News: IT'S THE 2ND ANNUAL GUATEMALA LIBRARY PROJECT BOOK DRIVE!    LOOKING FOR DONATIONS OF SCIENCE BOOKS THIS YEAR.    Check it out in the "Extending the Hand of Kindness" folder or here: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=139832.msg3372084#msg3372084   

  • August 23, 2017, 05:32:57 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 128065 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Redneck Gravy

  • Member
  • Posts: 3663
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #330 on: September 12, 2012, 03:40:46 PM »
Well this is why I post on this board...you learn something new everyday

I did not know ok was not OK!   So in the future if something is OK with me I will say so OK?

Here's the text version I hate: k           it just looks sarcastic and lonely


Giggity

  • Member
  • Posts: 8342
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #331 on: October 03, 2012, 07:46:09 PM »
Here's what my current one boils down to:

WORDS MEAN THINGS.

I cannot stand it when people arbitrarily decide that a word means something everyone in the world knows it does not mean.

Bonus points for insisting that the rest of us adhere to the bizarre redefinition.
Words mean things.

bansidhe

  • Member
  • Posts: 1991
    • The Menagerie
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #332 on: October 03, 2012, 10:33:58 PM »
It makes me twitchy when people say "my Facebook," "her Facebook," "a Facebook," etc. Your Facebook what? Add "account," "page," "feed" - something.
Esan ozenki!

Arizona

Giggity

  • Member
  • Posts: 8342
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #333 on: October 05, 2012, 09:22:38 AM »
Saw another one.

The short slangy form of "yes is "yeah." "Yeah" rhymes with "meh."

It is *not* "ya." "Ya" rhymes with "ha."
Words mean things.

Thipu1

  • Member
  • Posts: 7439
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #334 on: October 06, 2012, 07:52:04 AM »
Kind of odd that the slangy form of 'yes' actually has one more letter, isn't it?

oz diva

  • Member
  • Posts: 1212
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #335 on: October 06, 2012, 08:47:36 AM »
Decimate. It's misused all the time. Ie the town was decimated in the bushfire. Means it was reduced by 1/10th. What they really mean was that the town was razed. Decimate does not mean destroyed.

Victoria

lady_disdain

  • Member
  • Posts: 5872
    • Contemporary Jewelry
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #336 on: October 06, 2012, 09:33:11 AM »
Decimate. It's misused all the time. Ie the town was decimated in the bushfire. Means it was reduced by 1/10th. What they really mean was that the town was razed. Decimate does not mean destroyed.

Decimated means, according to Merriam Webster:
   
1- Kill, destroy, or remove a large percentage of.
2- Drastically reduce the strength or effectiveness of (something): "plant viruses that can decimate yields".

Its origins is, as you said, to reduce by 10%. Or, better yet, to punish an army by killing 1 out of 10 men, drawn by lot. However, over the centuries, it has developed new meanings. Insisting that it can only have the original meaning is a little pedantic, in my view. Or else we need to admit that forging should only be used to describe something shaped by hammering or compression (so no deal can be forged), that glass can only refer to the material and not to items made of it (drinking glass, eye glasses), that a snowflake is only something that falls from the sky and not a very special person, etc.

scotcat60

  • Member
  • Posts: 712
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #337 on: October 06, 2012, 10:07:43 AM »
The short slangy form of "yes is "yeah." "Yeah" rhymes with "meh."

It is *not* "ya." "Ya" rhymes with "ha."

Unless you are a Sloane Ranger, and affecting an exaggerated accent.


P.S. Why does no one seem to use the word "Might" any more.? All I ever here is the word "May". I know it is a fine point about it's usage, but it does seem to be disappearing from the language.

Lovemykids

  • Formerly known as Lovemygirls
  • Member
  • Posts: 741
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #338 on: October 06, 2012, 07:42:23 PM »
The short slangy form of "yes is "yeah." "Yeah" rhymes with "meh."

It is *not* "ya." "Ya" rhymes with "ha."

See, now, I pronounce "yeah" with a short "a" sound as in "apple."  I pronounce "meh" with a short "e" sound as in "let."  (I don't use the spelling "ya" at all, except in something like, "see ya," and in that case, it's a short "u" sound, like in "duh.")

Shoo

  • Member
  • Posts: 15855
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #339 on: October 06, 2012, 07:45:20 PM »
Saw another one.

The short slangy form of "yes is "yeah." "Yeah" rhymes with "meh."

It is *not* "ya." "Ya" rhymes with "ha."

Yeah doesn't rhyme with meh.  Yeah has a short "a" sound and meh has a short "e" sound.  That's how I've always heard those words pronounced, anyway.

Mental Magpie

  • Member
  • Posts: 4138
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #340 on: October 07, 2012, 12:15:12 AM »
The short slangy form of "yes is "yeah." "Yeah" rhymes with "meh."

It is *not* "ya." "Ya" rhymes with "ha."

See, now, I pronounce "yeah" with a short "a" sound as in "apple."  I pronounce "meh" with a short "e" sound as in "let."  (I don't use the spelling "ya" at all, except in something like, "see ya," and in that case, it's a short "u" sound, like in "duh.")

This is also how I pronounce them.  scotcat60, is this maybe a regional difference?

bansidhe

  • Member
  • Posts: 1991
    • The Menagerie
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #341 on: October 07, 2012, 12:16:36 AM »
Saw another one.

The short slangy form of "yes is "yeah." "Yeah" rhymes with "meh."

It is *not* "ya." "Ya" rhymes with "ha."

Yeah doesn't rhyme with meh.  Yeah has a short "a" sound and meh has a short "e" sound.  That's how I've always heard those words pronounced, anyway.

Until I came to this thread, I had no idea anyone pronounced "yeah" any way other than rhyming with "meh." This must be a regional difference. Never heard anyone in my neck of the woods pronounce it with a short "a" sound.
Esan ozenki!

Arizona

Mental Magpie

  • Member
  • Posts: 4138
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #342 on: October 07, 2012, 12:19:54 AM »
Saw another one.

The short slangy form of "yes is "yeah." "Yeah" rhymes with "meh."

It is *not* "ya." "Ya" rhymes with "ha."

Yeah doesn't rhyme with meh.  Yeah has a short "a" sound and meh has a short "e" sound.  That's how I've always heard those words pronounced, anyway.

Until I came to this thread, I had no idea anyone pronounced "yeah" any way other than rhyming with "meh." This must be a regional difference. Never heard anyone in my neck of the woods pronounce it with a short "a" sound.

I had no idea anyone pronounced it rhyming with "meh".  That is so weird! (totally smiling and surprised that it is pronounced any other way).

bansidhe

  • Member
  • Posts: 1991
    • The Menagerie
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #343 on: October 07, 2012, 12:42:36 AM »
I'm going to be paying close attention to the way people say it from now on. I want to catch someone in the act.  :D
Esan ozenki!

Arizona

Diane AKA Traska

  • Member
  • Posts: 4568
  • Or you can just call me Diane. (NE USA EHellion)
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #344 on: October 07, 2012, 12:52:36 AM »
The funny thing is, I've never heard either!  What I hear (and say) is a single syllable word that other wise sounds like "yeh-ah".
Location:
Philadelphia, PA