or the other.  My girls were quick to understand, but the grandsons were much more stubborn about it.

We're still working on when one uses "Bob and I" vs. "Bob and me."

I’ve lost count of the times we’ve corrected our 7 year old nephew from saying "Her wants the doll" or "Her wants to go get pizza with us too" when referencing his sister (or a woman). "She" just won’t sink in. I hope maybe his new teacher can get the point across.

wendelenn

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #287 on: September 05, 2012, 12:36:50 PM »
I saw this right here on Ehell: "Your aloud to (do that)."

Come on, people! It's not that hard!!
"I don't mean to be rude", he began, in a tone that threatened rudeness in every syllable.

"--yet sadly, accidental rudeness occurs alarmingly often," Dumbledore finished the sentence gravely.  "Best to say nothing at all."

Redneck Gravy

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #288 on: September 05, 2012, 02:27:22 PM »
I am stunned by the many misspellings I see on public forums (here included). 

If you can't spell, please look it up and don't embarrass yourself and show everyone your ignorance.

Today I saw slauter for slaughter on Facebook, how embarrassing to publicly announce that you don't know how to spell. 

Geez, at least we have spell check right here on eHell, how bad does it look when you misspell because you didn't even utilize spell check?  Is it becoming a lost art to spell correctly??

violinp

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #289 on: September 05, 2012, 04:10:18 PM »
To be fair, sometimes people have autocorrect on their phones, and it messes up what they were intending to say. And I know I've made a mistake or two on here when I thought I was free of spelling mistakes and I actually wasn't.  :-[
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #290 on: September 05, 2012, 04:13:49 PM »
I am stunned by the many misspellings I see on public forums (here included). 

If you can't spell, please look it up and don't embarrass yourself and show everyone your ignorance.

Today I saw slauter for slaughter on Facebook, how embarrassing to publicly announce that you don't know how to spell. 

Geez, at least we have spell check right here on eHell, how bad does it look when you misspell because you didn't even utilize spell check?  Is it becoming a lost art to spell correctly??

However, in the example given... spell check would *not* catch "aloud", as it is actually a word.
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #291 on: September 05, 2012, 04:14:42 PM »
Separate was another favorite of my English professor's words - not seperate, aggh.

My freshman English teacher was a fan of "Separate. It has 'a rat' in it. And you’d want to separate a rat from you, right?"
Depends -- some people have pet rats, and love them dearly  :) ...

Another remembering-device for "separate" which I've come across, goes: "Se and Rate were fighting; their Pa came in and separated them." (That, for me, is one of the kind re which it would seem simpler just to remember the information itself; but people's mileages vary.)

I agree. But I know some things like that do work, or you end up remembering them as they’re crammed into your head.

For instance, I can’t write onomatopoeia without my brain saying "O, no ma! To poe I a!" because said English teacher also drilled that into us.

I've always been amused that onomatopoeia isn't spelled exactly as it sounds.
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Giggity

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #292 on: September 06, 2012, 08:15:59 AM »
A trend I see on some forums (fora?) is to put a space before all punctuation marks.

This , you would think , would make someone ' s post - what ' s the word I ' m looking for ? - oh , yeah, " hard to read . "
Words mean things.

scotcat60

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #293 on: September 06, 2012, 10:35:34 AM »
I’ve lost count of the times we’ve corrected our 7 year old nephew from saying "Her wants the doll" or "Her wants to go get pizza with us too" when referencing his sister (or a woman).

Is he from the West Country of England? I had cousins from Dorset who would say "Her's upstairs ( or wherever) if asked the whereabouts of their sisters.

MamaMootz

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #294 on: September 06, 2012, 02:47:42 PM »
Twitching... my eye is twitching. Just saw this in an employment ad:

"Do you pour over the pages of the latest trend magazine?"

I dunno..... I guess I could pour my milk over it, if I really wanted to. :o
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #295 on: September 06, 2012, 02:55:25 PM »
Twitching... my eye is twitching. Just saw this in an employment ad:

"Do you pour over the pages of the latest trend magazine?"

I dunno..... I guess I could pour my milk over it, if I really wanted to. :o

That's the most brilliantly worded ad I've ever read!  I... wait, this IS for proofreaders, right?
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #296 on: September 06, 2012, 03:02:51 PM »
Twitching... my eye is twitching. Just saw this in an employment ad:

"Do you pour over the pages of the latest trend magazine?"

I dunno..... I guess I could pour my milk over it, if I really wanted to. :o

That's the most brilliantly worded ad I've ever read!  I... wait, this IS for proofreaders, right?

That reminds me, actually - I went to a presentation a few years back aimed at writers.  The presenter announced at the beginning that there was at least one error in the handout and anyone who found it got a piece of candy.  Seemed like a great way to cover up having made a typo, to me!  Because you just know that if she hadn't said something, everyone would be asking questions afterwards like "Did you know you're missing a question mark on page three?"

baglady

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #297 on: September 06, 2012, 04:17:50 PM »
I know this isn't technically a grammatical issue, but a pronunciation one. It still makes me crazy.

There is a woman on the Weather Channel that persistently pronounces "Gulf of Mexico" as "GOLF of Mexico". It makes me insane.

Golf is a game. The gulf is the place with lots of water.
The ones in the Baltimore area cannot say "temperature" with all four syllables.  They usually slur it to "temchur."

This one is coming up a lot lately because it's an election year in the U.S.: It's So-cial Se-cur-i-ty, people. Six syllables! But over and over again I hear politicians and commentators saying "Sosh-curty," or similar mushmouthed abominations. This isn't a regional pronunciation thing -- *everybody* does it. How hard is it to sound out a two-syllable word and a four-syllable word? And don't get me started on people who ask for your Social Security number with "What's your social?" or worse, "What's your sosh?"
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Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #298 on: September 06, 2012, 04:25:38 PM »
I know this isn't technically a grammatical issue, but a pronunciation one. It still makes me crazy.

There is a woman on the Weather Channel that persistently pronounces "Gulf of Mexico" as "GOLF of Mexico". It makes me insane.

Golf is a game. The gulf is the place with lots of water.
The ones in the Baltimore area cannot say "temperature" with all four syllables.  They usually slur it to "temchur."

This one is coming up a lot lately because it's an election year in the U.S.: It's So-cial Se-cur-i-ty, people. Six syllables! But over and over again I hear politicians and commentators saying "Sosh-curty," or similar mushmouthed abominations. This isn't a regional pronunciation thing -- *everybody* does it. How hard is it to sound out a two-syllable word and a four-syllable word? And don't get me started on people who ask for your Social Security number with "What's your social?" or worse, "What's your sosh?"

I don't mind "social" so much, I see it as the same as people refraining from saying "be sure to have you personal identification number handy when using your automated teller card."
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baglady

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #299 on: September 06, 2012, 04:52:24 PM »
I know this isn't technically a grammatical issue, but a pronunciation one. It still makes me crazy.

There is a woman on the Weather Channel that persistently pronounces "Gulf of Mexico" as "GOLF of Mexico". It makes me insane.

Golf is a game. The gulf is the place with lots of water.
The ones in the Baltimore area cannot say "temperature" with all four syllables.  They usually slur it to "temchur."

This one is coming up a lot lately because it's an election year in the U.S.: It's So-cial Se-cur-i-ty, people. Six syllables! But over and over again I hear politicians and commentators saying "Sosh-curty," or similar mushmouthed abominations. This isn't a regional pronunciation thing -- *everybody* does it. How hard is it to sound out a two-syllable word and a four-syllable word? And don't get me started on people who ask for your Social Security number with "What's your social?" or worse, "What's your sosh?"

I don't mind "social" so much, I see it as the same as people refraining from saying "be sure to have you personal identification number handy when using your automated teller card."

Instead they say PIN and ATM. Not "have your personal handy when using your automated," which is what "Tell me your social" sounds like to me. Couldn't we call it the SSN instead?
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