Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 45397 times)

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Thipu1

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #315 on: September 07, 2012, 10:14:52 AM »
I've been thinking about how 'pants' became 'pant'. So far, I've only seen it used for women's garments and there may be a reason.

A certain ensemble used to be called a 'pants suit'.  Lately, the term 'pantsuit' seems to be used.  It's even shown up in crosswords. 

Could that be how 'pants' lost its 's'?


Mental Magpie

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #316 on: September 07, 2012, 10:35:41 AM »
I've been thinking about how 'pants' became 'pant'. So far, I've only seen it used for women's garments and there may be a reason.

A certain ensemble used to be called a 'pants suit'.  Lately, the term 'pantsuit' seems to be used.  It's even shown up in crosswords. 

Could that be how 'pants' lost its 's'?

Oooo, possibly, though I haven't seen pantsuit myself *says Dark Magdalena as she dons her pants suit for her interview*.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #317 on: September 07, 2012, 12:46:17 PM »
I've been thinking about how 'pants' became 'pant'. So far, I've only seen it used for women's garments and there may be a reason.

A certain ensemble used to be called a 'pants suit'.  Lately, the term 'pantsuit' seems to be used.  It's even shown up in crosswords. 

Could that be how 'pants' lost its 's'?

Oooo, possibly, though I haven't seen pantsuit myself *says Dark Magdalena as she dons her pants suit for her interview*.

Good luck on the interview... and remember, if a customer asks you for a ride, it's probably a bad idea!
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Mental Magpie

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #318 on: September 07, 2012, 01:56:28 PM »
I've been thinking about how 'pants' became 'pant'. So far, I've only seen it used for women's garments and there may be a reason.

A certain ensemble used to be called a 'pants suit'.  Lately, the term 'pantsuit' seems to be used.  It's even shown up in crosswords. 

Could that be how 'pants' lost its 's'?

Oooo, possibly, though I haven't seen pantsuit myself *says Dark Magdalena as she dons her pants suit for her interview*.

Good luck on the interview... and remember, if a customer asks you for a ride, it's probably a bad idea!

Haha! Thanks! There are actually signs where I live (14 corrections facilities in one county!) that say something like "Prison nearby, DO NOT pick up hitchhikers!"
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

baglady

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #319 on: September 08, 2012, 06:06:13 PM »
The present participle refers to ongoing action, but it isn't necessary to use it for *every* ongoing action. If you break it down, the participle (going) tends to be used for right now, temporary ongoing actions, while the plain verb (go) is more for permanent, regular, habitual actions. I'm going to Bob's house. I go to Bob's every Saturday.

I came across a press release recently promoting a "sneak peak" airing of a TV show. This was a professional publicist who should know better. I'm pretty sure there were no mountaintops in this show.  :)
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violinp

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #320 on: September 08, 2012, 06:14:51 PM »
A bed does not sleep. Someone may sleep on a bed, but it is impossible for an inanimate object to sleep. Therefore, catalogue, do not say that a bed "sleeps" two. Never mind the fact that you never say the two of what a bed sleeps - days? years? centuries?
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Elfmama

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #321 on: September 08, 2012, 08:36:48 PM »
The present participle refers to ongoing action, but it isn't necessary to use it for *every* ongoing action. If you break it down, the participle (going) tends to be used for right now, temporary ongoing actions, while the plain verb (go) is more for permanent, regular, habitual actions. I'm going to Bob's house. I go to Bob's every Saturday.

I came across a press release recently promoting a "sneak peak" airing of a TV show. This was a professional publicist who should know better. I'm pretty sure there were no mountaintops in this show.  :)
Well, day-um!  I was looking forward to a mountaintop that tiptoed on and off.  Am I showing my age when I say that it sounds like something that would happen on the Muppet Show?
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MamaMootz

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #322 on: September 09, 2012, 12:23:39 AM »
Another one that makes me gnash my teeth.

"Awe! How cute!" posted on Facebook.

AWE is something you feel when something amazing happens and you are rendered speechless.

AWW is the sound you make when something is cute.

