Author Topic: Grammar quirks  (Read 44043 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Diane AKA Traska

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4499
  • Or you can just call me Diane. (NE USA EHellion)
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #360 on: October 08, 2012, 02:54:18 PM »
My brain is breaking over the word "contracepting," which has been showing up in the political sphere recently.  On the one hand, it's not a word!  On the other hand, there's no quick and snappy verb meaning "using contraception," so I can understand why.  There's no good way to say "We're contracepting ourselves out of existence!" unless you make up the word "contracepting."

I... actually like the word.  It's a clean word that makes sense, not only in the term "using contraception", but also when you actually break the word down, as in "actively trying not to conceive".  I can understand the opposition due to it not being a real word, but no word is a real word until it's invented, right?
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

Slartibartfast

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 11664
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #361 on: October 08, 2012, 06:28:09 PM »
My brain is breaking over the word "contracepting," which has been showing up in the political sphere recently.  On the one hand, it's not a word!  On the other hand, there's no quick and snappy verb meaning "using contraception," so I can understand why.  There's no good way to say "We're contracepting ourselves out of existence!" unless you make up the word "contracepting."

I... actually like the word.  It's a clean word that makes sense, not only in the term "using contraception", but also when you actually break the word down, as in "actively trying not to conceive".  I can understand the opposition due to it not being a real word, but no word is a real word until it's invented, right?

That's about the conclusion I've grudgingly come to, but it still makes my head hurt  :P

Free Range Hippy Chick

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 640
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #362 on: October 09, 2012, 04:36:36 AM »
Should it not be 'contraceiving'?

Diane AKA Traska

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4499
  • Or you can just call me Diane. (NE USA EHellion)
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #363 on: October 09, 2012, 10:35:09 AM »
To be completely grammatically correct, yes.  But, the root is contraception, and trying to get people to move past that would be difficult at best.
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

Shoo

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 16393
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #364 on: October 09, 2012, 11:18:51 AM »
I often see people write standing "on line" instead of "in line."  To me that makes no sense.  The line is something you stand in, not on.  I don't think it's possible to stand on a line of people.  I've seen Americans use this phrase as well as non-Americans. 

Giggity

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8622
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #365 on: October 09, 2012, 04:04:13 PM »
Two things that are pretty much the same thing: those are "one and the same."

"One in the same" doesn't even make SENSE.
Words mean things.

Lovemykids

  • Formerly known as Lovemygirls
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 728
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #366 on: October 09, 2012, 04:24:39 PM »
I often see people write standing "on line" instead of "in line."  To me that makes no sense.  The line is something you stand in, not on.  I don't think it's possible to stand on a line of people.  I've seen Americans use this phrase as well as non-Americans.

I usually hear this from my friends who grew up in the New York/New England region.  One of them told me that when she was young and going to public elementary school, each class would have to line up on a parking lot line in the morning before being led into school by the teachers.  This was her explanation for "standing on line."  I don't know if it's one of those word origins that's been made up to fit the phrase, but it's what she told me . . .

Editeer

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 306
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #367 on: October 09, 2012, 04:39:31 PM »
I don't believe this has been mentioned yet -

She called me out of my name -- meaning

She called me a name.

First one makes NO sense, second one says it exactly. Can't figure it out.

I believe that "She called me out of my name" means "She called me something other than my correct name" with the implication that she did it deliberately to be disrespectful.
 
So, "She called me out of my name" could mean--
"She called me a stupid git"
or
"She called me Bobby when she knows I prefer Robert."


As for "standing on line"--I grew up in New York, and we indeed said "on line" instead of "in line." This was way before the Internet and the whole idea of doing things "on line" (on a network). I have no idea where it came from, though.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2012, 04:42:42 PM by Editeer »

demarco

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4154
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #368 on: October 09, 2012, 07:06:59 PM »
I often see people write standing "on line" instead of "in line."  To me that makes no sense.  The line is something you stand in, not on.  I don't think it's possible to stand on a line of people.  I've seen Americans use this phrase as well as non-Americans.

I usually hear this from my friends who grew up in the New York/New England region.  One of them told me that when she was young and going to public elementary school, each class would have to line up on a parking lot line in the morning before being led into school by the teachers.  This was her explanation for "standing on line."  I don't know if it's one of those word origins that's been made up to fit the phrase, but it's what she told me . . .

I grew upon Massachusetts and always said "in line" as did everyone else I knew.  It was not until I met my NYC raised boyfriend that I ever heard anyone say "on line." It sounded so wrong and, you are right, Shoo, it makes no sense.  I tried to break him of it to no avail. I married him anyway.  He still says it his way and I say it mine. 

I suspect this started out being regional and spread.  I hear a lot of people say it now. 

oz diva

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1133
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #369 on: October 10, 2012, 09:56:54 AM »
'In line' and 'on line' do seem to be regional things. 

Along the same lines, in some areas people 'fill out a form'.  In others they 'fill out a form'. 

Most New Yorkers I know 'stand on line to fill out a form'.
And here we queue.

Ps you've got the same phrase twice there.

Victoria

Thipu1

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6695
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #370 on: October 10, 2012, 10:07:26 AM »
'In line' and 'on line' do seem to be regional things. 

Along the same lines, in some areas people 'fill out a form'.  In others they 'fill out a form'. 

Most New Yorkers I know 'stand on line to fill out a form'.
And here we queue.

Ps you've got the same phrase twice there.

I fixed that, thank you.

BTW, I understand that 'filling in a form' is the standard in Australia. 

baglady

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4611
  • A big lass and a bonny lass and she loves her beer
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #371 on: October 10, 2012, 02:34:10 PM »
I have an acquaintance from the Midwest who says things happen "on accident." I've always heard/said "by accident."

I fill out forms by filling in the blanks.
My photography is on Redbubble! Come see: http://www.redbubble.com/people/baglady

Mental Magpie

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5170
  • ...for the dark side looks back.
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #372 on: October 10, 2012, 02:35:45 PM »
I'm from northwestern PA; I say both "by accident" and "on accident", depending on the rest of the sentence.

"I did it on accident."
"It happened by accident."
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Gyburc

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1697
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #373 on: October 11, 2012, 07:08:26 AM »
My current grammar pet peeve is the use of the word 'whereby', which seems to have become the word of choice for radio presenters in the UK.

Whereby means 'because of which' or 'as a result of which', but it's constantly being used as a synonym for 'in which' - so for example 'This is a situation whereby person X is doing Y...'

It drives. me. nuts. For goodness' sake, if you're determined to use a complicated word to try to sound clever, get it right!

signed,

Gyburc who shouts at the radio quite a lot.  ;D

When you look into the photocopier, the photocopier also looks into you

oz diva

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1133
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: Grammar quirks
« Reply #374 on: October 11, 2012, 09:51:52 AM »
'In line' and 'on line' do seem to be regional things. 

Along the same lines, in some areas people 'fill out a form'.  In others they 'fill out a form'. 

Most New Yorkers I know 'stand on line to fill out a form'.
And here we queue.

Ps you've got the same phrase twice there.

I fixed that, thank you.

BTW, I understand that 'filling in a form' is the standard in Australia.
Actually both sound plausible to me. Perhaps I fill it in more than out.

Victoria