She then followed that by the world famous "ALOT", which is what just made my brain explode.
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LadyJaneinMD

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #323 on: September 10, 2012, 10:19:37 AM »
Meanwhile, the industry also adds unnecessary -ing to nouns. You don't buy sheets; you buy sheeting. Look at our lovely toweling. New, 100% cotton, no-iron shirting.

So when will they put the two trends together and offer us panting?  >:D

Iíve never seen this, though I donít doubt it happens and would also bother me.

However, the words shirting, sheeting, and toweling all do have a place in the industry: describing the fabric goods before they are made into shirts, sheets, and towels. Of course, instead of panting, we have "bottom-weight".

Oh look! I have a whole bolt of linen panting in my fabric room!

(things that sound dirty but really aren't)

Lovemykids

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #324 on: September 10, 2012, 12:55:41 PM »

This one is coming up a lot lately because it's an election year in the U.S.: It's So-cial Se-cur-i-ty, people. Six syllables! But over and over again I hear politicians and commentators saying "Sosh-curty," or similar mushmouthed abominations. This isn't a regional pronunciation thing -- *everybody* does it. How hard is it to sound out a two-syllable word and a four-syllable word? And don't get me started on people who ask for your Social Security number with "What's your social?" or worse, "What's your sosh?"

The above reminds me as well of the "Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade," which is so often called the "Macy Day Parade."  I even once heard a TV announcer call it that.  Whaa?

violinp

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #325 on: September 10, 2012, 12:59:33 PM »

This one is coming up a lot lately because it's an election year in the U.S.: It's So-cial Se-cur-i-ty, people. Six syllables! But over and over again I hear politicians and commentators saying "Sosh-curty," or similar mushmouthed abominations. This isn't a regional pronunciation thing -- *everybody* does it. How hard is it to sound out a two-syllable word and a four-syllable word? And don't get me started on people who ask for your Social Security number with "What's your social?" or worse, "What's your sosh?"

The above reminds me as well of the "Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade," which is so often called the "Macy Day Parade."  I even once heard a TV announcer call it that.  Whaa?

*facepalm*
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #326 on: September 10, 2012, 02:46:59 PM »
I was behind a car today with a bumper sticker that read


I"M ONLY DRIVING THIS BECAUSE THE KID'S KEEP FALLING OFF THE BROOM


Doesn't punctuation MEAN anything anymore?  The worse part: the car's other bumper stickers made it clear the driver was a tattoo artist  :-[  Now I know which tattoo parlor to never go to!

Editeer

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #327 on: September 10, 2012, 02:55:37 PM »
A bed does not sleep. Someone may sleep on a bed, but it is impossible for an inanimate object to sleep. Therefore, catalogue, do not say that a bed "sleeps" two. Never mind the fact that you never say the two of what a bed sleeps - days? years? centuries?


There's a brand of canned soup here (U.S.) that is advertised as being hearty and filling. The slogan is: "The soup that eats like a meal!" I can never hear/see the commercial without saying, "The soup that eats like a horse!" or "The soup that eats like a pig!"

Besides, why would you want to bring home soup that would eat *your* food?

violinp

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #328 on: September 10, 2012, 03:00:28 PM »
A bed does not sleep. Someone may sleep on a bed, but it is impossible for an inanimate object to sleep. Therefore, catalogue, do not say that a bed "sleeps" two. Never mind the fact that you never say the two of what a bed sleeps - days? years? centuries?


There's a brand of canned soup here (U.S.) that is advertised as being hearty and filling. The slogan is: "The soup that eats like a meal!" I can never hear/see the commercial without saying, "The soup that eats like a horse!" or "The soup that eats like a pig!"

Besides, why would you want to bring home soup that would eat *your* food?

Yes! I hate that commercial!
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


violinp

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Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #329 on: September 10, 2012, 03:08:27 PM »
Several years ago, there was a big fight somewhere locally. The newspaper reported that "someone was shot in the fracas." My dad said, "Well, that must've hurt. The fracas is a very sensitive part of the body."

"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter